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Seal of the Just Us Department Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A post-Holder Justice Department worthy of the name

Watergate-era misconduct and politicization at the Department of Justice shattered public trust in a once-venerated institution by 1975. The urgent task of restoring Justice fell to Edward H. Levi.

Senate candidate Bruce Braley, right,  campaigns with  U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in an Iowa Votes rally in Des Moines  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at the Hotel Fort Des Moines . (AP Photo/The Des Moines Register, Rodney White)  MAGS OUT, TV OUT, NO SALES, MANDATORY CREDIT

It was a dark and stormy Democratic night

- The Washington Times

This is the week the political world, like the worm, begins to turn. The polls, the hunches, the guesses and the vibes that only junkies feel all say it’s a Republican year and Harry Reid will soon take a seat on the back bench.

Shortly before mailing his own ballot, U.S. Senator Mark Udall, D-Colo., speaks inside a coffee shop on a campaign stop to remind voters to mail in their ballots, in the Five Points area of Denver, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Showing proper ID is a fact of life

If you’ve ever tried to board a plane, cash a check or rent a car, you’ve almost surely had to show some form of identification with your picture on it. Millions of Americans produce them every day to do dozens of everyday tasks and think nothing of it.

Rising Sea Levels Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another EPA alarm about rising seas that aren’t rising

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy visited Miami Beach recently to raise awareness about the need to “stop global warming” in order to save the region from dangerous sea-level rise.

In this Sept. 30, 2014, file photo, Gordon Kamara, left, is sprayed by Konah Deno after they loaded six patients suspected to have been infected by the Ebola virus into their ambulance in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia. *AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)

It’s the Ebola incompetence, stupid

There are a few things in the world that we know for sure, including the existence of Ebola, what those infected go through, and the fact that, as of now, there is no cure or official universal treatment that mitigate its fatality rate said to be around 70 percent.

Related Articles

Twitter (Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire via AP Images)

Liberals more likely than conservatives to dump a friend over politics: Study

- The Washington Times

Politics brings out certain petty behaviors in people, particularly those who frequent Facebook and Twitter. To like, or not to like, to friend — or horrors — unfriend? A retweet can be a personal matter, indeed. Politics and ideology play a pronounced role in the phenomenon, this according to an extensive survey and analysis of "political divisiveness" among Americans released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. The study found that liberals are more likely to dump a friend than conservatives over partisan leanings alone.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Invisible Bridge'

Liberals will like Rick Perlstein's "The Invisible Bridge" for it will affirm their sense of moral superiority and the certainty that their motives are always pure. It will also reinforce their view that conservatives are ill-motivated haters and yahoos.

In this Oct. 1, 2014 photo, placards advocating a position to keep casino gambling in Massachusetts rest against a wall in the entrance to the Plainridge Racecourse harness racing track in Plainville, Mass. The Plainridge Park Casino is under construction adjacent to the harness racing track in Plainville. Voters will decide in the Nov. 4 election whether to repeal a 2011 law that opened the door for casinos in the state. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Pew Research poll finds motivated conservatives twice as likely as liberals to vote on Nov. 4

- The Washington Times

Conservatives are twice as likely as their liberal counterparts to go to the polls Nov. 4. No really. "Although overall turnout among the public is likely to be around 40 percent, 73 percent of those who hold consistently conservative attitudes are likely to vote in the midterm, as are 52 percent of those with mostly conservative views," reports the Americans Trends Panel, a substantial new gauge of the upcoming midterm election by the indefatigable Pew Research Center.