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FILE - In this March 18, 2017 file photo, Congressional candidate Rob Quist meets with supporters during the annual Mansfield Metcalf Celebration dinner hosted by the state's Democratic Party in Helena, Montana. He is trying to fire up the party faithful in his race against Republican Greg Gianforte in a May 25 special election to fill Montana's sole congressional seat. (AP Photo/Bobby Caina Calvan, File)

Hiding his socialism beneath a cowboy hat

- The Washington Times

Fresh from special election defeats in Kansas and Georgia, Democratic professionals and activists alike are focusing on the election to fill Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s Montana congressional seat as one more chance to chip away at the Republican majority in the House.

Afghanistan Peace Plan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Afghanistan crisis

The U.S.-led war in Afghanistan has not only continued unabated for over 15 years, making it America’s longest war, but has no end in sight.

In this April 25, 2017 photo provided by ABC 7 Eyewitness News in New York, a wooden hammock lay on the sidewalk in New York. Police say that an tourist from England was injured and taken to the hospital when the hammock fell from the building she was talking near and struck her. Police believe wind may have blown the wooden framed hammock off the building's terrace. (ABC 7 Eyewitness News via AP)

Taking the cuffs off the cops

The Obama Justice Department made a habit of federalizing local police forces by threatening litigation and securing a settlement in the form of a consent decree. That turned out to be an exercise in anti-police bias which, happily, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is now reversing.

Marine Le Pen (Associated Press)

The status quo survives in France, but in ruins

- The Washington Times

The French easily embrace contradiction and chaos. It’s what makes their politics work: “Plus ca change, plus c’est la meme chose,” and they said it first: “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” The Sunday national election in France proved it again.

Unrest in Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Venezuela’s coming civil war

- The Washington Times

As American public attention has been focusing on terror attacks in Paris, the crisis in Syria and the nuclear-armed lunatic running North Korea, Venezuela to our south is about to explode into violence and civil war with incalculable consequences in our own hemisphere.

Ivanka Trump, listens as her father President Donald Trump, talks via a video conference to astronauts on the International Space Station, Monday, April 24, 2017, from the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

100 days of the GOP eating its own

- The Washington Times

It’s rounding on 100 days of the President Donald Trump administration — and surprise, surprise, it’s not just Democrats who are pointing wild fingers at the White House for this and that, for what have you and what not. criticizing, condemning and generally crying about how things are progressing. It’s Republicans, almost as much.

Illustration on the consequences of questioning current conventional wisdom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shut up and go away

Columbia University, from which I have a degree, has set aside rooms where straight white males — like me — are told they are unwelcome. How should I respond to their annual fund drives?

Illustration on the recent Paris terror attack and the French national elections by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The police vs. the PC police

As is almost always the case, signs of trouble preceded the latest shooting in Paris, which left one police officer dead and wounded two bystanders before police killed the gunman, later identified as French national Karim Cheurfi, a known criminal with a long, violent record. ISIS claimed to be behind the attack. According to police, a note praising ISIS fell out of Cheurfi’s pocket when he fell.

Better-educated Immigrants Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

One-upping Donald Trump’s crackdown on immigration

President Trump’s crackdown on immigrants committing crimes and employers abusing H-1B visas to replace qualified Americans with low-wage foreign workers may be welcome. However, those fall far short of the comprehensive reform needed to better align immigration policy with the needs of the country.

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Antonio Reyes of Brownsville, Texas, stands by the U.S.-Mexico border fence near his home. Reyes said he's seen people scale the border fence that bisects his backyard and jump down in seconds. Sometimes they carry bales of what appear to be drugs. A higher wall is "still not going to stop them," he said. "They'll shotput it or whatever they have to do." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)

Protecting our southern border with U.S. mariners

As chairman of the Coast Guard and Maritime Subcommittee in the House of Representatives, I am proud to be an unwavering defender of the Jones Act — a critical U.S. national security law that requires vessels moving from one U.S. port to another must be U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed.

Illustration on CUFI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A boost for U.S.-Israeli ties

“An unidentified guest uses a Trump Hotel branded umbrella as she walks into the West Wing of the White House,” read the caption of an Associated Press photo in the Washington Examiner picturing an attractive young woman whose face is becoming increasingly familiar in Washington political circles.

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The Death of Obamacare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Not letting the Obamacare crisis go to waste

Republicans should take a lesson from Democrats. During President Obama's battle to enact Obamacare, his chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, famously said, "You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. What I mean by that is an opportunity to do things you could not do before."

A war started by 'carnivorous lemmings'

Today's visitors to the older sections of Charleston, S.C., find themselves in an enchanting time warp. The beguiling facade of the antebellum South -- the mannerly charm, the tastefully understated elegance, even the dignified courtesy of the mostly black service personnel -- all reflect the surface allure of an elegant way of life that has mostly gone with the wind. Happily, what little remains now is supported by the tourist trade rather than by slave labor.

Scalpel, not hatchet fixes voter rolls

In a recent editorial, The Washington Times urges the League of Women Voters and Common Cause to join an effort by Judicial Watch to remove voters from the registration rolls in Montgomery County, Maryland ("Preserving voting rights in Maryland," April 23). Based on our knowledge of Maryland's voter-registration system, we cannot support this misguided effort.

Help or get out

House Speaker Paul Ryan has served in the U.S. House of Representatives since 1999. Prior to becoming speaker in October, 2015, Mr. Ryan served on the House Ways and Means Committee as well as on the House Budget Committee. With all of this experience, why didn't he have a health-care bill ready? Why didn't he have a budget bill? A tax-reform bill?

U.S. special representative for North Korea policy Joseph Yun, center, answers questions from reporters following meeting with Japanese and South Korean chief nuclear negotiators to talk about North Korean issues at the Iikura Guesthouse in Tokyo Tuesday, April 25, 2017. North Korea marks the founding anniversary of its military on Tuesday, and South Korea and its allies are bracing for the possibility that it could conduct another nuclear test or launch an intercontinental ballistic missile for the first time.   U.S. envoy Yun says he and his counterparts from Japan and South Korea agreed to coordinate "all actions" on North Korea. (Toru Yamanaka/Pool Photo via AP)

Getting serious about North Korea

President Trump has called the entire U.S. Senate to the White House Wednesday for a rare top-level briefing on what's going on with "the crazy fat kid" in North Korea. The president will have all hands on deck and he expects 100 senators to be there. They'll be greeted by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Defense Secretary James Mattis, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

President Trump has arguably done more than his predecessors to get the border wall along the U.S. frontier with Mexico finally realized. Despite congressional promises, little construction progress has yet been made. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

A barrier to the wall

The U.S. government just dodged a headlong run into a wall. Democrats threatened to vote against an interim budget deal if President Trump includes a down payment on a wall on the southern border. It's a mark of the lengths politicians of the liberal persuasion will go to destroy the Trump presidency. National security is held hostage in a high-stakes game of chicken.

Former President Barack Obama pauses as he hosts a conversation on civic engagement and community organizing, Monday, April 24, 2017, at the University of Chicago in Chicago. It's the former president's first public event of his post-presidential life in the place where he started his political career. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Obama to net $400,000 in 'fat cat' speech

- The Washington Times

Well, well, well. Guess Barack Obama, who spent much of his eight years in the White House pointing critical fingers at Wall Street and Big Business, isn't as adverse to the buck as he lets on. The ex-prez is about to earn $400,000 to deliver a speech at a Wall Street conference being run by Cantor Fitzgerald LP -- the same type of people Obama used to blast as "fat cats."

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks during a press conference where sanctuary cities, which don't arrest or detain immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, and Chicago violence, two issues raised by President Donald Trump, were discussed on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Matt Marton) ** FILE **

Chicago's Rahm Emanuel pushing more gun control

- The Washington Times

Yes, this is probably the way to go -- when criminals holding illegally owned firearms shoot and kill and pour blood into the city streets, the way to make the community safer is to rip guns out of the hands of legal and permitted owners. That sounds about right. You go, Chicago.