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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 1, 2015, before debate continues in the Senate on renewing the Patriot Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

NSA phone snooping doomed as Obama signs USA Freedom Act

- The Washington Times

The National Security Agency’s phone-snooping program is on its last legs after senators approved the USA Freedom Act Tuesday, rewriting the sweeping Patriot Act to ban bulk collection of Americans’ data and adding more transparency checks to the secret court that oversees intelligence gathering in the hopes of heading off future surprises.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks in Nashville, Tenn., in this May 30, 2015, file photo. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig, File)

Jeb Bush on GOP primary: ‘This isn’t tiddlywinks we’re playing’

- The Washington Times

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush extended somewhat of an olive branch on Tuesday to the 2016 GOP field, saying any of the Republicans running for president would be better than former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton or President Obama, while also predicting there will be some “elbows and knees under the boards” in the intra-party nominating contest to come.

House Select Committee on Benghazi Chairman Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

House GOP moves to punish State Dept. over Benghazi delays

- Associated Press

Following through on a threat, House Republicans on Tuesday proposed cutting the State Department’s budget to protest its slow response in producing documents related to the investigation of the terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya.

Happy fans cheer while Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks in Burlington, Vermont. (associated press)

The Bernie Sanders Effect: Fawning media coverage normalizes socialism

- The Washington Times

There’s yet another trend in the trendy news media, identified by more than one concerned critic. Consider a new Investor’s Business Daily editorial titled “The soft-soaping of socialism in the U.S.” The publication focuses on the happy-go-lucky press coverage of a certain Vermont independent making a vigorous run for the White House as a Democrat.

Related Articles

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks to the media during a news conference following a Senate policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 2, 2015, as legislation to end the National Security Agency's collection of Americans' calling records while preserving other surveillance authorities is expected to clear the Senate late Tuesday. But House leaders have warned their Senate counterparts not to proceed with planned changes to a House version. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

McConnell's role in surveillance bill bewilders his friends

- Associated Press

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, generally seen as a master congressional deal-maker, walked into a legislative dead end on domestic surveillance that left some of his friends bewildered.

NC House panel to debate updated gun bill

Associated Press

House Republicans have decided to move forward with an updated bill on gun regulations that ultimately still would repeal North Carolina's pistol permit application system run by local sheriffs.

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. departs in an elevator after speaking at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 2, 2015, calling for the 28 classified pages of the 9-11 report to be declassified. Paul has been voicing his dissent in the Senate against a House bill backed by the president that would end the National Security Agency's collection of American calling records while preserving other surveillance authorities. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Questions and answers about newly approved USA Freedom Act

- Associated Press

President Barack Obama has signed into law the USA Freedom Act, which extends three expiring surveillance provisions of the 9/11-era USA Patriot Act. It also overhauls the most controversial provision, which had been interpreted to allow bulk collection of U.S. phone records by the National Security Agency.

California lawmakers tackle smoking age, immigrant health

- Associated Press

California lawmakers on Tuesday tackled a wide range of bills to raise the smoking age, extend health care to immigrants and make it easier to register to vote as the Legislature advanced dozens of proposals ahead of a Friday deadline to pass bills out of their house of origin.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., right, accompanied by, from left, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo. and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., speaks to the media during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 2, 2015, following a Senate policy luncheon as legislation to end the National Security Agency's collection of Americans' calling records while preserving other surveillance authorities is expected to clear the Senate late Tuesday. But House leaders have warned their Senate counterparts not to proceed with planned changes to a House version. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Congress sends NSA phone-records bill to president

- Associated Press

Congress approved sweeping changes Tuesday to surveillance laws enacted after the Sept. 11 attacks, eliminating the National Security Agency's disputed bulk phone-records collection program and replacing it with a more restrictive measure to keep the records in phone companies' hands.

California considers health coverage for immigrant kids

- Associated Press

The California Senate on Tuesday approved legislation that would make the state the first in the nation to extend health coverage to children who are in the country illegally and seek federal authorization to sell private insurance to immigrants without documentation.

New NC gun bill still would end sheriff pistol permit system

Associated Press

A reworked gun bill in the North Carolina House would eliminate the state's longstanding pistol permit application system in six years rather than three and place new limits upon sheriffs who issue or deny those permits in the interim.

Briefs from the Louisiana Legislature's regular session

Associated Press

A resolution calling for a states' convention that could alter the U.S. Constitution was shot down by a Senate committee Tuesday amid fear it would create a "nightmare" that could dramatically change the country's primary legal document.