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Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Illustration on the relationship between Hillary Clinton and Goldman Sachs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pinned to Wall Street

When Goldman Sachs, the powerful, multibillion-dollar Wall Street investment bank, offered Hillary Clinton $675,000 for three speeches, she readily accepted.

Spiro Agnew Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Spiro Agnew shaped Republican rhetoric

Spiro Agnew today is what he characterized himself as in 1968. Richard Nixon tapped the unknown governor of Maryland to be his Republican vice presidential running mate: “not exactly a household word.”

Duplicitous attacks on the Maldives

It is a compelling tale. A longtime political activist leads his party to victory in a closely fought election in a country famed for its pristine archipelagos and on the front of the war against climate change. There is no doubt that Mohamed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, was adept at using the international media to promote his agenda while in government.

A student teacher in the second-grade classroom of teacher Susanne Diaz at Marcus Whitman Elementary School, goes over lessons with students, in Richland, Wash. (Ty Beaver/The Tri-City Herald via AP)

Let no child be left unconfused

- The Washington Times

Mae West, the famous philosopher of the boudoir, would hardly believe her fortune today. “So many men,” she once complained, “so little time.” She was the kind of girl who set out to “climb the ladder of success, wrong by wrong.”

Illustrations on Christians and Yazidis in Syria and Iraq by Lians Garsys/The Washington Times

Forsaken for their faith

It’s now a couple of weeks of news cycles since we learned from satellite imagery that the Islamic State had destroyed the monastery of St. Elijah, which for more than 11 centuries served as a spiritual oasis for the promulgation of Christianity in the Middle East.

Cost of Ethanol on the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Renewable Fuel Standard deceit

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants Americans to pay more for their groceries. That’s the only way to explain the agency’s decision to mandate the use of corn-based ethanol in our gas supply.

Changing Campaign Financing Rules Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An alternative to nonstop political fundraising

America’s campaign finance laws are often a convenient scapegoat for all of our country’s ills. Witness Democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders invoking campaign spending in response to seemingly every other debate question.

Illustration on bad teachers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Teachers who can’t teach

Anew study in the New England Journal of Medicine has a surprising conclusion. It finds that over the past decade, 1 percent of physicians accounted for 32 percent of malpractice claims. In other words, health care providers could eliminate one-third of malpractice and its associated health, legal and economic costs by removing the worst 1 percent of doctors.

GOP Talent Pool Fading Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The disappearing governors

The Iowa caucuses may have only muddied the waters in the presidential race, but they almost definitively decided one thing: the next president will not be a governor. That’s an amazing revelation because just one year ago all the smart money was betting that the next president would be a Republican governor.

Illustration on U.S. development of reusable rockets by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A dangerous partnership with Russia

It is with a terrible sense of deja vu that I find myself again warning American lawmakers about our reliance on Russian rocket engines to loft military satellites. For more than a decade, America’s workhorse rocket, the United Launch Alliance’s (ULA) Atlas V, has been powered with RD-180 engines imported from Russia.

Comparing Abortion to the Holocaust Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How abortion dehumanizes everyone

Over 50 years ago, Adolf Eichmann, the architect of Nazi Germany’s machinery of death, was executed by hanging after his 1961 conviction by an Israeli court.

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Democrats scraping bottom of barrel

"There's a special place in hell for women who don't help each other." So declares Madeleine Albright, former U.S. secretary of state, diplomatic sage and dispenser of political wisdom, in her recent endorsement of Hillary Rodham Clinton's presidential candidacy.

A child jihadi armed with a rocket-propelled grenade has threatened to execute President Obama in a chilling new video released by the Islamic State terrorist group. (Screen grab of Islamic State video via The Daily Mail)

No game for children

Innocence, once lost, vanishes forever. Spoiling a child's only opportunity to laugh and play without the cares of adulthood is a crime. Many children are swept into the violence their parents unleashed across the world, and the fortunate ones cheat death only to endure wasted childhood years and a joyless life.

Importance of music understated

Throughout history music has played an important role in human development. It is \a primary element in nearly all of hummanity's diverse cultures. Scientists are discovering that in addition to the positive effects on human health, music enhances intelligence. Research shows that music is to the brain what physical exercise is to the human body.

Illustration on the policy messages of Democrats and Republican by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fast growth, not slow or negative

Well, well, the stock market has, of a sudden, caught up with the Obama economy. The spectacle is not pretty. In January the market dropped like a stone. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 8.1 percent. On Friday the Nasdaq shed 3.25 percent points upon hearing the news that payroll additions grew by only 151,000 jobs.

The candidates and the Court

The Republican presidential candidates have mostly ignored one of the most important issues the man (or woman) elected in November will face in his or her first term — filling vacancies on the U.S. Supreme Court. Hillary Clinton, however, has no reluctance to say that she will apply a litmus test in selecting nominees, and suggests that Barack Obama would be a good addition to the High Court.

Obama's extremist-mosque misstep

I am befuddled by and totally outraged at the dense rhetoric in President Obama's thinking -- and in the thinking of the millions who believe a man with no experience and no known credentials for his current job.

U.S. has social, ethical problems

If Donald Trump were to become president he would most likely make this country rich financially. Still, ancient Rome fell, wealthy but lacking morals; wrong was just as good as right in the public square.

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks at a town hall-style campaign event, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

A nation of dog-whistlers

Modern America is an ethnic minefield, and everyone must mind his step. It's getting more dangerous as the presidential campaign moves toward crucial primaries in the bigger states. The unwary among us can step on one of those mines and blow holes in the peaceable land, and all unaware.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Boys in the Trees: A memoir'

It would be easy to dismiss singer-songwriter Carly Simon as just another narcissist diva. Indeed, at times reading this spirited memoir where her narcissism is on display over and over and over again, it is hard not to do so. But this would be a mistake, for there is a great deal more to Ms. Simon; and her memoir showcases all that as well.

President Barack Obama speaks at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. The annual event brings together U.S. and international leaders from different parties and religions for an hour devoted to faith. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama's curious religious concerns

President Obama's selective attitude toward religious persecution is puzzling, even to those who are eager to give him the benefit of every doubt. He's eager to reassure peaceful Muslims in the United States that they are welcome among us. It's right and good for him to do that, though he could have moderated his hectoring tone.