Skip to content

Local

Featured Articles

Super Bowl and sex go together

- The Washington Times

Take down this phone number or punch it into your cellphone: 1-888-373-7888. It’s a round-the-clock, toll-free hotline to the nonprofit group Polaris. It’s Super Bowl time in Phoenix, which means be on the lookout for human traffickers, pedophiles, johns and prostitution.

(AP Photo/Martha Irvine)

Virginia Senate OKs bills on exercise, discipline in school

- The Washington Times

The Virginia state Senate easily passed bills Tuesday that would require students in kindergarten through fifth grade to exercise an average of at least 20 minutes per day and direct the state Board of Education to develop regulations on the use of isolation and restraint of children in public schools.

Related Articles

Officers cover their badges with a black stripe for Blue Mass at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, May 7, 2013. The Blue Mass is held to pray for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remember those who have fallen, and support those who serve at the beginning of National Police Week.  (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Washington, D.C., by the numbers

- The Washington Times

About 300 U.S. mayors are expected to gather in the nation's capital on Wednesday to give a synopsis of their take on President Obama's State of the Union address. The timing is perfect.

Children participate in the annual White House Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 9, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Porta-potty horror at White House

- The Washington Times

It ended in tears for Monica Ellis, who shattered her foot in a fall outside the portable toilets at the 2012 White House Easter Egg Roll — and now she's suing for $4 million.

D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson said the council should be in the clear to hold public meetings on the proposed legislation which would codify regulations regarding marijuana that were not included in a voter-approved ballot initiative. (Associated Press)

D.C. Council sets up hearings on marijuana regulation

- The Washington Times

The D.C. Council is pursuing a regulatory scheme for the sale and taxation of marijuana, scheduling hearings on proposed legislation that flies in the face of congressional attempts to prevent the District from loosening its drug laws.

Officer Benjamin Fetting models a wolfcom radio that has a camera built into it as Washington, D.C. MPD Chief Cathy Lanier announces that the police department is testing five different kinds of body-worn cameras during a pilot program, during a press conference at the Wilson Building, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times) ** FILE **

Pro-police rally, 'Sea of Blue' march, set for D.C. on Saturday

- The Washington Times

A pro-police rally is planned in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to show support for law enforcement at a time when departments nationwide have come under scrutiny for officer-involved shootings and a handful of police killings have left officers feeling increasingly under siege.

The NTSB is investigating the incident of a subway train that spilled smoke near the L'Enfant Metro Station in Washington. One woman was killed and dozens others were sent to the hospital. District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser has promised a full report on the incident with 48 hours. (Associated Press)

Muriel Bowser promises full report on D.C. Metro incident

- The Washington Times

It took firefighters at least 30 minutes after the first 911 call to reach Metro train commuters stuck in smoke-filled cars, with first responders to the deadly incident sent to three different locations, according to preliminary information released Thursday by D.C. officials.

The NTSB is investigating the incident of a subway train that spilled smoke near the L'Enfant Metro Station in Washington. One woman was killed and dozens others were sent to the hospital. District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser has promised a full report on the incident with 48 hours. (Associated Press)

Confusion reigned in response to Metro smoke

- The Washington Times

It took firefighters at least 30 minutes after the first 911 call to reach Metro train commuters stuck in smoke-filled cars, with first responders to the deadly incident sent to three different locations, according to preliminary information released Thursday by D.C. officials.