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With melting glaciers and rising seas as his backdrop, President Obama will visit Alaska this week to press for action to combat climate change in a state whose economy and jobs depend heavily on the oil business. (Associated Press)

Alaskans concerned Obama visit a ploy to highlight green legacy

- The Washington Times

President Obama on Monday will begin a three-day trip to Alaska to hike on a glacier and call attention to climate change, amid concern from Alaskans and the oil and gas industry that the president merely wants to use the resource-rich state as backdrop to burnish his legacy as an environmentalist.

Saudi-U.S. ties will be under scrutiny again when 79-year-old King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud makes an expected visit to Washington next month, his first since ascending to the throne. (Associated Press)

Saudi royals’ grasp on power threatened by sharp drop in oil prices

- The Washington Times

The sharp drop in oil prices is starting to bite for the world’s longtime top oil-producing nation, Saudi Arabia, and could threaten the seemingly unshakable social contract that has seen the kingdom’s royal family rule for nearly a century with almost no opposition or oversight from the nation’s masses.

President Obama said he wanted inspections "anywhere, anytime" of Iran's nuclear facilities to ensure Tehran is adhering to terms of the deal. But the actual agreement? Iran gets 24 days' notice of inspections of suspicious sites. A secret side deal allows Tehran's own inspectors to check a military site where work on nuclear weapons was thought to have been carried out. (Associated Press)

Iran nuke deal erases Obama’s red lines

- The Washington Times

From allowing Iran to keep enriching uranium to abandoning “anywhere, anytime” inspections of Tehran’s nuclear facilities, the Obama administration has crossed many of its own red lines in the nuclear deal that will lift tough economic sanctions on America’s longtime adversary.

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