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FILE - In this March 20, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu huddle during their joint news conference in Jerusalem, Israel. This was never happy-ever-after waiting to happen. When Obama and Netanyahu took office early in 2009, there were plenty of reasons to expect their relationship would be difficult. The cerebral president and the brash prime minister have stark differences in personality, politics and world views. Still, few could have predicted the downward spiral of finger-pointing, backbiting, lecturing and outright name-calling that has occurred. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The occasion the Democrats asked for

- The Washington Times

The Democrats set out to teach John Boehner and Benjamin Netanyahu a lesson. They would boycott the Israeli prime minister’s speech to Congress and apply enough pressure to cancel the speech, keep Mr. Netanyahu at home and embarrass the Republicans who invited him here. What a happy day’s work that would be.

American Defense if Israel Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Standing with Israel in a dangerous world

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Such an invitation is one of the highest honors we can bestow on a foreign leader. And such a speech is normally an occasion of unity in Washington, when elected officials put partisan politics aside and come together to focus on weighty issues of national security.

Failure to Protect Against Iranian Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Iran goes nuclear

Our attention these days with regard to security is understandably riveted on the Islamic State, or ISIS, and its hideous decapitations, rapes and live immolations. We must deal with the Islamic State, but it is not the gravest threat we face. The Israelis are right — we should awaken to the fact that the coming of a nuclear Iran holds special dangers and requires particularly urgent attention. There are four driving reasons.

Obama Veto of Keystone Pipeline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Keystone XL pipeline veto

Experienced vote counters do not believe that either the House or the Senate will muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill. If so, Mr. Obama’s years of delay and disingenuousness on this issue, culminating in his veto, will guarantee negative consequences for America long into the future.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures while addressing the 2015 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Standing with Israel

A world leader giving an address to Congress shouldn’t be controversial, especially when that leader is the prime minister of a major U.S. ally — indeed, a bulwark of freedom in a deeply troubled region of the world.

Attendees vote in the CPAC 2015 Straw Poll at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

CPAC then and now

A conservative reflects on the annual confab.

Illustration on the progressive tax structure by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Do the rich pay their fair share?

Suppose there were a banquet for 100 people and at the end of the night it was time to split the bill of $50 per person. If that bill were paid for the way we pay our income taxes, here is how it would work. Those in the top half of income would pay roughly $97 each and those in the bottom half of the income would pay an average of $3 each. Almost 40 people would pay nothing. And the single richest person in the room would cough up $1,750.

Illustration on the state of American liberty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

CPAC, freedom and saving the country

Attendees of last week’s Conservative Political Action Committee (CPAC), the nation’s largest conference for conservatives, heard a few tried and true conservative messages from potential presidential candidates and activists alike — calls for lower taxes, more freedom for business, a strong national defense, the importance of killing the enemy and the need for a serious foreign policy.

Illustration on continuing political and existential threats to Israel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Much ado about the wrong Israeli controversy

The brouhaha over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s March 3 speech to Congress is diverting attention from more important U.S.-Israel controversies that will escalate soon after this comparatively minor contretemps fizzles out.

Illustration on patent protection by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent ‘reform’ is killing the right to invent

With the best intentions, and naively going along with the corporate world’s hugely financed publicity machine, Congress is about to stomp on America’s most creative citizens, its inventors.

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures while speaking at the 2015 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

The world in peril

Protocol is a valuable tool of diplomacy, but protocol must defer to harsh reality when a nation's survival is at stake. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stepped on protocol and President Obama's toes when he accepted the invitation of Speaker John A. Boehner to speak to the House of Representatives without the customary endorsement of the White House. We say, good for him.

Reject 'crony Christianity'

I have become concerned with what I call crony Christianity. Informed people are probably familiar with the term crony capitalism. Well, crony Christianity is a take on this theme wherein the church, as an institution, tends to cater to small interest groups it does not want to offend, and it does this in a way similar to the way in which crony capitalism caters to special-interest groups that seek special favors from a larger group, whether it be the government or a large corporation.

Rolling the Dice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The world a year from now

The world is a mess, but what will it look like a year from now? No one knows with certainty, but informed guesses can be made, in part, based on the direction of the economies in conflicted areas of the world. Global debt (including that of the United States) is now a higher percentage of global gross domestic product than it was before the Great Recession that began in December 2007, making the world increasingly vulnerable to a new financial crisis.

From the book jacket

The women, widows and bastards passed over

Although the barony held by the 7th Lord Sackville, author of this unusual family history, written under his plain first and last name, dates only from the 19th century, his clan have held grander titles and positions since Tudor times and beyond.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at the winter meeting of the free market Club for Growth winter economic conference at the Breakers Hotel Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015, in Palm Beach, Fla.   (AP Photo/Joe Skipper)

A smear evaporates

Scott Walker had a very good week. He was the star of the beauty contest at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), and the price and proof of his good fortune was the flak he took from the activists and operatives of the left and the magpies of the media. The Wisconsin governor, so the story went, is oblivious of "gender assaults" on campus.

Help own first

Former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani had every right to express his opinion ("To love or not to love America," Web, Feb. 24). President Obama certainly has left an impression that he does not care about American citizens or about our country. He is spending millions of dollars to keep open our borders for illegal immigrants, even hiring extra help to process their documents.

Christian florist is bullying victim

Our economy is built on the great concept of free enterprise. The demand-driven marketplace thrives on competition. It is not the proving ground for perceived social injustices. That would be the territory of a more socialistic, government-controlled economy.