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Oil can be seen in the Gulf of Mexico, more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, as a large plume of smoke rises from fires on BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig in this April 2010 file photo. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Gulf states reach $18.7B settlement with BP over oil spill

- Associated Press

BP and five Gulf states announced a massive settlement Thursday that resolves years of legal fighting over the environmental and economic damage done by the energy giant’s oil spill in 2010.

Keystone pipeline divides Congress as deadline nears

- The Washington Times

With a decision looming, both sides of the Keystone XL pipeline debate are making last-ditch appeals to President Obama, with opponents saying the project fails the White House’s climate test and supporters arguing it’s a no-brainer that will spur U.S. energy independence and economic growth.

The White House this week once again is zeroing in on climate change, a top priority for President Obama during his final 18 months in office. (Associated Press)

Obama climate change agenda faces legal, political resistance

- The Washington Times

With Barack Obama’s legacy on health care seemingly secure after last week’s landmark Supreme Court decision, the president’s ambitious environmental agenda will come into sharper focus — but a host of legal challenges and growing defiance across the country threaten his efforts to fight climate change.

This Dec. 13, 2010, file photo shows CMS Energy Corp.'s B.C. Cobb Plant in Muskegon, Mich. (Jeffrey Ball, The Muskegon Chronicle via AP) ** FILE **

Supreme Court strikes down Obama power-plant regulations

- The Washington Times

President Obama’s climate change agenda hit a roadblock at the Supreme Court on Monday, but the administration brushed aside the decision and declared victory anyway, saying most utilities already have made the pollution cuts that technically are no longer necessary in light of the high court’s ruling.

Related Articles

Oil can be seen in the Gulf of Mexico, more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, as a large plume of smoke rises from fires on BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig in this April 2010 file photo. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Plan OK'd to drill into BP's ill-fated Macondo reservoir

- Associated Press

Deep-water drilling is set to resume near the site of the catastrophic BP PLC well blowout that killed 11 workers and caused the nation's largest offshore oil spill five years ago off the coast of Louisiana.

The most egregious examples of government waste, fraud or abuse from TWT staff. (Golden Hammer cropped logo)

Congress keeps funding overbudget plutonium site with no real customers

- The Washington Times

This week the House approved over $300 million for a Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility at Savannah River in South Carolina as part of U.S. nuclear nonproliferation efforts, despite calls from watchdog groups to gut a program that has fallen far behind schedule, exceeded its budget and has no real customers.

In this photo taken on April 16, 2015, a group of kayakers rafted together work to pull up a protest sign as they practice for an upcoming demonstration against Arctic oil drilling, in Elliott Bay in view of downtown Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

In Seattle, 'kayaktivists' take on Arctic oil drilling

- Associated Press

Royal Dutch Shell wants to park two massive Arctic oil drilling rigs in Seattle's waterfront - but the petroleum giant will have to get around protesters in kayaks and a mayor determined to take on climate change.

Nearly $1 billion in loans have already defaulted under the Energy Department program, which included the infamous Solyndra stimulus project and dozens of other green technology programs the Obama administration has approved, totaling nearly about $30 billion in taxpayer backing, the Government Accountability Office reported in its audit. (Associated Press)

Obama clean energy loans leave taxpayers in $2.2 billion hole

- The Washington Times

Taxpayers are on the hook for more than $2.2 billion in expected costs from the federal government's energy loan guarantee programs, according to a new audit Monday that suggests the controversial projects may not pay for themselves, as officials had promised.