- The Washington Times - Thursday, September 21, 2017

These ladies are poised to stand up for traditional values and the power of unapologetic motherhood — intended as push back, they say, to the “radical feminist” agenda. Welcome to the “Mom’s March for America,” set for Saturday at a major arena in Omaha, Nebraska — with a speakers roster that includes former Gov. Sarah Palin and Candy Carson,wife of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson. Their public message has not been heard much these days.

“As the mothers, primary makers of the homes of America and molders of the future of our nation, we declare that the liberty and freedom of all people begin in the home and that a nation is but a magnified home. The values and virtues taught within the family will determine the values and virtues of the nation as a whole,” states a Declaration of Mothers, the guiding document for the event.

“We recognize the sacred role of mother as the heart of the home and home as the heart of society. The liberty of each individual begins in the home and parents are, first and foremost, the primary teachers and protectors of their children in a free society,” the document states.

Close to 350 local “Mom’s Marches” are also scheduled in all 50 states; the effort has support from such interest groups as Concerned Women for America, Enough is Enough, and the late Phyllis Schlafly’s Eagles.

“The Mom’s March isn’t about politics, parties, or presidents. It’s about standing for, and promoting, the principles and values America was founded on — the principles and values that made us the freest, most prosperous nation on earth,” advises Kimberly Fletcher, founder of Homemakers of America, a mother of eight and the principal organizer of the event.

“Mom’s March for America is a movement, uniting mothers across the nation to stand for truth, family and freedom. It is a celebration of the biggest cultural movement happening in America — the march that mothers make every day in their homes, neighborhoods, and businesses as they nurture their families, influence their communities and shape our nation,” she adds.

The event will be livestreamed Saturday from Momsmarchusa.com beginning at 2 p.m. EDT.

TRUMP TWEAKS GLOBAL ELITE

President Trump has vexed the “elite” crowd on these shores for quite some time. His reach has now expanded.

“Trump’s straight talk at The United Nations disturbs the global elite,” writes Megan G. Oprea, who cites the president’s speech this week before the diplomats, his new “Rocket Man” nickname for Kim Jong-un, and his threat to go the distance to protect the U.S. and its allies.

“The mainstream media, liberal elites, and the international community have been doing a lot of handwringing about Trump’s rhetoric and his talk of going it alone. They also had a lot to say about his comments concerning the Iran nuclear deal, whose dissolution the president has long desired,” Ms. Oprea observes. “Although the focus was on Trump’s supposedly dangerous isolationism and nationalism, what’s really upsetting them is that he dared to say what no one is supposed to say: that the U.N. is broken and that it is unrealistic and dangerous to have a world without borders and without national sovereignty. In other words, Trump violated the Emperor Has No Clothes rule.”

THE WORRY FACTOR

“Americans continue to cite dissatisfaction with government above all others as the United States’ top problem,” reports Gallup polling analyst Megan Brenan, citing new findings that place the faulty government in first place, followed by concern over racism, immigration and lack of unity in America.

Health care, the economy and North Korea were tied for fifth, followed by unemployment, the moral decline of the nation and natural disaster relief.

A TRUMP PROMISE KEPT

“It’s no accident that Washington, D.C., has become known as the graveyard of promises. It’s exceedingly rare that a promise made in the nation’s capital is a promise kept. That’s why it’s great to report that President Trump has kept a big one — to cut two regulations for every new one passed,” reports an Investors Business Daily editorial, citing a new American Action Forum analysis which determined that the Trump administration is on track to finish the first phase of regulatory reform program with $645 million in net annual regulatory savings.

“That might not sound like much in a federal budget usually denominated in the trillions of dollars. But consider this: During President Obama’s years in office, more than 22,700 regulations were imposed on Americans at an astounding cost to American consumers, businesses and workers,” the editorial noted.

FOXIFIED

Fox News Channel has finished crafting what appears to be a winning prime time lineup. This week, the network announced that veteran political analyst Sean Hannity would take over the critical 9 p.m. hour, placing his show opposite Rachel Maddow‘s program on MSNBC, Fox News also revealed that contributor Laura Ingraham would take over the 10 p.m. hour.

And 11 p. m.? That now belongs to Shannon Bream, who will host a live news and analysis show simply titled “Fox News @ Night.” She has been with the network for a decade. The programming changes begin Oct. 30.

WEEKEND REAL ESTATE

For sale: Snow White’s Cottage, built in 1982 on five acres near Ollala, Washington, as a custom-crafted duplicate of the home which appeared in Disney’s classic “Snow White.” Four bedrooms, five baths; 2,800 square feet. Eccentric details include high pitched roofs, stone and stucco walls, hand-hewn wooden beams, stained glass windows, storybook interiors, round doors, tree house, wooden bridge. Extensive landscaping, fruit trees. Priced at $775,000 through RickEllis.JohnLscott.com. Find the home here.

POLL DU JOUR

95 percent of Canadians say drivers who text and drive make them feel unsafe on the roads.

88 percent have witnessed other drivers texting while driving; 22 percent admit to doing that themselves.

78 percent approve technology which would disable texting functions on a driver’s device when the driver is behind the wheel.

48 percent say increased fines or penalties would help curb driver texting; 32 percent say “peer pressure” would be an effective deterrent.

Source: An Aviva/Pollara poll of 1,504 Canadian adults conducted August 8-13 and released Thursday.

• Follow Jennifer Harper on Twitter @HarperBulletin

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