- Associated Press - Tuesday, May 20, 2014

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - A group of college students brought to the U.S. illegally as children said they’re unsatisfied after meeting with Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy on Tuesday about helping them obtain institutional financial aid.

Six members of Connecticut Students for a DREAM met with the Democrat at his state Capitol office, a meeting arranged after the group appeared at several of his recent town hall events. They wanted Malloy to commit to changing state law and allowing them to become eligible for the aid, despite their immigration status.

Lucas Codognolla, the group’s lead coordinator, said Malloy refused to take immediate action.

“But we’re going to hold him accountable to working with us, to getting us institutional aid by this fall,” he said. Such aid is funded with student tuition payments.

Malloy spokesman Andrew Doba said the governor is sympathetic to the group’s concerns and asked them to return with more information.

“The governor was happy to have a conversation on this issue, as he was the first governor in the country to sign a state-based DREAM Act,” Doba said, referring to a 2011 bill that allowed students brought to the U.S. illegally as children to pay the less expensive, in-state tuition at Connecticut’s public colleges and universities.

Doba said Malloy looked forward to “additional conversations” with the students.

Faye Phillip of Stamford said she was brought to the U.S. from Trinidad and Tobago. The 25-year-old said she had been attending community college to study accounting but had to quit because she could no longer afford her tuition.