- Associated Press - Wednesday, May 7, 2014

NEW YORK (AP) - When I became pregnant with my daughter, now 4, I didn’t even own a smartphone. I did most of my pregnancy research with my desktop computer and those pregnancy books that nearly every first-time mom reads.

Now, baby No. 2 is on the way and times have changed. With the rise of smartphones, tablets and wearable devices, there’s no shortage of pregnancy-related high-tech products on the market.

I get weekly updates explaining what’s going on with my body and my baby’s development, which show up as notifications from my various iPhone apps. The first time around, I got emails from pregnancy websites.

There are also apps to track how much weight you’ve gained, how often your baby kicks and eventually how far apart your contractions are. There are even smartphone-enabled devices that let you listen to your baby’s heartbeat at home.

Like a lot of second-time moms, I didn’t feel the need to gorge myself on pregnancy information this time around. But I did download some of the more popular apps. I stuck largely to free apps, though I also tested a $129 fetal heart monitor that attaches to a smartphone.

Although the apps don’t cover everything an expectant mom needs to know, they offer enough that I’ve barely dusted off my pregnancy books this time around.

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- BabyBump (free, or $4 for ad-free version with additional features; for Apple and Android devices):

Like the other pregnancy apps I tried, you start by entering your due date, weight and other information. The app creates a chart tracking your progress and showing the number of days left.

BabyBump also encourages you to upload a photo of your expanding belly each week to create a time-lapsed series of your growth, but I didn’t bother with that.

There are daily tips and a weekly update explaining what’s going on with your body and baby. You can play slideshows of you and your baby’s week-by-week development. These are in the form of drawings showing an expanding belly and what’s inside.

You can also join online pregnancy groups and use the app to keep a journal.

The free version has advertising on the bottom. The $4 pro version doesn’t. The pro version also has a kick counter and contraction tracker, along with planning tools for shopping, name selection and birth announcements. I didn’t feel the need to pay.

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- WebMD Pregnancy (free, for Apple devices only):

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