- Associated Press - Thursday, May 5, 2016

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) - The Latest on Atlantic City’s finances (all times local):

6 p.m.

Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto says he will try again on a new Atlantic City bill he hopes can be approved in his chamber by next Wednesday.

Prieto says he polled members of his caucus Thursday asking if anyone would vote for a rival Atlantic City aid bill passed by the Senate and favored by Gov. Chris Christie.

He says not one hand was raised.

Prieto says some of the benchmarks his original bill would have set can be shortened, and the amount the bill seeks to force Atlantic City to cut could be changed to make it more acceptable to the governor.

4:30 p.m.

Gov. Chris Christie says he hopes the failure of an Atlantic City bill to come up for a vote Thursday will lead lawmakers to get beyond the political drama and support a measure he backs.

A vote on the Assembly measure supported by Democratic Speaker Vincent Prieto to give Atlantic City two years to fix its finances before a state takeover was canceled Thursday. Christie and Senate President Steve Sweeney are insisting on their own plan.

The bills differ in how long they would give Atlantic City to stabilize its finances before the state would take over.

Christie says Atlantic City could run out of cash in 10 days.

He says Prieto’s measure was bad public policy that he never thought would get enough support to be passed.

___

3:40 p.m.

Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto says a planned vote on his legislation to give Atlantic City two years to fix its finances before a state takeover has been canceled.

Prieto’s bill was originally expected to be voted on Thursday. But Senate President Steve Sweeney is insisting on his own measure, which is backed by Republican Gov. Chris Christie.

The bills differ in how long they would give Atlantic City to stabilize its finances before the state would take over.

Prieto says a voting session is set for Wednesday. He did not stop to answer a reporter’s questions

Christie is set to host a 4:15 p.m. press conference to discuss Atlantic City.

Atlantic City could run out of cash within days.

___

3 p.m.

State Senate President Steve Sweeney denies there will be a meeting Friday to seek a compromise deal to save Atlantic City from going broke.

Sweeney spoke shortly after the Democratic Assembly Majority Leader Louis Greenwald told reporters that Sweeney and Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto would meet Friday to seek a compromise on two dueling versions of an Atlantic City aid package.

Sweeney flatly denied that, saying no meeting is scheduled.

The statement threw the day’s events into even deeper chaos, as the Assembly still has not voted on Prieto’s version of an aid bill.

Even if it passes, Sweeney has declared it is dead on arrival in the Senate.

Atlantic City could run out of cash within days.

___

2 p.m.

Leaders of the New Jersey Legislature will meet Friday to try to agree on a deal to help prevent Atlantic City from going broke.

Shortly before one of two rival aid bills was to be heard in the state Assembly Thursday, Assemblyman Louis Greenwald said Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto and Senate President Steve Sweeney will meet Friday in search of a compromise that has eluded the Democrats.

Prieto’s bill was still expected to be voted on Thursday. But even if it passes, it is considered to be dead on arrival in the Senate, where Sweeney is insisting on his own measure. Sweeney’s measure is backed by Republican Gov. Chris Christie.

The bills differ in how long they would give Atlantic City to stabilize its finances before the state would take over.

___

12:20 a.m.

New Jersey lawmakers will try again to help Atlantic City avoid going broke.

But nothing is likely to be resolved Thursday.

Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto will put his version of an Atlantic City aid bill up for a vote. But even if it passes, Senate president Steve Sweeney, a fellow Democrat, vows not to put it up for a vote in the Senate.

Sweeney is holding out for his own Atlantic City aid bill, which is backed by Republican Gov. Chris Christie. It gives the city 130 days to stabilize its finances, compared to two years under the Assembly bill.

Should Prieto’s own bill fail, he still won’t put Sweeney’s bill up for a vote Thursday.

Reeling from the contraction of its casino industry, Atlantic City is nearly broke.

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