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White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the “a,” the “and,” and the “the.” Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants’ connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

Illustration about the abuse of Sixth Amendment rights in misdemeanor cases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Shining a light on 10 million criminal prosecutions

Adding to the growing momentum in Congress for bipartisan criminal justice reform, last week the Senate Judiciary Committee held a first-of-its-kind hearing to shine much-needed light on pervasive — and largely unexamined — problems in the largest segment of our criminal justice system. Republican Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa heard expert testimony describing widespread violations around the country of the Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel for Americans charged with misdemeanors.

Bringing Children into the World Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Are embryos persons or property?

Much of the media has ridiculed businessman Nick Loeb, the former fiance of actress Sofia Vergara, the star of the sitcom “Modern Family,” because he filed a lawsuit to prevent Ms. Vergara from destroying the frozen embryos they created together in 2013. But many in the pro-life community have rallied behind him, viewing the embryos that were created by Mr. Loeb and Ms. Vergara as persons deserving protection by the state.

**FILE** The sign for the National Labor Relations Board is seen outside the organization's headquarters in downtown Washington on July 17, 2013. (Associated Press)

Labor board overreach

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), stacked with Democratic appointees loyal to Big Labor, enacted new procedures to govern unionization elections.

Reform of the Criminal Justice System Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A ‘safety valve’ for mandatory minimum sentences

In the waning days of Maryland’s legislative session, casual observers were probably surprised to see a freshman, conservative Republican from Western Maryland leading the fight on the Senate floor to reform our state’s harsh mandatory minimum laws. In fact, I was joined by a majority of Republicans in the Senate in voting for this important reform.

Bill de Blasio     Associated Press photo

The false god of politics

Far-left politicians apparently believe that their philosophy is not receiving the worship it is due, despite a track record of failure.

Obama's economic legacy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Omens from Obama’s crumbling economy

President Obama, looking for a legacy, may soon find himself running from one. Americans forgive few things less than a poor economic performance, and Mr. Obama has presided over one throughout his presidency. However, as 2015’s first-quarter results show a stalled economy that threatens to go into reverse, Mr. Obama could finally feel the fallout — not owing to just today’s economy, but his entire presidency’s.

Illustration on Justice Ginsburg's bias in the pending decision on homosexual marriage     The Washington Times

Partial to gay marriage

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not an impartial jurist — not when it comes to the same-sex “marriage” cases, at least. Everyone knows it. Instead of giving confidence to the American public by being above reproach while the same-sex “marriage” cases are being considered, Justice Ginsburg is going out of her way to embarrass the court with unethical antics aimed at assuring pro-same-sex “marriage” supporters and humiliating opponents.

Martin O'Malley speaks with reporters during a roundtable interview at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Jan. 16, 2015. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When Hillary gets an unexpected spanking

- The Washington Times

The Democrats can run, to paraphrase Muhammad Ali’s rebuke of a timid opponent, but they can’t hide. Hillary Clinton is turning her campaign into a game of hide-and-seek, and the party is terrified. Some leading Democrats are beginning to say out loud what they have said privately for weeks.

A puzzling national defense illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Re-establishing a consensus on national defense

From al Qaeda to the Islamic State, we have learned to kill enemy leaders but not much else about basic issues of war and peace. Just last week, the media diverted attention from the scandals of Our Lady of Perpetual Ambition Hillary Rodham Clinton by asking Jeb Bush some really hard questions. Would he have done the Iraq War the same way as his brother — or at all?

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Sunday, May 17, 2015.  Kerry was meeting Sunday with Chinese President Xi before heading to South Korea to complete a short Asian tour that has been clouded so far by concerns over China's construction in South China Sea. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Pool Photo via AP)

A challenge to Chinese targeting of American firms

To supplement profits that have been hamstrung by slowing domestic growth, Western companies are turning to emerging markets with greater frequency. Participation in those markets, however, is not without risk; businesses face challenges ranging from corruption to unfair regulations and a host of other issues.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA $555K -The National Mall with the Lincoln Memorial, and Washington Monument are seen from the roof of the U.S. Capitol Building, on a brisk fall day in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A ‘pivot’ toward Asian Americans

Presidential contenders of both parties are advised to should are advised to take note: The Asian American community is the nation’s fastest-growing demographic group, with China and India superseding Mexico as the countries of origin for recent immigrants, and members of this “model minority” are gradually overtaking their fellow Americans in education and income.

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A salute to homefront heroes

Hats off to The Washington Times for using Military Appreciation Month to shine a light on the war on terror's unsung heroes -- military caregivers. These selfless individuals are the parents and siblings — but more often the spouses -- of soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines recovering from the painful and horrific wounds of war.

What caregivers need: A plea from one hidden hero

There are 5.5 million Americans who have stepped up to become caregivers for wounded warriors, saving our nation $13.6 billion yearly in health care costs. These hidden heroes are simultaneously losing $5.9 billion in their own productivity by putting their careers, education and life as they knew it on hold when their loved one was injured or suffered from a medical illness due to serving in the military.

How America is rallying around the 'hidden heroes' who care for our wounded warriors

It's hard to believe it was just over a year ago that we released an eye-opening report from the RAND Corporation identifying the needs and gaps in support facing the "hidden heroes" of America's wars: the spouses, family members and friends who have dedicated their lives to caring for our wounded, ill and injured warriors. These brave women and men — just like the heroes they are caring for — are making a commitment of service that will stretch for decades. And yet our nation overlooked their critical role for far too long, leaving them to care for our wounded without the support they need or deserve.

The Internet at risk

The Obama administration is determined to give away America's last remaining control of the Internet, an organization called the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, by the end of this year. ICANN assigns the Internet addresses that makes the web work, and the Internet structure is not prepared to receive it.

George Stephanopoulos, chief Washington correspondent for ABC News and anchor of the Sunday-morning political- affairs program "This Week With George Stephanopoulos"

The consequences of betraying trust

Many Americans have moved beyond trusting anyone. They don't trust businessmen and they don't trust businesswomen. They think their bankers are out to cheat them, mistakes at the supermarket are always in the merchant's favor, and the men and women they elect to represent them in Congress turn out to be spineless panderers more interested in their perks of office than in protecting the interests of those who send them to Washington. The democratic government passed down by the nation's Founders has, in the eyes of the frustrated many, morphed into a bloated and incompetent bureaucracy.

Where all the political bodies are buried

Sophisticated cynicism is the coin of the realm for distinguished British journalists like Andrew Marr, who has a reputation as an editor, a BBC political commentator and a historian. This is a dark and shining example of his talent as a satirist.

Nun characterization misleading

Your coverage of the recent canonization of two 19th-century Arab Christian nuns featured some glaring historical distortions that need to be corrected ("Pope Francis canonizes first modern Palestinian saints in heavily symbolic move," Web, May 17).

The late senator Howard Baker's mountainn mansion in Tennessee is going up for auction (Furrow Auction)

Howard Baker's 'mid-century modern' mansion goes up for auction in Tennessee, furniture included

- The Washington Times

Up for auction next month: the Tennessee estate of the late Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr., consisting of a 6,175-square-foot main home, plus cottage, guesthouse, pool and more, all on 11 acres in Huntsville. The home is unmistakably "mid-century modern" in style, with grand river and mountain vistas beyond the huge windows, some streamlined expanses of brick and some sumptuous, old school-style drapes of the era. Baker called this splendid property his "center of the universe," and for good reason.

'And now for something completely different'

For most diehard Monty Python fans, the excitement generated at the idea of John Cleese writing an autobiography must have been enormous. After the announcement of the book's release, the speculation must have included thoughts such as: