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Pro-democracy student protesters occupy a main thoroughfare in Hong Kong after Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying refused to meet with demonstrators before their deadline. Tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets in the stiffest challenge to Beijing's authority since China took control of the former British colony in 1997. (Associated Press)

Honk Kong leader Leung refuses to meet with pro-democracy protesters

- The Washington Times

Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying refused to meet Tuesday with pro-democracy protesters calling for his resignation, as tens of thousands of demonstrators blocked city streets and braced for an anticipated crackdown by Beijing’s communist regime as early as Wednesday — China’s National Day.

President Obama meets with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Washington, D.C., to discuss bilateral trade relations and the possibility of reviving nuclear energy talks, however, India's liability laws may scuttle such plans. Mr. Modi maintained he is open to changing those laws. (Associated Press)

Nuclear liability laws strain U.S.-India energy policy

- The Washington Times

President Obama and his Indian counterpart pledged Tuesday to cooperate on nuclear energy, but specialists say Indian liability laws have made progress virtually impossible and have rendered moot a landmark 2008 agreement between the two countries.

Obama goal of Gitmo closure stalled at Pentagon

- Associated Press

The transfer of prisoners out of Guantanamo Bay has ground to a halt amid a slow Pentagon approval process, causing deep frustration within the administration and raising doubts that President Barack Obama will be able to fulfill his campaign promise to close the offshore prison for terrorism suspects.

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Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel, speaks during the 69th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Benjamin Netanyahu: Hamas, Islamic State group share creed

- Associated Press

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu compared his country's recent bombing campaign in Gaza to the U.S.-led strikes against militants in Iraq and Syria, saying Hamas and the Islamic State group share the same goal of world domination.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai, second left, swears in chief executive Abdullah Abdullah, left, and his two deputies, during his inauguration ceremony at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. Ghani replaced Hamid Karzai in the country's first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion toppled the Taliban. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

New Afghan president sworn in after disputed vote

- Associated Press

Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai was sworn in Monday as Afghanistan's new president, replacing Hamid Karzai in the country's first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion toppled the Taliban.

Turkish Kurds watch clashes between Syrian Kurdish fighters and militants of the Islamic State close to Turkey-Syria border near Suruc, Turkey, Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014. (AP Photo)

U.S.-led airstrikes hit 4 Syrian provinces

- Associated Press

U.S.-led coalition warplanes bombed Islamic State group positions overnight across four provinces in northern and eastern Syria, hitting a grain silo as well as the country's largest gas plant, activists said Monday.

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi is making his first visit to Washington, D.C., this week. He had a private dinner with President Obama Monday night, though the White House wouldn't say whether intellectual property reform was on the agenda. (Associated Press)

Modi pressed to address intellectual property reforms

- The Washington Times

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has declared that his nation is "open for business," but some U.S. industry leaders remain troubled by India's policy toward intellectual property rights and question whether the new leader, making his first visit to Washington this week, will follow through on his promise to address the problem.

In this Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014 photo, radical al-Qaida-linked preacher Abu Qatada, first left, receives a friend, on the day he was released from Jordanian prison after an acquittal on security charges, in Amman, Jordan. Abu Qatada and Abu Mohammed al-Maqdisi, two of Jordan's top pro-al-Qaida ideologues held court on the rooftop of a villa whispering to each other and rising occasionally from plastic chairs to greet supporters. The two have denounced some of the Islamic State group's practices as un-Islamic - comments some analysts say have turned the preachers into assets in Jordan's campaign to contain the Islamic State, which is believed to have attracted thousands of followers in Jordan. (AP photo/Mohammad Hannon)

Battle against Islamic State creates new alliances

- Associated Press

On a recent evening, two of Jordan's top pro-al-Qaida ideologues held court on the rooftop of a villa decorated with strings of lights. Sporting shaggy beards and robes, the Muslim preachers whispered to each other and rose occasionally from plastic chairs to greet supporters.

FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2014 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. By President Barack Obama’s own admission, the U.S. bombing campaign against militants in Syria could help President Bashar Assad cling to power. Critics say Obama’s strategy does little to address the conditions that have allowed the Islamic State group to thrive and could leave Syria a hotbed for extremism.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

U.S. intel disputes Obama claim on Islamic State

- The Washington Times

U.S. policy leaders, including President Obama, were repeatedly warned for more than a year by the U.S. intelligence community that the Islamic State terror group was gaining significant strength in Syria and was on the verge of seizing territory deep inside Iraq, where the military was struggling to respond.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai, left, is sworn in by Chief Justice Abdul Salam Azimi, during his inauguration ceremony at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, Sept. 29, 2014. Ghani Ahmadzai He replaces Hamid Karzai in the country's first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion toppled the Taliban. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Afghan president sworn in, paving way for U.S. pact

- Associated Press

Afghanistan swore in Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai as its second elected president on Monday, embarking on a new era with a national unity government poised to confront a resilient Taliban insurgency by signing an agreement with the United States that would guarantee a continuing American military presence.

Indian leader Modi heads for White House visit

- Associated Press

When Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi meets President Barack Obama for the first time at the White House, the welcome will be very different from the response Modi got nearly a decade ago when he wanted to visit the U.S. His visa request was denied.

Ex-FBI agent pleads guilty in Afghan scheme

- Associated Press

A former FBI agent pleaded guilty Monday to charges that he derailed an investigation into military contract fraud by making a suspect appear to be a key counterintelligence source.

North Carolina Republican Senate candidate Thom Tillis answers a question from the media during a news conference in Greensboro, N.C., Friday, Sept. 26, 2014. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Tillis draws foreign policy focus in NC Senate ad

- Associated Press

U.S. Senate candidate Thom Tillis began running a statewide TV ad on Monday designed to shift emphasis in his race against incumbent Kay Hagan to foreign policy by accusing her of being inattentive to the threat posed by Islamic State militants.

Judge holds Argentina in contempt over bond orders

- Associated Press

A judge, calling civil contempt a rarity, ruled that Argentina was in contempt of court on Monday for its open defiance of his orders requiring that U.S. hedge funds holding Argentine bonds be paid the roughly $1.5 billion they are owed if the majority of the South American nation's bondholders are paid interest on their bonds.