- Associated Press - Monday, June 8, 2015

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - Some mothers are known for telling you to comb your hair. Some mothers are known to say, “Do your homework,” but for the Mundahl family, Mom is known is for giving advice about the potholes on turn two.

The Mundahl family, Carrie and her husband, Steve, decided to celebrate Mother’s Day with their daughter, Emily, and son, Nathan, tearing up the track at the Dacotah Speedway with their family street stock car #11. For this week’s race, Emily was the driver, Carrie was the coach/spotter, Steve was the one-man pit crew and Nathan was support from the stands.

While preparing for the first race, under the roar of the deafening engines, Carrie Mundahl inspected her daughter’s safety equipment and helped buckle her into her harness while giving pointers on what she observed about the day’s track conditions and other drivers.

At the end of the first race, Emily Mundahl, 19, was able to beat the majority of the other racers with a third-place finish, allowing her to compete in the week’s feature race at the end of the night. When the car entered the pits to await the next race, Steve Mundahl jumped on the lug nuts with a wrench while Carrie Mundahl helped her dust-covered daughter from the car., the Bismarck Tribune (http://bit.ly/1MqehNx ) reported.

“It feels good to have a successful race,” Emily Mundahl said as she wiped the dust from her eyes. “I get nervous when she watches me; I want to make her proud.”

“If you just try your best, I will always be proud of you,” Carrie Mundahl said as she wrapped her arm around her daughter’s shoulder and pulled her close.

For the Mundahls, racing is not so much a competition as it is a family heritage. Carrie Mundahl has been racing for the past 25 years with her husband by her side. Throughout the pits and stands of the speedway, Carrie Mundahl is known for her expertise and her clean driving skills.

“I wanted to be like Mom while I was growing up around the speedway,” Emily Mundahl said. “I wanted to race. Once I started racing, I wanted to race Mom, now I want to beat Mom when she races against me.”

“As a child, I looked forward to waking up in the mornings and see all the trophies Mom won the night before setting on the kitchen table,” Nathan Mundahl said. “It was so cool; in school I always had the best show and tells. Nobody else had a mother who was a race car driver. When I started to race, it got a little competitive. I didn’t want to come to school and be the boy who lost to his mother at the speedway.”

Members of the family spend about three nights a week together working on their four race cars preparing for weekend races. This week’s project was getting the car painted for the summer. They added pink and blue racing stripes to Emily Mundahl’s white race car.

“If you ding the paint tonight, try to ding the blue paint. It is on sale this week,” Steve Mundahl said with a joking smile to his daughter.

When Steve Mundahl was asked what he was going to do for Carrie on Mother’s Day, he explained he and Nathan were going to spend the weekend at home watching the dogs so Carrie and Emily could travel to Minnesota to pursue their other racing interest, BMX racing.

In the night’s street stock car feature event, Emily Mundahl had an unfortunate 360-degree spin out on the second lap of the race. In the remaining 18 laps of the race, her family cheered her on as she battled, car by car, from dead last to finishing in 16th place in a field of 24 other racers.

At the end of the night, for the Mundahls, it wasn’t about what place they finished or what happened on the track, it was about being together, being a family.

“I have a garage full of junk; we will keep racing together till we run out of it,” Steve Mundahl said as he smiled at his family.

___

Information from: Bismarck Tribune, http://www.bismarcktribune.com

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