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Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times

The famous bimbo eruptions are back (as if they had ever really gone away), and for once Bubba appears to be in the clear. No new accusations of rude behavior have been lodged against him.

Illustration on a poll-driven view of America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Misleading polls and fake news

Newscasts continue to be filled with references to polling numbers that suggest President Trump and his policies are deeply unpopular, and that the American people overwhelmingly oppose the actions taken by America’s 45th president during his first 100 days in office.

The Non-biodegradable Plastic Bottle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How an overreaching FTC attacks the environment

The proliferation of plastic on land and in our oceans — plastic that can take hundreds of years to biodegrade — is among the most serious environmental issues in the world. As a consumer, wouldn’t you want to know about a plastic bottle that biodegraded in significantly less time?

Illustration on Trump's first 100 days by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

The president’s ongoing challenges

The Trump administration is still in the throes of getting its foreign policy act together, expressing conflicting messages on Russia, Syria and other troubles abroad as it nears the 100th day of his presidency.

Theresa May (The Washington Times illustration)

With unexpected crackle and snap, Theresa May becomes Theresa Will

Prime Minister Theresa May is giving herself a new identity. Suddenly she’s no longer “Theresa Maybe,” showing her mettle by moving toward Margaret Thatcher’s politics of the bold and unexpected. She still has a way to go to transform that mettle into the steel of the Iron Lady, but she may be on her way.

North Korean school girls react upon seeing their photograph being taken as they walk along Mirae Scientists Street on Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Tensions have spiked in recent weeks over North Korea's advancing nuclear technology and missile arsenal. But in Pyongyang, where war would mean untold horrors, few people seem to care much at all. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

What next with North Korea?

There was a moment at Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s White House briefing Monday that was significant. Asked by a reporter about North Korea’s missile launch last weekend, Mr. Spicer said the administration was aware of the launch and that “it failed.” End of story. Next question, please.

A woman collecting money for charity stands next to a quote written on an information board at Tower Hill underground train station, written in defiance of the previous day's attack in London, Thursday, in this March 23, 2017, file photo. On Wednesday, a man went on a deadly rampage, first driving a car into pedestrians then stabbing a police officer to death before being fatally shot by police within Parliament's grounds in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Charity keeps America free

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump’s senior advisers, deep in the weeds of tax reform, are reportedly looking at ways to save the middle class by placing more financial responsibilities on the shoulders of the wealthy — and part of the plan being discussed is to limit the level of deductions charitable organizations can take. This is the wrong way to go.

Emergence of Redneck Porn Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redneck porn

The 20th century gave us a good many new literary genres. Modernism, Futurism, Dadaism. Later on there was Post-modernism, Structuralism, Deconstruction. And now there’s a new literary genre: Redneck Porn.

Illustration on progressivism and government by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Apocalyptic liberalism

Shortly after the 2008 election, President Obama’s soon-to-be chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, infamously declared, “You never let a serious crisis go to waste.”

Illustration on the March for Science by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Goose stepping for science

Imagine yourself in Moscow in 1950, taking part in a March for Science. Science in the Soviet Union had been suffering for many years under Trofim Lysenko, a third-rate biologist who promoted unsound agricultural policies.

Illustration on the Syrian conundrum by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

A sober look at the confusion in Assad’s Syria

Was “Tomahawking” Syria for an alleged gas attack justifiable retribution, misfeasance, malfeasance or just a mistake? Was it a warning to China and North Korea as some have advanced? (This is the same line of thinking that bombing Hiroshima and Nagasaki was really aimed cautioning the Soviet Union.) Why would China, the “celestial kingdom,” powerful in her own right, pay attention; why would North Korea, in the hands of a madman, even care?

Fox News host Tucker Carlson interviews Drexel University professor George Ciccariello on March 30, 2017. (Fox News screenshot)

The rot of political correctness

In today’s academy, truth is an invention. Expecting people to show up on time is racist. Censorship is good. Silencing opposing viewpoints imperative. Violence to enforce safety is natural.

Illustration on Erdogan's impact on Turkey by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The end of Turkey’s democratic experiment

On the grounds of the Turkish Embassy facing Massachusetts Ave. in Washington, D.C. is a statue of Mustafa Kamal Ataturk, father of the Republic of Turkey, the nation-state he built from the rubble of the defeated Ottoman Empire and Islamic caliphate.

Illustration on the proposed Eisenhower Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saving the Eisenhower Memorial

There is hope. I am speaking of the envisioned memorial to Dwight D. Eisenhower here in Washington, D.C. Admittedly, its design by the crank architect Frank Gehry has been pretty much accepted by the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission, and the chairman of the House committee that has control of the funding, Rep. Ken Calvert, seems to be going along.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2017 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks during a  news conference in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. Former President Barack Obama will speak Monday, April 24, 2017, in Chicago with young community leaders and organizers in an event at the University of Chicago, where his presidential library is planned. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Obama heads to Chicago to agitate against Trump

- The Washington Times

Steel yourselves. Barack Obama's about to emerge from the shadows -- and first stop, University of Chicago. Make no mistake about it. This is about teaching the upcoming generation, loud as it already is about all topics that offend, to get even louder, even Leftist Prouder, and to -- here's the gist -- use that Leftist Loud and Proud persona to tackle the problem of President Donald Trump.

President Donald Trump speaks on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, April 19, 2017, during a ceremony where he honored the Super Bowl Champion New England Patriots for their Super Bowl LI victory. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The New York Times admits wrongdoing? Why, yes -- yes indeed

- The Washington Times

Did The New York Times just admit wrongdoing? Why yes, yes indeed, the newspaper, through its sports editor, sent an email to The Washington Post taking responsibility for a recent tweet that appeared to show how much the New England Patriots hated President Donald Trump in comparison to Barack Obama -- only the tweet was highly inaccurate.

Scientists go all woman-ey and gear for anti-Trump protests

- The Washington Times

Scientists -- and granted, that term is used most loosely in this context -- have taken a page from the leftist woman's playbook on How to Defeat Donald Trump in Six Easy Protest Steps and, upset at the president's climate change views, scheduled some mean marches for the streets of Washington, D.C.

Far-right leader and candidate for the presidential election Marine Le Pen speaks in Paris, Friday, April 21, 2017, one day after the attack that killed one police officer and wounded three other people. Le Pen campaigns against immigration and Islamic fundamentalism. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

Paris terror shows Marine Le Pen, like Trump, is right

- The Washington Times

A terror attack in Paris -- now there's a phrase we've been seeing quite a bit of in recent times -- could be the final straw for France citizens, the one that drives Marine Le Pen across the finish line. Why? She's right. France needs quick border control and a halt to immigration.

A spy in the right place at the right moment

Alexsi is a creation of and for the world of Joseph Stalin at its most terrifying. A practiced thief at 16 years old, he is captured by the communist NKVD, the law enforcement agency of the Soviet Union, and becomes a secret agent who is also a trained killer.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan wears cufflinks depicting the Maryland state flag as he signs a bill during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, April 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Confusion in the marketplace

The Maryland legislature has just sent a bill to Gov. Larry Hogan that will, if he signs it, sow confusion in the state's generic drug marketplace and subject consumers to considerable harm. It's bad economics laced with a large dose of politics that begs him to pull out his veto pen and limber up his writing hand.

Dr. Jumana Nagarwala (henryford.com)

Genital mutilation takes a hit

A Michigan physician was charged this week with the ritual mutilation of the genitals of two sisters, one 6 and the other 7 years old, revealing a sordid -- and illegal -- practice in certain Muslim communities that has put up to 500,000 young American girls at risk of this barbaric mutilation.

GOP good at splitting own vote

The crowded field in Georgia's 6th Congressional District election (11 Republicans vs. one Democrat) poses the question of whether Georgians are aware of the perils of splitting the vote within their own party. They came very close to snatching defeat out of the jaws of victory. Either they are very young voters or they have forgotten history.

U.S. airlines must up service game

I read with great interest "Trump signs executive order for 'buy-American, hire-American' policy" (Web, April 18). Last week I flew on American Airlines from Philipsburg in St. Maarten to Charlotte, North Carolina. To the passengers' surprise, there was no in-flight media entertainment on the flight, which lasted four hours and 16 minutes.

Eat real food, not carbs

Ever hear the one about the medical professional who proclaimed that 80 percent of what medical doctors do is not backed by double-blind, randomized, controlled trials? Unfortunately, it's no joke. For the uninitiated, these trials are the best way to demonstrate cause and effect. The implication: Medical quackery is alive and well in your doctor's office. Medical mistakes are the third leading cause of death.

Mike Huckabee hates Comcast, too

- The Washington Times

Apparently, having a "former presidential candidate" or "former governor" next to your name doesn't get you any better Comcast cable service than the average no-name Joe. Just ask Mike Huckabee.