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NARAL Fetus Scale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Skewing data to uphold abortion

In a recent article, NARAL Pro-Choice America released a poll making the startling claim that nearly 70 percent of registered voters say the government should not restrict access to abortion.

ADVANCE FOR SATURDAY, AUG. 30, AND THEREAFTER - FILE - This Aug. 14, 2014, file photo shows New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie as he speaks during a town hall meeting in Ocean City, N.J.  One set of elections ends in early November as another begins when presidential hopefuls cross the unofficial starting line in the 2016 race for the White House. With control of the Senate at stake, the months leading up to the mid-term elections offer a clearer window on a crowd of potential presidential candidates already jockeying for position from Nevada to New Hampshire. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

Killing the death tax

The estate tax, or “death tax,” has been a historical grievance for many American families. Its roots go back to the short-lived stamp tax (1797-1802), and includes the 1862 Revenue Act and 1898 War Revenues Act.

Illustration by Schrank, Handelszeitung, Zurich, Switzerland

Obama’s wobbly foreign policy

One of the critical rules of warfare is to never let the enemy know your plans of how, when and where you will respond.

Illustration on selling Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sell Fannie and Freddie, don’t kill them

It’s time for the U.S. government to sell its ownership stake in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two giant mortgage funders, and let them sink or swim by themselves.

Winston Churchill, leader of the opposition in the present Parliament, shown on grounds of Chartwell, his Westerham, Kent, home on Sept. 20, 1951. (AP Photo)

Behind the sinking of the Lusitania

About how America became involved in certain wars, many conspiracy theories have been advanced — and some have been proved correct.

Julaine Appling, president of Wisconsin Family Action, right, and her organization's attorney Mike Dean, defenders of Wisconsin's state ban on gay marriage, talk to reporters after attending a hearing before the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on the challenges to Indiana and Wisconsin's gay marriage ban Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Europe stands strong for traditional definition of marriage

A court decision issued last month about same-sex marriage received almost no news coverage in the United States, yet the decision could have significant implications when the U.S. Supreme Court decides whether the Constitution requires it.

Government Control of Broadband Services Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Government broadband signals heavier public debt

The rosy picture painted by proponents of government-owned broadband, like President Obama’s Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, couldn’t be more misleading.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'Hot Dogs and Cocktails'

If it is not quite commonplace for British monarchs to visit the United States these days, it is hard for anyone who hasn't been collecting Social Security for some time to grasp just how big a deal it was when King George VI and his Queen Consort visited the United States in 1939.

Incoming Washington Post publisher Fred Ryan (Washington Post photo)

The Washington Post makes room for a Republican publisher

- The Washington Times

Changes of command often occupy the most complicated areas of the media marketplace. In quick succession, a family dynasty is about to end at The Washington Post when Katharine Weymouth steps down as publisher on October 1, to be replaced by one Frederick J. Ryan, Jr. Ms. Weymouth was advised of impending change by Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos in mid-August; the news organization went public with it on Tuesday.