- The Washington Times - Wednesday, August 16, 2017

The NFL accused the league’s players’ association of “spreading derogatory information” about Tiffany Thompson, the accuser in the Ezekiel Elliott domestic violence case, on Wednesday, an accusation the NFLPA denied.

In a statement posted to Twitter, NFL executive vice president of communications Joe Lockhart said the NFLPA was using “shameful” tactics to “prove the innocence of the accused by discrediting the victim.”

The statement was released after Yahoo Sports reported Wednesday that Thompson told NFL investigators she and a friend had discussed via text blackmailing Elliott over sex tapes featuring her and the Cowboys running back. The article cited documents found in the NFL’s 160-page report of the investigation into whether Elliott committed domestic violence.

In response to the NFL’s statement, the NFLPA called the league’s accusation a “lie.”

“We know the League office has a history of being exposed for its lack of credibility,” the NFLPA said in a statement. “This is another example of the NFL’s hypocrisy on display and an attempt to create a sideshow to distract from their own failings in dealing with such serious issues. They should be ashamed for stooping to new lows.”

The NFLPA’s Twitter account also quote-tweeted the NFL’s statement and asked, “Where are the receipts? We’ll wait.” That tweet was deleted. A previous tweet that also quote-tweeted the NFL’s statements said,” The public statement issued on behalf of every NFL owner is a lie. The NFLPA categorically denies the accusations made in this statement.” That tweet remained up.

The NFLPA announced Tuesday that it would appeal Elliott’s six-game suspension, after the league cited “substantial and persuasive evidence” that Elliott had committed domestic violence in violation of the NFL’s personal conduct policy.

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