- Associated Press - Thursday, June 2, 2016

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - The Latest on a court filing by Attorney General Roy Cooper involving North Carolina’s transgender law (all times local):

6:10 p.m.

Representatives of North Carolina’s attorney general say he still opposes a law requiring transgender students to use restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificates even though his office sought an extension for the state to respond to a federal lawsuit.

The legal counsel for Gov. Pat McCrory told The Associated Press that Thursday was the deadline to respond to the lawsuit filed by the U.S. Justice Department about the law known as HB2.

Legal counsel Bob Stephens says the governor intended to meet the deadline.

A spokeswoman for Attorney General Roy Cooper’s office says the office filed the request because the attorney general represents the state when it’s sued.

Cooper is a Democrat who’s challenging McCrory, a Republican seeking a second term as governor.

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1:10 p.m.

Attorney General Roy Cooper’s representatives say he remains steadfast in his refusal to defend the state law requiring transgender students to use restrooms matching the sex on their birth certificates.

Cooper campaign spokesman Ford Porter reiterated Cooper’s position Thursday after Gov. Pat McCrory issued a statement saying the attorney general told a federal court Friday that he intended to represent the state. McCrory’s statement called Cooper’s stance a “quiet reversal” on the law known as HB2 that also blocks workers from filing discrimination claims in state court.

Samantha Cole of the Attorney General’s Office says Cooper wanted to make sure the state had time to file a response to the federal complaint. The McCrory administration says it will represent the state. Cole says Cooper supports that.

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12:40 p.m.

A spokesman for Roy Cooper’s gubernatorial campaign says the attorney general remains steadfast in his refusal to defend the state law requiring transgender students to use restrooms matching the sex on their birth certificates.

Campaign spokesman Ford Porter reiterated Cooper’s position Thursday after Gov. Pat McCrory issued a statement saying the attorney general told a federal court Friday that he did intend to represent the state.

Porter said in an email that the federal filing seeks an extension for the state to respond. It wasn’t clear why Cooper would file for the extension and not the attorneys representing the state’s defense of the law known as HB2. It also wasn’t clear why the campaign responded and not Cooper’s office.

The Associated Press left messages for a spokeswoman for Cooper’s office.

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