- Associated Press - Monday, February 27, 2017

PHOENIX (AP) - The Latest on the trial of a military veteran who filed a medical-negligence lawsuit against the Veterans Administration (all times local):

2:15 p.m.

A lawyer for a military veteran says at a trial Monday that his client’s now-terminal prostate cancer would have been curable had the Veterans Administration in Phoenix diagnosed his illness sooner.

Steven Cooper says a nurse practitioner who found abnormalities in his prostate during a 2011 examination failed to order more testing.

Cooper learned 11 months later that he had stage-IV cancer. Attorney Gregory Patton says his client’s life expectancy is about five years.

The government contends the VA complied with the standard of care.

Phoenix was the epicenter of a national scandal in which whistleblowers revealed that veterans on secret waiting lists faced scheduling delays of up to a year.

No direct references to the scandal were made during opening arguments.

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8:30 a.m.

A trial is set to begin Monday in a lawsuit by a military veteran who alleges his now-terminal prostate cancer would have been curable had the Veterans Administration hospital in Phoenix discovered his illness sooner.

Steven Cooper contends in his lawsuit that a nurse practitioner at the VA hospital should have ordered additional tests and referred him to a urologist when he had complained of health problems in 2011.

The lawsuit says Cooper’s condition worsened over the next year, prompting him to return to the VA.

Eventually, a biopsy determined he had stage-four cancer.

He then went to a private doctor for treatment.

Lawyers defending the VA say the nurse practitioner’s examination didn’t turn up indications of cancer and that Cooper didn’t complain of urinary symptoms during the appointment.

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