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Wawrinka’s loss means yet another season will pass without one man winning the Australian Open and French Open; Jim Courier was the last to accomplish that double, in 1992.

Another top-10 man lost Monday when No. 9 Kei Nishikori of Japan was eliminated by Martin Klizan of Slovakia. No. 17 Roberta Vinci of Italy was the only seeded woman to exit Monday, when winners included 2012 champion Maria Sharapova and 2011 Wimbledon winner Petra Kvitova.

Nadal and Djokovic, meanwhile, looked very much like the top two seeds.

When No. 2 Djokovic’s victory was interrupted by one of the passing showers that made Monday a stop-and-start affair, he pulled a white windbreaker over his head, plopped down on his changeover bench, and invited a ball boy to sit, too. Djokovic exchanged a racket for the kid’s tournament umbrella. Then Djokovic handed over a Perrier, grabbed his own orange-colored drink, and the pair clinked bottles, sipped, then had a conversation.

“We had a nice chat. He’s a tennis player, so I asked him how long he’s (been) playing and how he’s enjoying his time as a ball kid,” Djokovic related with a smile. “Fun time.”

Yes, all’s fun and games when you’re on your way to a 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 victory against 44th-ranked Joao Sousa of Portugal.

Nadal improved to 60-1 at the French Open by winning 6-0, 6-3, 6-0 over Robby Ginepri, an American ranked 279th.

“It’s probably one of the toughest feats in sports,” Ginepri said, “to play Nadal at the French Open.”

Afterward, Nadal shrugged off the idea that he might have felt snubbed about playing in Court Suzanne Lenglen instead of the tournament’s main stadium.

“Doesn’t really matter a lot,” Nadal said.

Nothing seems to matter much when he plays in Paris.