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"My father's approach to the most brutal and unambiguous social injustices during the civil rights struggle was rooted in nonviolence as a morally and tactically correct response," Martin Luther King III said in an interview with The Washington Times. "In no way do I, nor would my father, condone any 'ends justify the means' behavior." (Associated Press)

Martin Luther King III sees Ferguson riots, violence against police as setbacks

- The Washington Times

NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: On the holiday commemorating his father’s epic civil rights legacy, Martin Luther King III says he is dismayed by recent violence against police, the destructive protests in Ferguson and the trashing of a U.Va. fraternity falsely accused of sexual assault because they don’t reflect his father’s own approach to advocate for change peacefully.

Greek Cypriots cast a suspicious eye on the Cypriot gas pipeline project, as the EU selected a plan that went out of its way to exclude Turkish participation. (associated press)

Cypriot union threatened by dispute over oil and gas rights

- The Washington Times

NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: A top official from the Turkish north of Cyprus says the Greek Cypriot government has jeopardized a delicate peace process between the two long-divided sides by pursuing “hegemony” over oil and gas exploration operations in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

Breitling Energy CEO Chris Faulkner downplays the dangers of fracking brought forth by environmentalists. (Lloyd Villas/The Washington Times)

U.S. oil surplus eases prices in global crises

- The Washington Times

NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: Increased U.S. production is helping to create an oil surplus on world markets, driving down prices despite a myriad of threats to oil supplies, and doing more to crush Russia’s economy than the sanctions imposed by the U.S. and European Union, said Chris Faulkner, chief executive of Breitling Energy.

Tanzania President Jakaya Kikwete talks with The Washington Times at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Northwest.  (Khalid Naji-Allah/Special to The Washington Times)

Tanzanian president seeks greater U.S. involvement in Africa

- The Washington Times

NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: As more than 40 African leaders converge on Washington for a three-day summit that begins Monday, President Jakaya Kikwete of Tanzania is among those seeking a deeper commitment from the Obama administration and U.S. corporations to spend more on his country.

Related Articles

Obama’s re-election seen as vote for clean energy

- The Washington Times

A majority of Americans didn't just cast a vote for President Obama on Nov. 6. They also came down firmly on the side of renewable energy and the federal government's efforts to "level the playing field" with fossil fuels, argues the chairman of the solar power industry's leading trade group.

Republicans urged to call Democrats’ bluff

- The Washington Times

Grover Norquist says Republicans will emerge victorious from the "fiscal cliff" fight if they put television cameras in the negotiating room and smoke out Democrats over their reluctance to cut entitlement programs — the biggest drivers of federal spending and the national debt.

D.C. on its way to health care compliance

- The Washington Times

President Obama's re-election on Tuesday smoothed the way for states to implement his signature health-care reforms, a challenge the District took on with vigor while other states waited to see if Republican opponent Mitt Romney could deliver on a promise to unravel the controversial law.

Rep. Jim Jordan, Ohio Republican (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

Confident conservative Jordan: Stand ground on taxes

- The Washington Times

Other Republicans may be worried about the campaign prospects of Mitt Romney but not Rep. Jim Jordan, chairman of the conservative caucus in the House, who said voters have made the decision to reject President Obama and replace him with the GOP nominee.

** FILE ** Gov. Bob McDonnell of Virginia meets with editors and reporters of The Washington Times on Friday, July 27, 2012. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

Va. Gov. McDonnell sees Paul platform influence

- The Washington Times

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell said the rise of the tea party and Rep. Ron Paul's supporters within the Republican Party will push the GOP platform this year to focus more on matters such as the deficit and constitutional liberties.

Moroccan Ambassador to the U.S. Mohammed Rachad Bouhlal talks to editors and reporters at The Washington Times on Wednesday. (J.M. Eddins Jr./The Washington Times)

European woes spark challenges for Moroccans

- The Washington Times

Morocco may have avoided the upheaval of an Arab Spring revolution, but it faces other challenges due to its economic closeness to crisis-riddled Europe and heavy reliance on remittances.

Zoltan Kovacs, Hungary's state secretary for government communication, said his country's government has become a "whipping boy" of the Western media. As a result, "we've found that whatever we do is being criticized." Judicial, media, banking and religious laws pushed through by the Fidsz Party's parliamentary supermajority have raised concern. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)

Hungarian leaders see hysteria among critics of reforms

- The Washington Times

The United States and the European Union have fallen victim to a "kind of hysteria" in their reactions to the new constitution enacted this year by Hungary's ruling nationalist, a leading spokesman for the Central European nation says.

Marion C. Blakey, president & CEO of Aerospace Industries Association, is interviewed at The Washington Times in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, May 17, 2012. ( J.M. Eddins Jr./The Washington Times)

Defense contractors eye cuts to jobs, plants

- The Washington Times

Defense contractors already are preparing for the layoffs and plant closures that will occur if Congress fails to reach a deal on the federal deficit this year, triggering $600 billion in automatic Pentagon spending cuts.

Enrique Pena Nieto (Keith Dannemiller/Special to The Washington Times)

Charismatic front-runner in Mexican presidential race vows shift on drugs, trade

- The Washington Times

The front-runner in Mexico's presidential race has attracted throngs of supporters among elite and ordinary citizens alike with his calls to boost his country's trade relationships with Canada and the U.S. — a refocusing effort his staffers call "NAFTA 2.0" — and to tamp down the drug violence that has muddied Mexico's reputation.

Newt Gingrich, with wife Callista, speaks at the airport of Lake in the Hills, Ill., Thursday. The former House speaker sounds less hawkish on foreign-policy matters. "Instability rather than aggression is the great threat," he recently said of North Korea. (Associated Press)

Gingrich edges away from hawkish past on campaign trail

- The Washington Times

Once considered a leading voice of the foreign interventionist wing of the Republican Party, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich on the presidential campaign trail this year has been edging away from his trademark "Make my day" aggressiveness toward those hostile to the United States.

NFIB leader not impressed by GOP hopefuls

- The Washington Times

He's been sharply critical of President Obama and his economic agenda, but Dan Danner, president of the National Federation of Independent Business, said he has not been overly impressed so far by what the opposition is offering for small businesses.