- - Friday, October 10, 2014

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Throwing ad-hominem, false attacks at a respected animal charity is beyond the pale for a daily newspaper (“The inhumane society,” Editorial, Web, Sept. 30). It’s especially irresponsible that nobody at The Washington Times saw fit to call the Humane Society of the United States for comment or clarification, or apparently even check our website at humanesociety.org before printing the recent editorial.

The HSUS celebrates its 60th anniversary next month. In 1954, our founders formed a new organization to help all animals — in shelters and elsewhere — by attacking the root causes of cruelty in society. Today our programs range from working to stop cruel puppy mills and factory farms to ending poaching. We help companion animals but also farm animals, wildlife and the rest of the 99 percent of animals that never enter a shelter. In 2013 alone, with our affiliates, we provided direct care and services for more than 100,000 animals, including pets in poverty, street dogs, neglected horses and many others.

We did settle a lawsuit earlier this year, but that’s where The Times departs from anything resembling reality. This case was filed 14 years ago, and the HSUS was not involved in bringing it. It was brought in 2000 by numerous groups, including the Fund for Animals. The HSUS became affiliated with the Fund for Animals in 2005, several years after the case was filed. We continue to pursue legal cases on behalf of animals with great success, and our supporters thank us for that work every day.

The HSUS continues to be transparent about where donor dollars go, spending more than 81 percent of our funds on animal-protection programs. Whether it’s working with law enforcement on cruelty cases or raising awareness about the inhumane and unsanitary conditions for animals in factory farms across the nation, we’re there for all animals.

We’re proud of the work that we do. This transparency and good stewardship of donations have helped us get ranked by Guidestar’s Philanthropedia experts as the No, 1 high-impact animal-protection organization.

ALAN HEYMANN

Vice president, communications

The Humane Society of the United States

Washington

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