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Wide receiver and tight end were expected to be the focus by New York on the draft’s second day. After a run on wide receivers early in the second round, the Jets went after Amaro.

“Certainly, he should have an impact on our passing game,” Idzik said. “No doubt.”

Idzik acknowledged that the Jets made calls to try to move up in the second round - presumably to try to get one of the remaining top-rated wide receivers.

Amaro often lined up wide or in motion in college, and Mornhinweg could use him in dual tight end packages with incumbent starter Jeff Cumberland.

“I think the combination of him and Cumberland gives you two big targets, and believe me, those guys are hard to defend,” Ryan said.

Cumberland, a converted wide receiver, is considered more of an all-around type of tight end who led the Jets with a career-high four touchdown receptions last season. The Jets also have the inexperienced Zach Sudfeld and Chris Pantale, along with veteran Konrad Reuland, who’s coming off a major knee injury, at the position.

Despite a knock that he’s not much of a blocker, Amaro insisted that it’s actually one of his better assets. In fact, he said, he had 10 or 11 pancakes - or knockdowns - in games during his first two seasons at Texas Tech.

“Of course, I’m going to feel more comfortable at the slot right now,” Amaro said. “There were times growing up that I played in line, so it’s not tremendously different. … I think it’s just going to take me a couple of weeks.”

Amaro, a San Antonio native, had a feeling the Jets would draft him, but thought he might be a first-round selection. He ended up being the third tight end taken, after first-rounder Eric Ebron (No. 10 overall to Detroit) and second-rounder Austin Seferian-Jenkins, who went 11 picks before him to Tampa Bay.

“On the visit, I felt like I fit really well there,” Amaro said of the Jets. “I thought I was going to get picked in the first round to them. It didn’t happen, and that was something that was disappointing because you go into the second round, you don’t really know who’s going to pick you.

“That was the place I wanted to play.”

The Jets, who drafted former Louisville safety Calvin Pryor in the first round, headed into the final day with nine picks.

“We’ll see what happens,” Idzik said. “It’s nice going in with some ammunition.”

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