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Sen. Bob Casey, Pennsylvania Democrat. (Associated Press)

U.S. not fully prepared for nuclear terrorist attack

- Associated Press

The federal government isn’t fully prepared to handle a nuclear terrorist attack or large-scale natural catastrophe, lacking effective coordination, and in some cases is years away from ensuring adequate emergency shelter and medical treatment, congressional investigators have found.

Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures during his annual news conference in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014. The Russian economy will rebound and the ruble will stabilize, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday at his annual press conference, he also said Ukraine must remain one political entity, voicing hope that the crisis could be solved through peace talks. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

Vladimir Putin: West is trying to ‘defang’ the Russian bear

- Associated Press

President Vladimir Putin vowed Thursday to fix Russia’s economic woes within two years by diversifying away from its heavy reliance on oil and gas and voiced confidence that the plummeting ruble will soon recover.

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Cars enter and depart from Sony Pictures Entertainment studio lot in Culver City, Calif., Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014. Companies across the globe are on high alert to tighten up network security to avoid being the next company brought to its knees by hackers like those that executed the dramatic cyberattack against Sony Pictures Entertainment. The hack, which a U.S. official has said investigators believe is linked to North Korea, culminated in the cancellation of a Sony film, "The Interview," and ultimately could cost the movie studio hundreds of millions of dollars.  (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Companies' data security in question after Sony hack

- Associated Press

Companies across the globe are on high alert to tighten up network security to avoid being the next company brought to its knees by hackers like those that executed the dramatic cyberattack against Sony Pictures Entertainment.

In this photo taken Monday, Dec. 15, 2014, migrants gather around the fire which they use for cooking and warmth in the abandoned brick factory in the northern Serbian town of Subotica, near the border between Serbia and Hungary. Coming from as far away as Afghanistan and Syria and as near as Kosovo and Albania, thousands of irregular migrants a week are crossing into Hungary and requesting asylum, turning the country into a new hot spot in a transit route into the EU. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

Hungary is new hot spot on migrant route into EU

- Associated Press

With the Mediterranean Sea becoming too treacherous and other routes blocked by barbed-wire fences, would-be migrants are taking a new route into the Europe Union: through Hungary.

Britain moves closer to allowing women in combat

Associated Press

Britain's defense minister said Friday that women should be allowed to serve in front-line army combat units, and he hopes the first will be joining within two years.

New ties with Cuba won't change immigration rules

- Associated Press

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson says the Obama administration's decision to renew diplomatic ties with Cuba won't impact immigration rules just yet.

A poster for the movie "The Interview" is taken down by a worker after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014, in Atlanta. Georgia-based Carmike Cinemas has decided to cancel its planned showings of "The Interview" in the wake of threats against theatergoers by the Sony hackers. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Digital dilemma: How will US respond to Sony hack?

- Associated Press

The detective work blaming North Korea for the Sony hacker break-in appears so far to be largely circumstantial, The Associated Press has learned. The dramatic conclusion of a Korean role is based on subtle clues in the hacking tools left behind and the involvement of at least one computer in Bolivia previously traced to other attacks blamed on the North Koreans.

Russian sailors leaving France without warship

- Associated Press

Hundreds of Russian sailors pulled out of a French port Thursday, bearing perfumes for their loved ones but lacking the controversial bounty they came for: a 1-billion-euro, French-built warship that has become a hostage to the biggest East-West conflict since the Cold War.

FILE -In this Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014 file photo, soldiers accused of refusing to fight in the country's northeastern Islamic uprising appear before a court martial in Abuja, Nigeria.  On Wednesday Dec. 17, 2014, the court-martial sentenced 54 soldiers to death for mutiny, assault, cowardice and refusing to fight Islamic extremists, connected to the soldiers' refusal to deploy to recapture three towns seized by Nigeria's home-grown Boko Haram in August, according to the charge sheet. The lawyer for the condemned men, Femi Falana, said the 54 soldiers were convicted and sentenced to death by firing squad. He said five soldiers were acquitted.(AP Photo/Olamikan Gbemiga FILE)

Lawyer defends acts of Nigeria soldiers sentenced to death

- Associated Press

A human rights lawyer says 54 soldiers have been sentenced to death because they embarrassed Nigeria's military by demanding weapons to fight Islamic extremists, and says they were justified in not going on what would have been a suicidal mission.

People attend a community prayer vigil at the Emmanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church in Souderton, Pa. for the shooting victims of Bradley W. Stone, in Montgomery County, Pa., Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2014. An Iraq War veteran suspected of killing his ex-wife and five of her relatives was found dead of self-inflicted stab wounds Tuesday in the woods of suburban Philadelphia, ending a day-and-a-half manhunt that closed schools and left people on edge. (AP Photo/The Philadelphia Daily News, Steven M. Falk) THE EVENING BULLETIN, TV OUT, MAGS OUT, NO SALES

Correction: Home Shootings-Pennsylvania story

- Associated Press

In a story Dec. 17 about a former Marine believed to have killed six people, The Associated Press misidentified the agency that deemed him free of any suicidal or homicidal thoughts. It was Veterans Affairs, not the Veterans Administration.