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Illustration on the deficiencies of Common Core by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Measuring school progress without mandating it

The United States Senate began debate Tuesday on a bill to fix the problems with No Child Left Behind, the federal law causing confusion and anxiety in our country’s 100,000 public schools.

Illustration on Iran's development of methanol in response to U.S. sanctions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Iran turns lemons into high-octane lemonade

In 2009, as intelligence reports confirmed that Iran — the world’s leading state-sponsor of terrorism — had resumed its nuclear weapons development program, the efforts of American policy officials to reverse it focused first on Iranian vulnerabilities. What critical commodity or service essential to daily life in Iran might be restricted by sanctions and thereby influence the government of Iran to change course? It didn’t take long to identify such a strategic commodity: gasoline.

Uncle Sam's Interference in the Railroad Business Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Repeating a mistake by reregulating U.S. freight rail

The U.S. freight rail system is facing one of its greatest threats in a generation, as the federal Surface Transportation Board considers far-reaching proposals to reregulate American railroads.

Forget the prime-time interviews or the formal, choreographed news conferences. President Obama is taking to Twitter to muse about sports, pop culture, even Supreme Court rulings at all hours of the day. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)

Imagining an economic silver lining

This is a time to be very skeptical of political analysts who are telling voters that the Democrats “have regained an advantage” over the GOP as we head toward the 2016 presidential election.

Supporters gather for a rally to protest the removal of Confederate flags from the Confederate Memorial Saturday, June 27, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala.   (Julie Bennett/AL.com via AP) MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

The Civil War that never ends

- The Washington Times

Breaking news from 1865: There’s a war on between the North and the South. This time it’s barely more civil than last time, though we aren’t shooting at each other. Yet.

Illustration on providing more support for loved ones caring for wounded veterans by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

A call to share the care

As America continues to strengthen the care we provide to those who have gone to war on behalf of our nation, we must recognize that for too long we have overlooked the most valuable individuals entrusted with the well-being of our wounded, ill and injured veterans. Nearly five-and-a-half million spouses, parents, children and other loved ones have voluntarily put their lives on hold to provide our returning service members with a trusted continuum of care that could not be replicated without them. Many of them will provide this care for years, if not decades to come.

Illustration on providing more support for loved ones caring for wounded veterans by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

A call to share the care

America appreciates, honors and praises veterans who serve our country. But standing out of the ceremonial limelight, and always close by, are the millions of loved ones who care for those veterans. Our service members have returned home with disabling illnesses and injuries that often alter their lives — and the lives of their loved ones — forever. I am one of the 5.5 million military caregivers who witness and endure the long-term consequences of war in a way that many Americans will never experience.

Bankruptcy is the only way Greece can fashion a new beginning

Almost every option facing debt-drenched Greece is bad, but there is only one that will end this Greek tragedy for good. Let Greece go bankrupt. Then let this once-rich nation, hit the restart button to rebuild its economy.

U.S. President Ronald Reagan gestures as Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev looks on after their third session of talks at the Hofdi in Reykjavik, Oct. 12, 1986. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

Obama’s Reykjavik moment

The choice for the president on the Iran nuclear talks is clear: walk away with dignity or appease and submit in disgrace.

Obama’s Clean Power Plan could push millions of minority Americans into poverty

This summer the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will finalize its carbon-dioxide emission regulations under President Obama’s Clean Power Plan. The EPA’s own data projects the regulations will reduce global carbon by less than 1 percent and sea level rise by one one-hundredth of an inch. The price Americans will pay for these “benefits” is layoffs and increased energy rates. Yet for the nation’s most vulnerable, the impacts will be far worse, pushing millions into poverty.

‘Death with dignity’ is often coerced by those with financial interests

Earlier this year, legislation was introduced to the D.C. Council that would legalize physician-assisted suicide in our nation’s capital for an adult patient diagnosed with a terminal condition and less than six months to live. Although this initiative has been introduced in 24 states this year (not passing in any so far), its passage in the District of Columbia this year risks setting a dangerous precedent for the rest of the nation.

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President Barack Obama speaks at the University of Wisconsin at La Crosse, in La Crosse, Wis., Thursday, July 2, 2015, about the economy and to promote a proposed Labor Department rule that would make more workers eligible for overtime. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

No 'whack-a-mole' with ISIS

There was flash and bang aplenty from coast to coast over the Fourth of July, but nothing was fired in anger or with malice. A threatened terrorist attack on the homeland that gave the authorities such concern last week did not happen. The lone wolves stayed at rest in their sordid dens of iniquity. Targets of terror elsewhere, though, were not so fortunate.

Take Iran at its word

This morning I read in a unitedwithisrael.org alert that "Republican presidential hopeful Ted Cruz lamented that under Obama, the U.S. will open an embassy not in Jerusalem, but in the capital of a Communist country whose leader 'hates America.'" This same website also recently reported that an Iranian military commander has said the United States will stay Iran's enemy despite the nuclear deal.

Father Cameron Faller, right, and Julio Escobar, of Restorative Justice Ministry, conduct a vigil for Kathryn Steinle, Monday, July 6, 2015, on Pier 14 in San Francisco.  (AP Photo/Beck Diefenbach)

Death in a sanctuary

Sometimes a single event cuts through the rhetorical fog to illustrate with stunning clarity the consequences of wrongheaded and simpleminded public policy, putting to shame the academics, the pundits, television's talking heads and the politicians who follow their lead in promoting such policy.

Illustration on the losing strategy of U.S. negotiations with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Desperately seeking diplomatic defeat

Imagine if, on Sept. 12, 2001, I had written a column predicting that within less than 15 years, the president of the United States would be offering the world's leading sponsor of terrorism a path to nuclear weapons and tens of billions of dollars. You'd have thought me a lunatic. But that's what President Obama means to do.

Bernie Sanders in 1974

Bernie's flower-child roots

Political observers are still speculating over whether the July 4 New York Times report on the loony biography of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders was meant as a hit job or an encomium. He is closing in on the Democratic frontrunner, Hillary Clinton. Joe Biden is standing in the wings. Other ambitious Democratic pols are smelling blood. Sen. Sanders is surging in New Hampshire, the first primary state.

Nancy Reagan turned 94 on Monday. (Photo courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation)

Cheerful on her birthday: Nancy Reagan at 94

- The Washington Times

Nancy Reagan turned 94 on Monday, complete with a birthday cake trimmed with pink posies, her face aglow with an expectant smile. Social media hummed with well wishes for the former first lady, and observations about her continuing place in history.

Illustration on core beliefs regarding marriage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why evangelicals must return to the core

In the matter of the "culture wars," evangelical Christians are asking, "What do we do now?" The question is being raised in the aftermath of the Supreme Court's decision striking down state laws reserving marriage for heterosexual couples.

The brain-scanning MRI machine that was used at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, for an experiment on tracking brain data is seen on campus Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014.  (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Taxing health and progress

Dreaming up innovative products that make living easier and even save lives requires creating something unimagined out of vision and thin air. That's why President Obama's tax on medical devices has never made sense. It steals the seed corn that talented scientists and engineers need to fund their ideas, and it hobbles efforts to build a healthier and more productive nation. The medical device tax is a drag on progress, and even some "progressives" understand that.

Don't expect much from SCOTUS

Two landmark Supreme Court decisions did more than legalize abortion and same-sex marriage. They also validated a Bible passage in Timothy 1:9-10, which reads, "We know the law is made not for the righteous, but for the lawbreakers and rebels, the ungodly and sinful, the unholy and irreligious, for murderers, and the sexually immoral."

President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, center, speaks at the funeral of the top public prosecutor Hisham Barakat, killed in a terrorist attack, as he was surrounded by Barakat's family members in Cairo, Egypt. (Egyptian Presidency via AP, File)

Adrift in the Middle East

President Obama has a problem with his eyes. He doesn't easily discern the difference between friend and foe in the Middle East. He has redeemed his campaign promise "to put some light" between the United States and Israel, though he confuses "light" with destructive space. Worse, the administration has alternately ignored reality, supported the wrong side, imposed a military assistance embargo, only to lift it, all to damage the Egyptian relationship with the United States.