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President Obama meets with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Washington, D.C., to discuss bilateral trade relations and the possibility of reviving nuclear energy talks, however, India's liability laws may scuttle such plans. Mr. Modi maintained he is open to changing those laws. (Associated Press)

Nuclear liability laws strain U.S.-India energy policy

- The Washington Times

President Obama and his Indian counterpart pledged Tuesday to cooperate on nuclear energy, but specialists say Indian liability laws have made progress virtually impossible and have rendered moot a landmark 2008 agreement between the two countries.

FILE - In this April 3, 2014 file photo giant machines dig for brown coal at the open-cast mining Garzweiler in front of a smoking power plant near the city of Grevenbroich in western Germany.  The U.N. weather agency says carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere reached a record high in 2013. The World Meteorological Organization says the heat-trapping gas blamed for global warming was at global concentrations of 396 parts per million last year. That is an increase of 2.9 ppm from the previous year, which the Geneva-based agency reported Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014 was the biggest year-to-year change in three decades. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)

Climate skeptics push back over new rise in carbon

- The Washington Times

The World Meteorological Organization warned this week that concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere reached a new high last year, but critics of climate change alarmism say that’s not necessarily a bad thing but instead a reflection of economic progress around the world.

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This June 2013 photo shows an overview of Sendai nuclear power plant complex in Sendai, Kagoshima Prefecture, southern Japan. The plant in southern Japan won regulators’ approval Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014 for meeting safety requirements imposed after the 2011 Fukushima disaster, a key step toward becoming the first reactor to restart under the tighter rules.  (AP Photo/Kyodo News) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

Japanese nuclear plant clears safety hurdle

- Associated Press

A nuclear power plant in southern Japan won regulators' approval Wednesday under new safety standards imposed after the 2011 Fukushima disaster, a key step toward becoming the first to restart under the tighter rules.

FILE - This Sept. 4, 2011, file photo, shows the main plant facility at the Navajo Generating Station, as seen from Lake Powell in Page, Ariz. Two of the power plants on the Navajo Nation, the Navajo Generating Station in Page and the Four Corners Power Plant near Farmington, N.M., are among the country's top emitters of carbon dioxide, releasing 17.8 million short tons and 12.9 million short tons in 2013, respectively. Both have plans to shutter some of the generating units, which will cut down on carbon dioxide emissions that are blamed for heating the planet. The U.S. administration on Monday, June 2, 2014, unveiled its plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. power plants by 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

UN says CO2 pollution levels at annual record high

- Associated Press

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere reached a record high in 2013 as increasing levels of man-made pollution transform the planet, the U.N. weather agency said Tuesday.

FILE - In this Wednesday, June 4, 2014 file photo, Marty Mascio of Pembroke Pines, Fla., selects a grade of gasoline as he fills up his car at a Chevron station in Pembroke Pines. Lifting restrictions on exports of crude oil from the U.S. would benefit the U.S. economy and lead to a slight dip in gasoline prices, according to a study released Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)

Study: Want lower gas prices? Ship more oil abroad

- Associated Press

Exporting more U.S. crude around the world would lower the price of gasoline for U.S. drivers and benefit the U.S. economy, according to a new study released Tuesday.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, takes questions from John Podesta, counselor to President Barack Obama, at the National Clean Energy Summit Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Hillary Clinton: US should lead on clean energy

- Associated Press

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Thursday the U.S. should become what she called the world's 21st-century clean energy superpower, during remarks resembling both a campaign speech and a call to action at the annual National Clean Energy Summit in Las Vegas.

FILE - In this April 4, 2013 file photo, a mechanized shovel loads coal onto a haul truck at the Cloud Peak Energy's Spring Creek mine near Decker, Mont. Coal industry representatives say lawsuits against mines in the West could have consequences across the U.S. as environmentalists seek changes in how mining is approved on federally-owned reserves. In civil cases unfolding in Colorado, New Mexico and Montana, the group WildEarth Guardians asserts coal companies benefited from lax oversight by federal regulators.(AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

Montana coal mine deal aims to boost Asian exports

- Associated Press

Coal companies announced an agreement Thursday to consolidate ownership of a Montana mine in a deal aimed at boosting exports of the fuel to Asia through ports on the U.S. West Coast.

Ruling could cost BP added $18B; stock slumps

- Associated Press

A judge's ruling in the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill case that could cost BP an additional $17.6 billion in fines sent the company's shares tumbling Thursday.

San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane speaks at a news conference at City Hall in San Bruno, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. California regulatory judges issued a $1.4 billion penalty against Pacific Gas & Electric Co., the state's largest utility, for a lethal 2010 gas pipeline explosion that engulfed a San Mateo neighborhood in flames, killing eight people and prompting national alerts about the oversight of aging pipelines. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

PG&E plans to appeal $1.4B penalty in deadly blast

- Associated Press

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. plans to appeal a $1.4 billion penalty recommended by California regulatory judges for a gas pipeline explosion in a San Francisco suburb that killed eight people, the utility said in a filing Wednesday with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

** FILE ** The exterior of the Arak heavy water production facility in Arak, Iran, 360 kms southwest of Tehran, is seen on in this Oct. 27, 2004, file photo. Seven international envoys are getting a look inside two key Iranian nuclear sites in a tour that Tehran hopes will build support ahead of more talks on its disputed atomic work. The envoys will see the unfinished heavy water reactor near Arak on Saturday, Jan. 15, 2011, and the uranium enrichment facility near Natanz later. (AP Photo/Fars News Agancy)

Report: Iran redesigning reactor as part of deal

Associated Press

Iran's nuclear chief said Wednesday that workers have begun redesigning its nearly completed Arak heavy water reactor to limit the amount of plutonium it can make as part of the country's interim deal over its nuclear program with world powers.

The coal-fired Plant Scherer is shown in operation early Sunday, June 1, 2014, in Juliette, Ga. The Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third over the next 15 years, in a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming. (AP Photo/John Amis)

UN panel: Global warming human-caused, dangerous

- Associated Press

Global warming is here, human-caused and probably already dangerous — and it's increasingly likely that the heating trend could be irreversible, a draft of a new international science report says.

In this Friday, Aug. 8, 2014 photo, farmer Adiya, right, stands in front of a pond of waste water near a state-of-the-art power plant that turns millions of tons of coal every year into methane in northern China's Inner Mongolia province. As a boy growing up there, Adiya could ride his horse through waist-high grass for miles without meeting another person. Now, the 32-year-old says he stays indoors some mornings because of the industrial stench. Since the plant started running in December, it has obscured the blue skies above Adiya’s home with smoke while black pools of wastewater have turned up in the grasslands. “I only wish they could build this factory in Beijing,” said Adiya, who uses only one name, as is Mongolian custom. (AP Photo/Jack Chang)

Coal gas boom in China holds climate change risks

- Associated Press

Deep in the hilly grasslands of remote Inner Mongolia, twin smoke stacks rise more than 200 feet into the sky, their steam and sulfur billowing over herds of sheep and cattle. Both day and night, the rumble of this power plant echoes across the ancient steppe, and its acrid stench travels dozens of miles away.

The Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies. (Image: Los Alamos National Laboratories)

Scientists urge rehiring of fired nuke lab worker

Associated Press

A group of scientists who work to limit the spread of nuclear weapons is urging the U.S. Energy Secretary to intervene on behalf of a fired Los Alamos National Laboratory worker.

In this June 9, 2014 photo, an oil and gas rig on a well pad is visible at right, adjacent to a ranch in New Castle, a small farming and ranching settlement on the Western Slope of the Rockies, in Colo. Four in 10 new oil and gas wells near national forests and fragile watersheds or otherwise identified as higher pollution risks escape federal inspection, unchecked by an agency struggling to keep pace with America's drilling boom, according to an Associated Press review that shows wide state-by-state disparities in safety checks. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

US rig count down 17 to 1,896

Associated Press

Oilfield services company Baker Hughes Inc. says the number of rigs exploring for oil and natural gas in the U.S. fell 17 this week to 1,896.