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Baltimore's murder clearance rate currently stands at 53.7 percent, according to Baltimore Deputy Police Commissioner Kevin Davis, even lower than the national average. (Associated Press)

Cops nationwide struggle to solve murders, as case clearance rate drops to 64 percent

- The Washington Times

The national homicide “clearance rate” — that is, local police identifying and arresting killers — has slipped to 64.1 percent from more than 90 percent just 50 years ago amid shrinking budgets, higher closure standards and more crimes being committed by gangs and drug dealers who may have no local footprint and/or encourage a “no-snitch” mentality.

Sen. David Vitter, Louisiana Republican, says he'll try to force the Senate to vote on a bill halting the subsidy that lawmakers and their staffs get to pay for insurance on the Obamacare exchanges, saying that's a benefit no other American receives, so Congress shouldn't either. (Associated Press)

GOP senator wants to subpoena D.C. health care exchange

- The Washington Times

Republican Sen. David Vitter will ask his Senate committee next week to authorize a subpoena against the D.C. health exchange, turning up the heat in his lengthy quest to find out who allowed Congress to use the city’s small-business Obamacare portal.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser wants footage from the Metropolitan Police Department's expanding body camera program to be exempt from public records requests, making the District one of an increasing number of jurisdictions trying to limit access in order to balance the technology with privacy concerns. (Associated Press)

D.C. wants to keep police body camera footage hidden from public eye

- The Washington Times

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser wants footage from the Metropolitan Police Department’s expanding body camera program to be exempt from public records requests, making the District one of an increasing number of jurisdictions trying to limit access in order to balance the technology with privacy concerns.

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In this Friday, March 20, 2015 photo, a maple amber beer is poured at Chatham Brewing in Chatham, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

DC Beer Festival kicks off Saturday at Nationals Park

- The Washington Times

It's springtime, and the gates of Nationals Stadium in Southwest have officially been thrown open for the season. And just as the Nats begin their April quest for October glory, dozens of craft breweries and food vendors will be taking over the baseball diamond this weekend for the DC Beer Festival Saturday.

In a speech this week, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen insisted his agency has turned the corner on problems with employee behavior in recent years. (Associated Press)

Ex-IRS ethics office lawyer disbarred for ... ethics violations

- The Washington Times

A lawyer who worked in the IRS ethics office was disbarred Thursday by the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, which concluded she misappropriated a client's funds from a case she handled in private practice, broke a number of ethics rules and showed "reckless disregard for the truth" in misleading a disbarment panel looking into the matter.

Ryan Reynolds and Helen Mirren star in "Woman in Gold," a film that tells the story of a woman and a family portrait.

'Woman in Gold' director explains connection to niece's quest for famous portrait

- The Washington Times

Most people know it as the "painting on the fridge magnets," but few know the long, tormented history of Gustav Klimt's "Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I," painted by the Austrian master in 1907. The work passed to model Bloch-Bauer's Viennese descendents, from whom the Nazis stole it, along with thousands of other priceless works owned by the Austrian capital's Jews.

A police officer directs a vehicle to turn away at the National Security Agency, Monday, March 30, 2015, in Fort Meade, Md. Earlier, a firefight erupted when two men dressed as women tried to ram a car into a gate, killing one of them and wounding the other, officials said. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

FBI identifies man killed in NSA shooting

- Associated Press

Two cross-dressing men who were fired upon by National Security Agency police when they disobeyed orders at a heavily guarded gate had just stolen a car from a man who had picked them up to "party" at a motel, police said Tuesday.

Religious liberty: 5 things you should know

- The Washington Times

The Indiana law, which was fashioned on the federal version, is being called anti-gay and discriminatory against gays, and it has drawn heckles from the likes of NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley, ESPN mouth-man Keith Olbermann and former "Star Trek" actor George Takei. The mayor of Seattle wants to prohibit city workers from traveling to Indiana. In light of that and more, here are five things about religion and gay rights that you need to know: