- Associated Press - Friday, September 12, 2014

RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) - South Dakota’s first storm of the season dumped nearly 8 inches of snow in some areas on the western side of the state.

The National Weather Service said the snow that fell overnight Wednesday and into Thursday was the earliest measurable snowfall of the season ever recorded.

“It’s a historic snowfall,” meteorologist Dan McKemy told the Rapid City Journal (http://bit.ly/1lZy25B ). The previous earliest date of measurable snowfall in South Dakota’s West River region was on Sept. 13, 1970, he said.

Custer received the brunt of the snow, recording nearly 8 inches by early Thursday afternoon.

As a lifelong resident of western South Dakota, Donale Walker wasn’t surprised to see snow on the ground when she got ready for work in Custer around 5 a.m. Thursday.

“I’ve lived in the Black Hills my whole life, so I’m kind of used to the strange weather we have,” Walker said.

Despite the large accumulation of snow, the reaction of locals wasn’t too bad, said Mike Carter, director of emergency management for Custer County.

“Really, other than three separate power outages, we haven’t had any problems,” said Carter, adding that there were no reported vehicle accidents caused by the snow.

In Rapid City, snowfall was minimal compared to Custer, with the National Weather Service recording snowfall at 1.6 inches at 2 p.m. on Thursday.

In Hill City, the 1880 Train was running right on schedule Thursday, although patrons were down a bit, said Meg Warder, the organization’s president.

“Of course we are, we run rain or shine,” Warder said. “It’s a great way to see the Hills, and we have some people who are riding today just to see the snow in the Hills.”

McKemy said the temperature in the region on Thursday was 30 to 40 degrees below the normal of about 75. Temperatures will warm some over the weekend, and should move back into the 70s and 80s next week, he said.

___

Information from: Rapid City Journal, http://www.rapidcityjournal.com

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide