KNIGHT: Vote fraud as ‘payback time’

Ballot abuse strikes at the heart of self-government

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A criminal investigation in Iowa turned up 80 cases of potential voter fraud. Many recent legislative races in Iowa were decided by fewer than 100 votes, including 10 decided by fewer than 50 votes.

A similar report by a Philadelphia city commissioner in 2012 chronicled multiple instances of voter fraud through impersonation, double voting and voting by noncitizens.

To all of this, the left’s election think tank, the George Soros-funded Brennan Center at New York University, has a uniform answer: There are so few prosecuted cases of vote fraud out of millions of ballots cast that it makes no difference.

That’s like saying “there’s nothing to see here” if a home in a 1,000-unit residential development is burglarized. “After all, 99.9 percent of the homes were not robbed.” Every fraudulent vote steals a legitimately cast ballot.

A recent Rasmussen poll of “likely U.S. voters” shows that 78 percent favor voter-ID laws that include proof of U.S. citizenship, with only 19 percent opposing that requirement. Other polls show broad support for voter photo-ID requirements, regardless of race or party.

When someone like poll worker Melowese Richardson is feted after being convicted of fraud, it strikes at the heart of election integrity — and self-government.

She’ll probably turn up next in Chicago, where she could go beyond poll work and get herself elected to something or other.

Robert Knight is senior fellow for the American Civil Rights Union and a columnist for The Washington Times.

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