- The Washington Times - Monday, April 10, 2017

Pro-police author Heather Mac Donald slammed the “outbreak of student totalitarianism” after her speech at Claremont McKenna College in California was shut down by leftist protesters last week.

Ms. Mac Donald, author of “The War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe,” was forced to live-stream her speech Thursday night after hundreds of students and activists blocked the entrance to the Claremont school’s Athenaeum and prevented people from entering.

“It was another outbreak of student totalitarianism,” Ms. Mac Donaldsaid Sunday on “Fox & Friends.”

“It was announced on Facebook two days before that they were going to shut me down — they called me the white supremacist racist-fascist Heather Mac Donald — and they basically succeeded in doing so,” she continued. “They surrounded the building where I was supposed to speak and prevented any students from entering.

“So the real issue is not only are they shutting me down, but they’re using brute force to prevent other people from hearing a point of view that is basically not allowed on campuses,” she said.

Ms. Mac Donald, a Manhattan Institute scholar, said her viewpoint considered too “outrageous” to the protesting students was that “there is no government agency more dedicated to the proposition that ‘black lives matter’ than the police.”

“The police have saved tens of thousands of minority males over the last two decades thanks to constitutional proactive policing,” she argued.

Ms. Mac Donald said the protesters have probably spent very little time in the inner cities and probably “have no experience of gun violence.”

“They’re clueless about the degree of dysfunction,” she said. “The discussion about inner-city crime has been so taboo that these kids actually don’t know it, and for that I blame the faculty.

“This is time for the faculty to wake up,” she said. “We are graduating a bunch of neo-totalitarianism and they’re going to take control of power. And they’re firmly convinced that a certain point of view is a form of violence and they’re therefore entitled to use violence to shut it down.”

Video from Thursday’s protest showed students dressed in black chanting, “Black lives matter,” “F— the police, from Oakland to Greece,” and “How do you spell fascism? CMC!”

The school’s official student newspaper, The Forum, reported that Ms. Mac Donald’s discussion lasted 31 minutes before she was evacuated through the back door of the Athenaeum. Protesters at the entrance attempted to prevent her from entering a vehicle, but the Claremont Police Department escorted her off-campus, The Forum reported.

School administrators strongly condemned the students for blocking access to Ms. Mac Donald’s speech.

“Questions about policing, police brutality, crime, and race matter a lot to our society,” Dean of Faculty Peter Uvin wrote in a email to the CMC community, obtained by The Forum. “Yet precisely because these issues are so important, we must be able to debate them, to acknowledge that there exist different analyses and life experiences about these matters, and to listen carefully to each other.

The school’s president, Hiram Chodosh, pointed out that the protesters’ efforts actually ended up helping Ms. Mac Donald’s speech reach a wider audience by forcing it to go online.

“Notwithstanding these efforts to stifle a speaker, Heather Mac Donald was able to give her presentation to a small audience at the Athenaeum,” she wrote in an email, The Forum reported. “We also live-streamed her talk. Nearly 250 people viewed the presentation live, and her presentation that is posted on our CMC homepage has already been viewed over 1,400 times. In the end, the effort to silence her voice effectively amplified it to a much larger audience.”

“Blocking access to buildings violates College policy. CMC students who are found to have violated policies will be held accountable,” she said.

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