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Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures during his annual news conference in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014. The Russian economy will rebound and the ruble will stabilize, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday at his annual press conference, he also said Ukraine must remain one political entity, voicing hope that the crisis could be solved through peace talks. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

Vladimir Putin: West is trying to ‘defang’ the Russian bear

- Associated Press

President Vladimir Putin vowed Thursday to fix Russia’s economic woes within two years by diversifying away from its heavy reliance on oil and gas and voiced confidence that the plummeting ruble will soon recover.

In this Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014, file photo, a banner for "The Interview" is posted outside Arclight Cinemas in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

A look at North Korea’s cyberwar capabilities

- Associated Press

Most North Koreans have never seen the Internet. But the country Washington suspects is behind a devastating hack on Sony Pictures Entertainment has managed to orchestrate a string of crippling cyber infiltrations of South Korean computer systems in recent years, officials in Seoul believe, despite North Korea protesting innocence.

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More US troops going to Iraq in a couple of weeks

- Associated Press

The next wave of American troops will begin moving into Iraq in a couple of weeks to train local forces, the top U.S. commander for the mission said Thursday while cautioning that it will take at least three years to build the capabilities of the Iraqi military.

This photo provided by Columbia Pictures - Sony shows, Randall Park, center, as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Columbia Pictures' "The Interview." North Korea has been linked to the unprecedented act of cyberwarfare against Sony Pictures that exposed tens of thousands of sensitive documents and escalated to threats of terrorist attacks that ultimately drove the studio to cancel all release plans for "The Interview." (AP Photo/Columbia Pictures - Sony, Ed Araquel)

Timeline of the Sony Pictures Entertainment hack

- Associated Press

It's been four weeks since hackers calling themselves Guardians of Peace began their cyberterrorism campaign against Sony Pictures Entertainment. In that time thousands of executive emails and other documents have been posted online, employees and their families were threatened, and unreleased films were stolen and made available for illegal download. The hackers then escalated this week to threatening 9/11-like attacks against movie theaters scheduled to show the Sony film "The Interview." That fanned security fears nationwide and resulted in the four top U.S. theater chains pulling the film from their screens, ultimately driving Sony to cancel the film's release.

Russian sailors leaving France without warship

- Associated Press

Hundreds of Russian sailors pulled out of a French port Thursday, bearing perfumes for their loved ones but lacking the controversial bounty they came for: a 1-billion-euro, French-built warship that has become a hostage to the biggest East-West conflict since the Cold War.

India's space program notches 2 more successes

Associated Press

India on Thursday announced two more successes in its space program - launching the country's largest rocket and testing the re-entry of an unmanned crew module, part of India's quest to send humans into space.

New ties with Cuba won't change immigration rules

- Associated Press

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson says the Obama administration's decision to renew diplomatic ties with Cuba won't impact immigration rules just yet.

People attend a community prayer vigil at the Emmanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church in Souderton, Pa. for the shooting victims of Bradley W. Stone, in Montgomery County, Pa., Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2014. An Iraq War veteran suspected of killing his ex-wife and five of her relatives was found dead of self-inflicted stab wounds Tuesday in the woods of suburban Philadelphia, ending a day-and-a-half manhunt that closed schools and left people on edge. (AP Photo/The Philadelphia Daily News, Steven M. Falk) THE EVENING BULLETIN, TV OUT, MAGS OUT, NO SALES

Correction: Home Shootings-Pennsylvania story

- Associated Press

In a story Dec. 17 about a former Marine believed to have killed six people, The Associated Press misidentified the agency that deemed him free of any suicidal or homicidal thoughts. It was Veterans Affairs, not the Veterans Administration.

A poster for the movie "The Interview" is taken down by a worker after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014, in Atlanta. Georgia-based Carmike Cinemas has decided to cancel its planned showings of "The Interview" in the wake of threats against theatergoers by the Sony hackers. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Digital dilemma: How will US respond to Sony hack?

- Associated Press

The detective work blaming North Korea for the Sony hacker break-in appears so far to be largely circumstantial, The Associated Press has learned. The dramatic conclusion of a Korean role is based on subtle clues in the hacking tools left behind and the involvement of at least one computer in Bolivia previously traced to other attacks blamed on the North Koreans.

FILE -In this Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014 file photo, soldiers accused of refusing to fight in the country's northeastern Islamic uprising appear before a court martial in Abuja, Nigeria.  On Wednesday Dec. 17, 2014, the court-martial sentenced 54 soldiers to death for mutiny, assault, cowardice and refusing to fight Islamic extremists, connected to the soldiers' refusal to deploy to recapture three towns seized by Nigeria's home-grown Boko Haram in August, according to the charge sheet. The lawyer for the condemned men, Femi Falana, said the 54 soldiers were convicted and sentenced to death by firing squad. He said five soldiers were acquitted.(AP Photo/Olamikan Gbemiga FILE)

Lawyer defends acts of Nigeria soldiers sentenced to death

- Associated Press

A human rights lawyer says 54 soldiers have been sentenced to death because they embarrassed Nigeria's military by demanding weapons to fight Islamic extremists, and says they were justified in not going on what would have been a suicidal mission.