- Associated Press - Tuesday, May 6, 2014

TORONTO (AP) - Dwane Casey never wondered what kind of suitors he might attract after leading the Raptors to a record-setting season and a division title. He already knew he wanted to stay in Toronto.

The Raptors made Casey’s return official Tuesday, announcing a three-year contract extension for the coach whose team won a franchise-best 48 games this season and ended a six-year playoff drought. Toronto lost to Brooklyn in Game 7 of the first round Sunday.

“It was easy to come back and be a part of this, be a part of the growing process,” Casey said at a news conference.

Casey took a pass when general manager Masai Ujiri first approached him about a new deal in late March, saying he’d rather wait until the season was over. He wasn’t playing hard ball; he just didn’t want to be a distraction. A wider job search, Casey insisted, was never on his mind.

“It would be so disingenuous to go out and even put your foot out in the market,” Casey said. “I didn’t even give it a second thought. My heart is here. My mind is here.”

Casey was hired by former GM Bryan Colangelo in June 2011, shortly after winning a championship in Dallas as an assistant to Rick Carlisle. He got his first head coaching job with Minnesota in 2005 but was fired in January 2007.

When Ujiri was hired to replace Colangelo last May, Casey was entering the final year of his contract and looked to be on shaky ground.

While Casey acknowledged “it wasn’t all roses” with his new boss, the two men didn’t take long to develop a trusting, open relationship.

“We’ve had tough conversations. We’ve had disagreements,” Ujiri said. “That’s part of the business.”

Toronto started 6-12 this season, and Ujiri acknowledged Tuesday that more rebuilding was in the plans after Rudy Gay was traded to Sacramento in a seven-player deal in December. Instead, Toronto went on a tear, going 41-22 after the trade, the best record in the Eastern Conference.

The surprising success fostered a strong sense of camaraderie among the Raptors, exemplified by an “I’m all in” document Casey drafted and had the whole team sign at their first meeting after the All-Star break.

“It probably wouldn’t hold up in court but (it was) a document committing to the team, committing to the process,” Casey said. “Everybody jumped up and didn’t hesitate (to sign), and the next night we go out and beat Washington in Washington.”

Casey kept the paper in his briefcase after that, carrying it around with him the rest of the season.

“I’m probably going to frame it,” he said.

Casey said winning against the odds, and the sense of togetherness in Toronto’s locker room, made this “one of the most fruitful years I’ve had in coaching and been around in coaching, even throughout the (Dallas) championship.”

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