- The Washington Times - Monday, March 20, 2017

When the Bee Gee’s released their 70s disco dance anthem “Stayin’ Alive”, one can imagine they didn’t expect that people could actually use the melody to stay alive.

But the song has long been a teaching method for CPR administrators. Its 100 beats per minute is the appropriate amount of times to administer compressions to someone suffering cardiac arrest.

To bring awareness to more people about the potential to save lives, New York Presbyterian Hospital released a list of 39 additional songs that all clock in at 100 BPMs.

There’s a song for every genre, from disco classics like Abba’s “Dancing Queen,” 80’s pop-rock like The Bangles “Walk Like an Egyptian”, or 90s pop classics including Hanson’s “Mmm Bop”, Backstreet Boy’s “Quit Playing Games with my Heart”, or Mariah Carey’s “HeartBreaker.”

While Queen’s “Another one bites the dust” also made the playlist, it might not be the best mood-lifter in a tense situation.

New York Presbyterian recommends that hands-only CPR is best to administer if a teenager or adult collapses suddenly, signifying cardiac arrest. Physical compressions help the heart continue blood flow throughout the body, getting at least the remaining oxygen to the brain. The hospital offers a 60-second video tutorial with three main guidelines. First, check if the victim is responsive. If you don’t see any signs of breathing, ask someone in the vicinity to dial 911 or do it yourself. Next, place one hand on top of the other in the center of the chest and begin compressions, pushing down about two inches, hard and swift, keeping to 100 beats per minute. Humming the songs listed above helps keep pace.

Heart disease is the number one cause of death in the United States and out of the hospital, nearly 400,000 people suffer sudden cardiac arrest. Acting quickly and applying CPR can help save a life.

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