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Jacob Lew says U.S. will still curb Iran economy if nuclear deal passes

- The Washington Times

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said Wednesday the Obama administration intends to “redouble” its efforts to target Iranian government support for terrorism and regional destabilization activities — even as nuclear sanctions on Tehran are being lifted under the major accord reached with world powers this month.

FILE - In this March 16, 2011, file photo, exhaust rises from smokestacks in front of piles of coal in Thompsons, Texas. A federal appeals court on Tuesday ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to relax some limits it set on smokestack emissions that cross state lines and taint downwind areas with air pollution from power plants they can't control.  (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Obama ordered to rewrite pollution rules

- The Washington Times

President Obama’s environmental agenda suffered another loss in court Tuesday when a federal appeals panel ordered the administration to rewrite rules limiting cross-state pollution.

Syed Tariq Fatemi, special assistant on foreign affairs to Pakistan's prime minister, said his country is in constant contact with Iran about prospects for commercial ties. (Associated Press)

Pakistan banking on Iran trade bonanza after Obama nuclear deal

- The Washington Times

NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: The lifting of economic sanctions on Iran will open “massive trade” opportunities for Pakistan and could effectively transform the energy markets of South Asia by paving the way for a long-awaited gas pipeline across the Iranian-Pakistani border, said a top Pakistani diplomat, expressing his nation’s deep hope that the Obama administration’s nuclear deal with Tehran goes into effect as soon as possible.

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Democratic presidential hopeful and former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley speaks to local residents at a house party in New Castle, N.H., on June 13, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Martin O'Malley: Climate change can boost job growth

- The Washington Times

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, who has recently called for the United States to be using 100 percent clean energy by 2050, said over the weekend in Iowa that climate change is actually a business opportunity that can spur job growth.

FILE - In this April 3, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama walks through a solar array at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, to speak about clean energy. The growth of renewable energy outpaced that of fossil fuels in the electricity sector last year, with a record 135 gigawatts of capacity added from wind, solar, hydropower and other natural sources, a new study shows. The annual report released early Thursday, June 18, 2015 in Europe by Paris-based REN21, a non-profit group that promotes renewable energy, underscored how China, the world’s top consumer of coal, has become a global leader in clean energy, too. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Solar, wind projects could cost taxpayers millions: report

- The Washington Times

Lawmakers on Wednesday demanded accountability from the Obama administration after an investigation found the federal government routinely fails to secure proper bonding from wind and solar project developers, potentially leaving taxpayers on the hook for millions of dollars.

Colorado coal town uses beer boycott to fight mine closure

- The Washington Times

Jana Venzke is fighting the war on coal here in northwest Colorado -- one bottle of craft beer at a time. Last week, she pulled every New Belgium and Breckenridge label from the shelves at her store, A1 Liquors, after finding their names on a list of businesses that contribute to WildEarth Guardians, the anti-coal group whose lawsuit threatens to shutter the local Colowyo Mine, taking 220 jobs with it.

Claire Harrison, of Alpharetta, Ga., protests the Environmental Protection Agency during a July 29, 2014, rally in Atlanta in response to an EPA hearing on tougher pollution restrictions. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Court tosses challenge to EPA carbon rules

- The Washington Times

A federal appeals court on Tuesday threw out lawsuits challenging the Obama administration's controversial plan to limit carbon emissions on existing power plants, paving the way for the rules to go into effect before the president leaves office.