- Associated Press - Thursday, June 9, 2016

BALTIMORE (AP) - The Latest on the trial of a police van driver in the death of a young black man in Baltimore (all times local):

5 p.m.

The first day of trial for the police wagon driver facing a second-degree murder charge in the death of a young black man has wrapped up after seven witnesses took the stand.

Officer Caesar Goodson also faces manslaughter, assault and other charges in the death of Freddie Gray. His trial began Thursday.

Gray died April 19, a week after his neck was broken in the back of Goodson’s wagon.

Prosecutors say Goodson gave Gray a “rough ride,” and was criminally negligent when he failed to buckle the man in a seat belt and call for medical aid. Goodson’s defense team says he did nothing wrong, and wasn’t aware Gray was in distress.

Goodson’s field training officer Dennis Smith testified that he never taught Goodson how to seat belt combative prisoners. Witnesses have said Gray was screaming and kicking inside the police van.

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3:35 p.m.

A former instructor for an officer on trial for the in-custody death of a 25-year-old black man testified that if a prisoner is in medical distress, an officer should call a medic.

Herbert Reynolds was the state’s second witness in the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, who faces murder, manslaughter and other charges stemming from Freddie Gray’s death. Gray died April 19, a week after his neck was broken in the back of Goodson’s transport wagon.

Reynolds testified that if a prisoner is having a medical emergency officers have a duty to call a medic. But on cross-examination, he acknowledged that if the officer didn’t observe or wasn’t told about a prisoner’s distress, he would have no duty to act.

He testified that officers should always call an ambulance if a prisoner is having an emergency because they are not adequately trained in how to administer aid.

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2:10 p.m.

A police captain who used to oversee the development of Baltimore Police Department policies is testifying in the trial of a police van driver facing a murder charge in the death of a black man who was injured in the van.

The trial for Officer Caesar Goodson, who faces the most serious charge in the death of Freddie Gray, began Thursday.

Capt. Martin Bartness testified that officers are required to ensure the safety of prisoners and buckle them into seat belts.

Prosecutors say Goodson intentionally left Gray unbuckled and gave him a “rough ride,” and was negligent when he failed to get Gray a medic.

Goodson’s defense attorney says Goodson followed the rules, and had no indication Gray needed medical aid. He disputed the accusations of a rough ride.

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1:10 p.m.

Defense attorneys are disputing allegations that a police van driver deliberately injured Freddie Gray by giving the young black man a rough ride in the back of the van.

An attorney for Officer Caesar Goodson said during opening statements Thursday that officers “virtually never” belt prisoners and that Goodson is such a “slow and cautious” driver that he sometimes lulls his prisoners to sleep. He flat-out rejected prosecutors’ accusations of a rough ride, which is police lingo for teaching someone a lesson by putting him in a police wagon without a seat belt and driving erratically so that he is thrown around violently.

Prosecutors say Goodson was grossly negligent when he failed to buckle Gray into a seat belt and call for medical aid during Gray’s 45-minute ride.

Goodson faces second-degree murder and manslaughter charges.

Gray died April 19, 2015, a week after he suffered a critical spinal injury in the back of Goodson’s wagon.

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12:15 p.m.

A prosecutor says a police van driver critically injured a young black man by giving him a ‘rough ride’ in back of a police wagon.

Prosecutor Michael Schatzow made the accusation Thursday during opening statements in the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson. He faces charges of second-degree murder, manslaughter and other charges in the death of Freddie Gray.

Gray died April 19, 2015, a week after he suffered a critical spinal injury in the back of Goodson’s wagon.

Goodson’s faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted of the murder charge. He chose to have a judge, not a jury, decide his case.

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11:15 a.m.

The judge in the trial of an officer charged in the death of a 25-year-old black man whose neck was broken in the back of a police van blasted prosecutors for withholding information from the defense.

Officer Caesar Goodson faces second-degree murder, manslaughter and other charges in the death of Freddie Gray. Gray died April 19, 2015, a week after he suffered a critical spinal injury in the back of Goodson’s wagon.

Goodson’s defense attorneys filed a last-minute motion asking the judge to dismiss the case because prosecutors didn’t disclose that they had a meeting with another man who was in the wagon with Gray. Prosecutors said the meeting didn’t produce new information.

In a hearing, Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams admonished the state and determined that they violated discovery rules. Williams said Chief Deputy State’s Attorney Michael Schatzow has until Monday to turn over any other exculpatory materials or “there will be sanctions.”

The trial is slated to begin with opening statements Thursday.

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8:40 a.m.

The judge in the trial of a police officer charged with murder in the death of a black man whose neck was broken in a police van will hold a hearing on whether prosecutors improperly withheld discussions with a potential witness.

Newly unsealed documents show that Officer Caesar Goodson’s attorneys want Judge Barry Williams to dismiss the case. Williams will hear arguments in the matter Thursday as the trial is set to get underway.

Defense attorneys argue that prosecutors didn’t notify them that they met with a second man who was in the police van. Prosecutors say they did meet with the man, but they say the meeting didn’t produce new information and they don’t plan to call him as a witness.

Goodson, who chose a bench trial, is charged with second-degree murder, manslaughter, assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment charges stemming from the death of Freddie Gray. Prosecutors say Goodson was ultimately responsible for Gray’s well-being.

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3:45 a.m.

The trial for a police officer charged with murder in the death of a 25-year-old black man whose neck was broken in the back of a transport wagon is slated to begin.

Officer Caesar Goodson faces second-degree murder, manslaughter, assault, misconduct in office and reckless endangerment charges stemming from the death of Freddie Gray.

Prosecutors say Goodson was ultimately responsible for Gray’s well-being and was so negligent in failing to call a medic for Gray or buckle the man into a seat belt that his inaction amounts to a crime.

Goodson waived his right to a jury trial and instead will leave his fate up to Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams.

Gray died April 19 of last year, a week after he suffered a critical spinal injury in Goodson’s wagon.

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