Court gives OJ lawyers a week to resubmit appeal

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LAS VEGAS (AP) - O.J. Simpson’s lawyers were given another week Friday to reformat and resubmit an appeal to the Nevada Supreme Court seeking a new trial in the kidnapping and armed robbery case of the former football star.

In the order, Chief Justice Mark Gibbons agreed to accept a supersized 20,000-word document that Simpson’s lawyers had submitted before a May 21 deadline if it complies with court formatting rules.

“Basically they want it to be double-spaced,” court spokesman Michael Sommermeyer said.

The document hasn’t been made public, and the seven justices haven’t decided whether to rehear oral arguments in case. The court rejected an initial appeal by Simpson in September 2010.

Simpson attorney Patricia Palm said she was glad the justices agreed to accept the 19,933 words she submitted nine days ago. The new deadline is June 6.

Palm noted the court frequently accepts briefs longer than its 14,000-word limit in complex cases.

Palm and Simpson appeal lawyers Ozzie Fumo and Tom Pitaro want the court to reconsider the contention that Simpson got bad legal advice, that his trial lawyer had a conflict of interest, and that Simpson’s 2008 Las Vegas trial was tainted by his notoriety.

Clark County District Judge Linda Marie Bell rejected those arguments and others in a Nov. 26 ruling that totaled 101 pages.

Simpson, 66, is serving nine to 33 years in a state prison in Lovelock after a jury found him guilty of kidnapping, armed robbery and other charges in a confrontation with two sports memorabilia dealers at a Las Vegas casino hotel.

He’s not eligible for parole until late 2017.

Simpson claims he was trying to retrieve items that had been stolen from him after he was acquitted of killing Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman in Los Angeles, and a 1997 civil case against Simpson that resulted in a wrongful-death judgment of $33.5 million.

The NFL hall of famer testified last year that he thought he had a right to get his belongings back, and that he never knew any of the men with him were carrying guns.

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