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A new EPA proposal would lower the current national ozone standard for automobiles from 75 parts per billion (ppb) to 65 or 70 ppb. Environmentalist are calling for even more stringent pollution caps. (Associated Press)

EPA to release new regulations to restrict ground-level ozone

- The Washington Times

President Obama on Thursday is expected to take what many expect to be the most costly and contentious step in his ambitious environmental agenda — the release of a gargantuan set of federal regulations to restrict ground-level ozone in the name of protecting Americans’ health.

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President Obama's meeting with King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud comes as debate over the Iran nuclear deal rages in Washington. (Associated Press)

King Salman of Saudi Arabia set to back Iran nuclear deal -- at a price

- The Washington Times

President Obama is set to receive an official, albeit reluctant nod of approval for the Iran nuclear deal when Saudi Arabia's new king visits the White House for the first time Friday, but analysts say it will come at a price as Riyadh seeks Washington's support for its increasingly anti-Iran foreign policy in the Middle East.

President Obama's intense lobbying on Wednesday secured support from a 34th Senate Democrat, ensuring his Iranian nuclear deal will survive a veto battle with Congress. (Associated Press)

Obama secures votes to preserve Iran nuclear deal despite majority opposition

- The Washington Times

President Obama's intense lobbying on Wednesday secured support from a 34th Senate Democrat, ensuring his Iranian nuclear deal will survive a veto battle with Congress and setting into motion the extraordinary imposition of a foreign agreement over the objections of large numbers of voters and big majorities in both the House and Senate.

With melting glaciers and rising seas as his backdrop, President Obama will visit Alaska this week to press for action to combat climate change in a state whose economy and jobs depend heavily on the oil business. (Associated Press)

Alaskans concerned Obama visit a ploy to highlight green legacy

- The Washington Times

President Obama on Monday will begin a three-day trip to Alaska to hike on a glacier and call attention to climate change, amid concern from Alaskans and the oil and gas industry that the president merely wants to use the resource-rich state as backdrop to burnish his legacy as an environmentalist.

Saudi-U.S. ties will be under scrutiny again when 79-year-old King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud makes an expected visit to Washington next month, his first since ascending to the throne. (Associated Press)

Saudi royals' grasp on power threatened by sharp drop in oil prices

- The Washington Times

The sharp drop in oil prices is starting to bite for the world's longtime top oil-producing nation, Saudi Arabia, and could threaten the seemingly unshakable social contract that has seen the kingdom's royal family rule for nearly a century with almost no opposition or oversight from the nation's masses.

President Obama said he wanted inspections "anywhere, anytime" of Iran's nuclear facilities to ensure Tehran is adhering to terms of the deal. But the actual agreement? Iran gets 24 days' notice of inspections of suspicious sites. A secret side deal allows Tehran's own inspectors to check a military site where work on nuclear weapons was thought to have been carried out. (Associated Press)

Iran nuke deal erases Obama's red lines

- The Washington Times

From allowing Iran to keep enriching uranium to abandoning "anywhere, anytime" inspections of Tehran's nuclear facilities, the Obama administration has crossed many of its own red lines in the nuclear deal that will lift tough economic sanctions on America's longtime adversary.

California green failure a warning for states facing Clean Power Plan

In the eyes of the Obama administration, California is the gold standard for state energy policy. The feds lavishly laud the Golden State's aggressive green energy mandates and stringent energy efficiency requirements. But few states have jumped on California's green energy bandwagon -- and with good reason.

A Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015 photo from files showing Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, during a press conference at the Lebanese foreign ministry in Beirut, Lebanon. An unusual secret agreement with a U.N. agency will allow Iran to use its own experts to inspect a site allegedly used to develop nuclear arms, according to a document seen by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein, File)

U.N. side deal lets Iran lead its own nuclear inspections

- The Washington Times

In a development that incited more opposition in Congress to the Obama administration's nuclear deal, the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency has given Iran the rare benefit of using its own analysts to inspect a site where it is suspected of working on atomic weapons.