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People fill the street during the People's Climate March, Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014, in New York. Tens of thousands of activists walked through Manhattan on Sunday, warning that climate change is destroying the Earth — in stride with demonstrators around the world who urged policymakers to take quick action. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

400K rally for climate change in New York City streets

- The Washington Times

More than 400,000 reportedly showed up for a rally in New York City aimed at showing the world that the United States not only cares about climate change, but will take the lead on proposals to curb carbon — a “People’s Climate March” that comes just days before an important U.N. climate conference.

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Sterling farmer seeks to open organic store

- Associated Press

Musty warmth carries the sour odor of fresh manure inside Sackett Family Farms Organic Produce second greenhouse. The sharp smell is distracting.

Decision on bison quarantine expected mid-2015

- Associated Press

A decision is expected in mid-2015 on a proposal to capture and quarantine wild bison from Yellowstone National Park so disease-free animals can be relocated to create new herds, Yellowstone's chief scientist said.

Maine event celebrates electric cars

Associated Press

Environmental advocates will give residents a chance to drive electric cars at Maine Drive Electric Day in South Portland.

People fill 58th Street between 8th and 9th Avenue  in New York before a climate change protest march Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014. Thousands of people from across the nation are expected in New York City to participate in what's billed as the largest march ever on global warming. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Global marches draw attention to climate change

- Associated Press

Tens of thousands of activists walked through Manhattan on Sunday, warning that climate change is destroying the Earth - in stride with demonstrators around the world who urged policymakers to take quick action.

Senate bill averts Miles City BLM office closure

Associated Press

A Bureau of Land Management satellite office in Miles City that otherwise was slated to close next year will remain open under legislation approved by the U.S. Senate.

Oil spill research grant program gearing up

Associated Press

The National Academy of Sciences expects to start taking applications this fall for the $500 million assigned to the 30-year research program set up as a result of criminal settlements from the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Lots of nuts and berries in Smokies good for bears

Associated Press

Wildlife experts expect fewer nuisance bears in East Tennessee this fall because a good crop of nuts and berries in the Smokies should prevent them from ranging in search of food.

Cost of shutting down Wolf Creek could top $1B

Associated Press

Shutting down the Wolf Creek nuclear power plant could cost as much $1 billion when it reaches the end of its useful life about 30 years from now, according to a new report.

State officials asks Ford to examine dump site

Associated Press

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is asking Ford Motor Co. to examine a dump site at its former St. Paul plant this month to make sure it is free of troublesome contamination.

State-BLM relations in Utah called 'untenable'

Associated Press

Sheriffs and the lieutenant governor in Utah are airing complaints about the management style of the top federal Bureau of Land Management law enforcement agent.

EPA, state marks cleanup phase at Superfund site

- Associated Press

A federally backed cleanup of thousands of lead-contaminated properties that lie in or near the Tar Creek Superfund site in northeastern Oklahoma is finally finished, but environmental agencies predicted it could take decades longer before the geography within the 40 square-mile area of former mining towns is completely remediated.

Minnesota news in brief at 7:58 p.m. CDT

Associated Press

An early frost came at a bad time for Minnesota farmers, who were hoping to continue to grow their crops into October after heavy spring rains delayed planting or killed crops in the region.