- Associated Press - Friday, February 12, 2016

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - A judge on Friday dismissed a lawsuit filed by a student against the Metro Nashville Public School system alleging she was pulled out of an algebra class so she wouldn’t have to take a test, allowing her school to artificially inflate its scores.

WTVF reports (http://tinyurl.com/jzn69aw ) Davidson County Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle dismissed the suit brought by 18-year-old Toni Jones, saying the teen hadn’t shown her constitutional right to an education was violated.

Jones was a freshman at Pearl-Cohn High in Nashville when she was pulled out of an algebra class before and End-of-Course (EOC) exam that is used to evaluate the school’s performance. Records show that Jones was passing the algebra class, but predictive tests indicated she might not score well on the exam.

The student was told instead to study algebra in a computer lab on her own. As a result, the teen maintains that without a teacher, she was unable to complete a course that she needed to graduate and her academic career has still not recovered.

The school system maintained that just because Jones had been put into an alternative setting did not mean she was being deprived of her constitutional right to an education. The government’s legal arguments did not address the allegations that the school had tried to game the testing system.

Metro School officials did not return a phone call seeking comment on the allegations.

Nashville attorney Gary Blackburn, who represents the teen, said after the ruling that they would appeal.

The state is investigating testing in Nashville schools after a series of reports by WTVF questioned whether some schools artificially inflated test scores.

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