- The Washington Times - Thursday, June 2, 2016

The BBC’s head of religion and ethics told students at the University of Huddersfield Wednesday that the Islamic State terrorist group is “of course” driven by “some form of Islamic doctrine,” despite the liberal media’s effort to keep religion separate.

Aaqil Ahmed, the first Muslim to hold the top religion post at the BBC, was speaking at an event last week hosted by Lapido, the Centre for Religious Literacy in World Affairs.

“I hear so many people say ISIS has nothing to do with Islam – of course it has,” Mr. Ahmed said, using an acronym for the Islamic State. “They are not preaching Judaism. It might be wrong, but what they are saying is an ideology based on some form of Islamic doctrine. They are Muslims.”

“That is a fact and we have to get our head around some very uncomfortable things,” he added. “That is where the difficulty comes in for many journalists because the vast majority of Muslims won’t agree with them [ISIS].”

Paul Vallely, a journalism professor at the University of Chester who chaired the panel agreed, saying, “We need to open trainees’ eyes.”

“Religion is not on the way out, it is on the way in — in a big way,” he said.

Mercy Ette, a journalism instructor at Huddersfield University, added, “Being literate about religion is critical if journalists are to write intelligently about crucial issues. We live in a world that is very diverse on issues to do with religion and unless our journalists understand the issues, then all they will talk will be the versions they know.”

Mr. Ahmed joined the BBC from Channel 4 in 2009 and commissioned the award winning documentaries “Inside The Mind Of A Suicide Bomber” and “The Qur’an,” The Independent reported.

He joined last week’s panel to help launch Lapido’s media handbook “The Caliphate,” which he called a “great entry-level read” on Islamic extremism.

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