- Associated Press - Wednesday, March 2, 2016

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - The Latest on former Chesapeake Energy Chief Executive Officer Aubrey McClendon, who was killed in a car crash one day after he was indicted by a federal grand jury (all times local):

10 p.m.

The NBA and Oklahoma City Thunder are mourning the death of Aubrey McClendon, the former energy executive and part owner of the Thunder who died in a car crash.

Thunder head coach Billy Donovan says he addressed the team after learning of McClendon’s death Tuesday.

Donovan says McClendon was a “very generous guy” who always treated him well.

McClendon is survived by his wife, Katie, and three children.

An NBA spokesman offered condolences to McClendon’s family in statement.

The wreck happened a day after a federal grand jury indicted McClendon for allegedly conspiring to rig bids for oil and natural gas leases in northwest Oklahoma. Oklahoma City Police Capt. Paco Balderrama says it’s too early to tell whether the crash was intentional.

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4 p.m.

Police say former Chesapeake CEO Aubrey McClendon wasn’t wearing a seat belt when his SUV slammed into a concrete embankment and burst into flames in Oklahoma City, killing him.

Oklahoma City Police Capt. Paco Balderrama also says McClendon was traveling above the speed limit of 50 mph when his sport utility vehicle crossed the center line and crashed Wednesday. The 56-year-old energy executive and part-owner of the Oklahoma City Thunder NBA team was the only person in the vehicle.

The crash happened a day after a federal grand jury indicted McClendon for allegedly conspiring to rig bids for oil and natural gas leases in northwest Oklahoma.

Balderrama says it’s too early to tell whether the crash was intentional. He says the state medical examiner’s office will determine the cause of death.

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3:20 p.m.

Condolences are pouring in from Oklahoma leaders following the death of energy executive Aubrey McClendon in a single-car crash in Oklahoma City.

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett remembered McClendon for his civic pride and his support of local charities, arts and local organizations.

Energy tycoon T. Boone Pickens described McClendon as “charismatic and a true American entrepreneur.”

Oklahoma State University President Burns Hargis described him as “one of the most visionary and brilliant people I’ve ever met.”

Members of the Oklahoma House paused their floor session on Wednesday to deliver a prayer for McClendon’s family.

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3 p.m.

An Oklahoma City police spokesman says a former energy executive was speeding and “drove straight into the wall” when he was killed in a single-car crash.

Capt. Paco Balderrama says Aubrey McClendon crossed the center line, drove into a grassy area and crashed into a wall at about 9 a.m. Wednesday. Balderrama says there was “plenty of opportunity” for McClendon to correct himself and get back on the road, but that didn’t happen.

Police are still investigating the single-vehicle crash.

McClendon was the former chief executive officer of Chesapeake Energy Corp.

A federal grand jury indicted him Tuesday for allegedly conspiring to rig bids to buy oil and natural gas leases in northwest Oklahoma. A Department of Justice spokesman declined to comment Wednesday on the status of the case.

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2:15 p.m.

Oklahoma City police say Aubrey McClendon, a natural gas industry titan who was indicted on Tuesday by a federal grand jury, has been killed in a fiery single-car crash in Oklahoma City.

Police Sgt. Ashley Peters says 56-year-old McClendon was the only occupant in the sport utility vehicle when it slammed into a concrete bridge pillar shortly after 9 a.m. Wednesday.

McClendon’s death follows an announcement Tuesday that he had been indicted for allegedly conspiring to rig bids to buy oil and natural gas leases in northwest Oklahoma.

Police say it’s too early to tell if the collision was intentional.

A part-owner of the NBA’s Oklahoma City Thunder, McClendon stepped down in 2013 at Chesapeake and founded American Energy Partners, where he was chairman and CEO.

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