- Associated Press - Monday, April 20, 2015

COVINGTON, Ky. (AP) - A group of mayors in northern Kentucky are seeking a solution to the growing number of sinkholes along streets caused by crumbling underground sewer lines.

The Kentucky Enquirer (http://cin.ci/1bkrb2Y) reports the Kenton Mayors Group met Saturday and approved a resolution that asks Sanitation District 1 to restart a program it ended in July 2013 that helped repair crumbling sewer laterals and streets.

The mayors say in the resolution that the sinkholes, the lateral breaks and the crumbling streets are matters of public health and safety.

Residents have been responsible for repairs since the service ended, but street fixes haven’t been consistent.

Sanitation District Director David Rager said the service was eliminated due to budget cuts.

“We did do the repairs for about five years,” Rager said. “We averaged about 75 repairs a year across Campbell, Boone and Kenton counties.” He said the program cost the district spent about $600,000 annually.

Covington City Manager Larry Klein said the city has so many sinkholes caused by the lateral line problems it has run out of steel sheets to cover them.

Although it has been harder hit because it has more older homes, some mayors said they expect the issue to spread.

“This will eventually be an issue for everyone,” said Independence Mayor Chris Reinersman, who noted his city has a fair share of older homes as well as new. “I feel like there is too much risk to the individual property owners, as well as the taxpayers in general, to leave repair of sewer laterals in the right of way up to the property owner.”

Rager said officials are currently discussing budget projections for next year.

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Information from: The Kentucky Enquirer, http://www.nky.com

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