- Associated Press - Thursday, October 13, 2016

MADISON, Wis. (AP) - The Latest on the court battle surrounding a Wisconsin program that issues voting credentials to people who lack photo identification (all times local):

1:10 p.m.

State attorneys won’t appeal a federal judge’s order to produce documents that clearly explain Wisconsin’s alternative voting credential system.

U.S. District Judge James Peterson on Thursday ordered the state to produce a one-page explanation of the process as well as a document applicants can take away explaining what happens and distribute the documents to media and voting groups by Monday. Peterson also ordered state attorneys and lawyers for liberal group One Wisconsin Institute to develop a public information campaign on the process by next week.

State Justice Department spokesman Johnny Koremenos said Thursday the agency won’t seek a stay of Peterson’s order and won’t appeal it.

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11:10 a.m.

A federal judge has ordered the state to produce documents that clearly explain Wisconsin’s system for getting voting credentials to people who lack photo identification.

U.S. District Judge James Peterson ordered the Department of Transportation on Thursday to produce a one-page explanation of the process as well as a document applicants can take away explaining what happens. He ordered that the documents be distributed to media, voting groups and municipal clerks. He wants those documents ready for distribution on Monday.

He also ordered state attorneys and lawyers with liberal advocacy group One Wisconsin Institute to develop a public information campaign on the credential process by the end of next week.

Peterson issued the order in the wake of media reports that showed Division of Motor Vehicles workers have been giving people erroneous information about how the credentialing process works.

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9:35 a.m.

A federal judge, state attorneys and lawyers for a liberal advocacy group are starting to hammer out how to improve the state’s system for getting voting credentials in the hands of people who lack photo identification.

State law requires voters to show photo ID at the polls. People who lack supporting documents can apply for alternative credentials at Division of Motor Vehicle offices. Anyone who applies is supposed to get the credentials in the mail within days.

But media reports show DMV workers have received little training on the credentials and have been giving applicants inaccurate information.

U.S. District Judge James Peterson, state Justice Department attorneys and One Wisconsin Institute began meeting Thursday to hammer out how to get more information out about the process.

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