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(AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)

D.C. Council votes to allow concealed handguns

- Associated Press

A reluctant District of Columbia Council voted unanimously Tuesday to allow people to carry concealed handguns in the nation’s capital for the first time in nearly 40 years.

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Don Amos and his wife Beth of Leesburg, Va. eat dinner with his gun at The Cajun Experience during Second Amendment Wednesdays where patrons are allowed to open carry their guns, Leesburg, Va., Wednesday, August 20, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Lawmakers grudgingly draft bill to authorize concealed carry of guns in D.C.

- The Washington Times

People who have a "good reason" to feel threatened — for example, stalking victims — would be able to seek a concealed carry permit for a legally owned handgun under a new D.C. law proposed Thursday. But those with generalized fears, such as apprehension about living in a neighborhood with high crime, would not be considered eligible for such a permit, officials say.

This April 8, 2014 photo shows a general view of the Maryland State House in Annapolis.  The results of nearly $8 million in renovations, and a window back to the 18th century, will be on view with the reopening of the Old Senate Chamber, the old Senate Committee Room and the stairwell room. The changes will include touch-screen interactive guides, a bronze sculpture of Washington and a portrait gallery. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Md. reaching out for health care re-enrollment

- Associated Press

State officials plan to contact tens of thousands of Maryland residents who need to re-enroll in health insurance plans under the federal health care law as the state transitions to a revamped system, replacing its flawed website for the next open enrollment period that starts in November.

This handout image provided by the Montgomery County, Md., Police Department shows the original missing person/suspicious circumstances bulletin for the 1975 disappearance of two young sisters in Maryland, Sheila Lyon and Katherine Lyon, who never returned home from a shopping mall. Police in Maryland say a convicted sex offender currently imprisoned in Delaware has emerged as a person of interest in the disappearance of the two young sisters.  (AP Photo/Montgomery County, Md., Police Department)

Search for Maryland sisters missing since 1975 resumes

- Associated Press

Investigators from two states were searching an area near Lynchburg, Virginia, for the remains of two young sisters from Maryland who were abducted in 1975, police said late Tuesday.

A man in California was murdered less than an hour after he was mistakenly set free by a jury. (** FILE ** Associated Press)

Alexandria schools on alert after weapon report

Associated Press

Alexandria school officials say all schools went on lock-in after a report of a person brandishing a weapon near one school, but students are now on their way home.

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe waves a letter from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services during a news conference at the Patrick Henry Building in Richmond, Va.,  Monday, March 24, 2014.  McAuliffe is proposing a two-year pilot of an expanded Medicaid program, a suggestion he hopes will persuade Republicans to end an impasse over the state's budget. McAuliffe announced that the federal government said it would not penalize Virginia if it ran a two-year pilot program.  House Republicans oppose Medicaid expansion. The federal government has promised to fund the bulk of the expansion. (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Bob Brown).

Governor, lawmakers announce Virginia budget cuts

- Associated Press

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe and Republican lawmakers are planning to fill a $882 million budget shortfall by tapping the state government's rainy day fund and making cuts to various agencies, universities, and local governments. The plan won't affect K-12 school spending and will not include any increase in fees or taxes, they said.

Sen. Thomas R. Carper, Delaware Democrat (Associated Press)

D.C. statehood hearing seeks 'thoughtful solution' to lack of voting rights

- The Washington Times

A Democratic senator held the first congressional hearing on D.C. statehood in 20 years to "restart the conversation" about the city's lack of voting representation on Capitol Hill, but the discussion barely got off the ground before a top Republican quickly dismissed the summit as a one-sided look at a measure that's going nowhere.

A bill is before Congress to once again take up the issue of statehood for the District of Columbia. (Nancy Pastor/The Washington Times) **FILE**

D.C. resumes push for statehood

- The Washington Times

The District's top elected officials will join legal scholars on Capitol Hill Monday for the first congressional hearing on D.C. statehood in 20 years.