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Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier said that even before decriminalization took effect, police did not actively pursue many marijuana possession charges. "Officers for the last 20 years have avoided possession of marijuana arrests because they've not been prosecuted for many, many years," Chief Lanier said. (Associated Press)

Up in smoke: Most D.C. marijuana citations go unpaid

- The Washington Times

D.C. police have written more than 250 tickets for marijuana possession in the roughly six months since the District relaxed its marijuana laws, but the vast majority of citations have simply been ignored, an analysis by The Washington Times has found.

Brad Whitehead of Manchester, England fires a fully automatic machine gun at Machine Guns Vegas Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, in Las Vegas. Most visitors to Machine Guns Vegas have already pulled the trigger on an Uzi or an M5, from the behind the controls of their XBox. But with strict gun laws keeping the real thing out of reach for most people, especially outside the U.S., indoor shooting ranges with high-powered weapons have become a hot tourist attraction. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Virginia Senate panel shoots down gun control bills

- The Washington Times

A Virginia Senate panel on Monday killed several gun control initiatives pushed by Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe, including bills to require universal background checks on gun show sales and reinstatement of the state’s recently-lifted ban on purchasing more than one handgun per month.

Richard G. Sterne, Jr.

D.C. fire chief demoted in beer case to be reinstated

- The Washington Times

An arbitrator has ordered the D.C. fire department to reverse former Chief Kenneth B. Ellerbe’s demotion of a 33-year veteran employee over his handling of an internal disciplinary matter involving beer found in a fire house.

Bros. Landreth

Catch a rising star in alt-country as Bros. Landreth band releases debut album

Yes, we know we’re harping on this band of brothers — and we’ll give it a rest after this — but we don’t want you to miss out on musicians who capture the attention of critics at Billboard, CMT and beyond, thus proving they were no Americana Music Association flash in the pan. Consider this your last call to see a band on the path to hitting it big.

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Officer Benjamin Fetting models a wolfcom radio that has a camera built into it as Washington, D.C. MPD Chief Cathy Lanier announces that the police department is testing five different kinds of body-worn cameras during a pilot program, during a press conference at the Wilson Building, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times) ** FILE **

Pro-police rally, 'Sea of Blue' march, set for D.C. on Saturday

- The Washington Times

A pro-police rally is planned in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to show support for law enforcement at a time when departments nationwide have come under scrutiny for officer-involved shootings and a handful of police killings have left officers feeling increasingly under siege.

The NTSB is investigating the incident of a subway train that spilled smoke near the L'Enfant Metro Station in Washington. One woman was killed and dozens others were sent to the hospital. District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser has promised a full report on the incident with 48 hours. (Associated Press)

Muriel Bowser promises full report on D.C. Metro incident

- The Washington Times

It took firefighters at least 30 minutes after the first 911 call to reach Metro train commuters stuck in smoke-filled cars, with first responders to the deadly incident sent to three different locations, according to preliminary information released Thursday by D.C. officials.

The NTSB is investigating the incident of a subway train that spilled smoke near the L'Enfant Metro Station in Washington. One woman was killed and dozens others were sent to the hospital. District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser has promised a full report on the incident with 48 hours. (Associated Press)

Confusion reigned in response to Metro smoke

- The Washington Times

It took firefighters at least 30 minutes after the first 911 call to reach Metro train commuters stuck in smoke-filled cars, with first responders to the deadly incident sent to three different locations, according to preliminary information released Thursday by D.C. officials.

Lucas Hall

5 actors portray 40 in Ludwig's 'Baskerville'

Young Washington lawyer Ken Ludwig cast aside his comfortable position with the Steptoe & Johnson LLP law firm for the flimsiest of reasons: He yearned to become a playwright. Sensible souls clucked their tongues. What a farce!

General William Donovan works in the OSS headquarters offices during World War II. (OSS Society)

Saved from the wrecking ball? New plans emerge for OSS HQ, historic home to the nation's top spies

- The Washington Times

Three cheers, and perhaps a 21-gun salute for a rare cultural victory in the age of hasty conclusions and insta-buildings. The General Services Administration is now mulling over practical ways to preserve one of the most unique clutch of buildings in the nation's capital, all previously faced with a most undignified tear down. The august former headquarters of the Office of Strategic Services - that's the precursor of the CIA - were at risk of facing the bulldozer, potentially to fall in favor of new office space for the Department of State, which stands close by, as does the Lincoln Memorial, Kennedy Center and multiple historic sites.

A firefighter attends people on a bus to assess triage needs after people were evacuated from a smoke filled Metro subway tunnel in Washington, Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. Metro officials say one of the busiest stations in downtown Washington has been evacuated because of smoke.  Authorities say the source of the smoke is unknown.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

D.C. officials defend first responders after deadly Metro incident

- The Washington Times

District leaders on Tuesday said they remain confident in the agencies that respond to emergencies and terrorist incidents on Metro, despite the mixed reaction from trapped riders on how long it took first responders to reach a stopped, smoke-filled train Monday in which one woman died and scores were hospitalized.