Skip to content

Security

Featured Articles

Former CIA Deputy Director Michael Morell testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 2, 2014, before the House Intelligence Committee. Morell, who edited the widely debunked talking points on the 2012 Benghazi attack, answered questions from the House intelligence committee in a rare open session. The hearing provides Morell with a chance to explain why he deleted references to al-Qaida.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

CIA detected no ‘credible threat’ before Benghazi attacks

- The Washington Times

The CIA’s main reason for setting up shop in Benghazi was to uncover the plans of al Qaeda-linked extremists, yet its officers there detected no sign that terrorists were set to launch the deadly Sept. 11, 2012, attacks on the U.S. diplomatic mission and the agency’s own compound, a new House Intelligence Committee report shows.

Joe Abbey, Arxan Technologies' director of software engineering, displays on his computer how he hacked into a phone app during a demonstration at the Black Hat USA 2014 cyber security conference Aug. 6 in Las Vegas. Federal systems grow more susceptible to attack as the government's online offerings expand to user-friendly websites and apps, experts say. (Associated Press)

Cybersecurity lapses leave government agencies vulnerable to hackers

- The Washington Times

Even though there have been at least two dozen mass breaches of government computer systems since 2013, many federal agencies continue to have a lax culture and poor security provisions to repel the growing threat from hackers and cyberattacking states such as Russia, Iran and China, internal investigative reports show.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Secretary of State John F. Kerry held a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the closed-door nuclear talks with Iran in Vienna on Sunday. (Associated Press)

U.S., Iran may extend nuclear talks

- The Washington Times

U.S. and Iranian officials appeared close on Sunday to extending the high-stakes talks over Iran’s disputed nuclear program after failing to meet a self-imposed deadline for a deal that would open the program to close international scrutiny in exchange for a withdrawal of crippling Western sanctions on Tehran.

U.S. military guards walk within Camp Delta military-run prison, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba, June 27, 2006. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

U.S. releases Saudi prisoner from Guantanamo Bay

Associated Press

A Saudi citizen who has spent the past 12 years detained at Guantanamo Bay has been released, the Pentagon said Saturday, amid a push to whittle down the prison population at the U.S. base in Cuba.

This image provided by the U.S. Navy shows Navy Vice Adm. Tim Giardina in a Nov. 11, 2011, photo. Giardina, fired last year as No. 2 commander of U.S. nuclear forces may have made his own counterfeit $500 poker chips with paint and stickers to feed a gambling habit that eventually saw him banned from an entire network of casinos, according to a criminal investigative report obtained by The Associated Press.   (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)

Fired nuke commander linked to fake poker chips

- Associated Press

The admiral fired last year as No. 2 commander of U.S. nuclear forces may have made his own counterfeit $500 poker chips with paint and stickers to feed a gambling habit that eventually saw him banned from an entire network of casinos, according to a criminal investigative report obtained by The Associated Press.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014, file photo, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel listens to a question during a briefing at the Pentagon. A senior administration official says Secretary of State Chuck Hagel is resigning from President Barack Obama's Cabinet.   (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

AP Sources: Hagel resigning as Defense secretary

- Associated Press

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is stepping down under pressure from President Barack Obama's Cabinet, senior administration officials said Monday, following a rocky tenure in which he has struggled to break through the White House's insular foreign policy team.

Britain's Home Secretary Teresa May speaks during the counter-terrorism awareness week conference at the Royal United Services Institute in  London  Monday Nov. 24, 2014.  British authorities are outlining a new set of counterterrorism measures, including a ban on insurance companies reimbursing ransom payments. The bill to be outlined Monday by Home Secretary Theresa May reinforces Britain's long-held position that there should be no ransom payments to terrorists because payments to groups such as Islamic State merely place more people at risk. (AP Photo/John Stillwell/PA) UNITED KINGDOM OUT

UK: 'Severe' terror threat requires new powers

- Associated Press

Britain's interior minister said Monday that the country faces its greatest-ever threat from terrorism, as she announced measures to control suspects, strengthen online scrutiny and prevent insurance companies from paying terrorist ransoms.

FILE - In this Nov. 6, 2010 file photo, United Technologies Chairman & CEO Louis Chenevert listens as President Barack Obama holds a roundtable discussion with CEO's and business leaders in Mumbai, India. Aerospace and building systems giant United Technologies announced Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, the abrupt retirement of Chenevert, and named Chief Financial Officer Greg Hayes to succeed him. Chenevert, 56, is also stepping down as chairman. He had been appointed to both jobs in 2008.(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

United Technologies CEO retires, succeeded by CFO

- Associated Press

Aerospace and building systems giant United Technologies announced Monday the abrupt retirement of CEO Louis Chenevert, and named Chief Financial Officer Greg Hayes to succeed him.

Thai editor sentenced to jail for defaming king

- Associated Press

A military court in junta-ruled Thailand sentenced a Web editor to 4 1/2 years in jail Monday for publishing an article five years ago that it said defamed the nation's king.

DOD spending down, Corps finds other work

- Associated Press

Military construction activity continues to decline across Alaska, but work with other federal agencies should keep government contractors busy.

Vermont firms' government business growing

Associated Press

New state figures show Vermont companies got 519 government contracts worth $103 million in the fiscal year that ended June 30, up nearly 300 percent from 2012.