5 things to know about the Georgia Senate primary

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ATLANTA (AP) - The Georgia Senate race will be one of the most closely watched of the 2014 midterm elections. Republicans are looking to defend retiring Sen. Saxby Chambliss’ seat as they try to regain control of the Senate for the final two years of the Obama administration.

Democrats want to pull off an upset and put a serious dent in GOP hopes of scoring a net six-seat gain needed for a Senate majority. Here are five things you need to know:

DAVID PERDUE AND JACK KINGSTON HEADED TO GOP RUNOFF

Republican voters whittled a seven-candidate GOP field down to two. Former Dollar General CEO David Perdue led the field with 30 percent of the vote with 97 percent of precincts reporting. Rep. Jack Kingston of Savannah had 26 percent. Now they start from scratch for an nine-week campaign before a July 22 runoff.

NUNN WINS DEMOCRATIC NOMINATION

Michelle Nunn ran up a huge margin, as expected, over three rivals to win the Democratic nomination. The former nonprofit executive wants to win the same Senate seat that her father, Sam Nunn, held from 1972 to 1997.

HOMETOWN STRENGTH

Kingston ran strong in southeast Georgia across the Savannah-based congressional district he has represented in Congress for more than 21 years. Third-place finisher Karen Handel, meanwhile, led in many populous precincts around her home base of Fulton County, but that got her only to 22 percent.

TWO CONGRESSMEN LOSE OUT

Rep. Phil Gingrey of Marietta finished a distant fourth, a few thousand votes ahead of Rep. Paul Broun of Athens. Both men will give up their House seats in January when a new Congress takes office.

FAULT LINES CLEAR IN GOP RUNOFF

The Republicans’ second round pits the businessman “outsider” against an 11-term congressman who wants a promotion. Perdue says voters should send a former corporate CEO to the Senate rather than a “career politician.” Kingston, who has an endorsement from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, says his record in Washington proves his conservative credentials.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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