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A Rolling Stone article alleged a gang rape occurred at the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia. The magazine has since issued an apology for the article, saying the reporter's trust in her source was misplaced. (Associated Press)

Bogus stories abound in our pathetic press

Will Rogers, the late American humorist and cornpone philosopher, once said, “All I know is what I read in the papers.” That statement earned him a place in “Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations.” Were he alive today, it would most likely be inviting widespread derision. Today’s newspapers abound with bogus stories.

Illustration on Congress' continuing resolution provisions eroding Constitutional liberties by Alexandr Hunter/The Washington Times

President and Congress are heedless to the limits of their power

When the government is waving at us with its right hand, so to speak, it is the government’s left hand that we should be watching. Just as a magician draws your attention to what he wants you to see so you will not observe how his trick is performed, last week presented a textbook example of public disputes masking hidden deceptions. Here is what happened.

Illustration on the need to identify Islamic terrorism for what it is by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Suicide by political correctness

- The Washington Times

During its coverage of this week’s Islamic terrorist attack in Sydney, Australia, CNN ran a telling banner: “Motivation of suspect unknown.” Motivation unknown? Really?

The Ghost of Flight 93 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thwarting U.S. defenses will lead only to more American victims

The attack on a cafe in Sydney, Australia, by a self-described Islamic cleric with a long police record, left two hostages dead, along with the cleric. That incident, which was televised worldwide, was quickly eclipsed by the massacre of 145 people at an army-run school in Peshawar, Pakistan. How is the West responding to these and other atrocities? More important, how is the Muslim world responding?

This is a copy of the cover of the CIA torture report released by Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein D-Calif., Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014. U.S. Senate investigators delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogations Tuesday, accusing the spy agency of inflicting suffering on prisoners beyond its legal limits and peddling unsubstantiated stories that the harsh questioning saved American lives.  (AP Photo)

The truth about the CIA, torture, and congressional ingratitude

The truth – that enhanced interrogations saved lives, frightened other terrorists to not act, uncovered plots, and showed any al Qaeda wannabees that joining in would have serious personal consequences – is completely missing from the Senate Democrats’ report.

Blind Partisanship Donkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ wasteful torture report

The recent release of a Senate report commissioned by Democrats regarding torture of terrorism suspects in order to obtain vital information was, in my opinion, a waste of $40 million of taxpayer money.

FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2014 file photo, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, after Senate Democrats voted on leadership positions for the 114th Congress.  Two years after first being elected to the Senate, Warren had a notable sophomore year, winning a leadership role and making her first official overseas trip, even as her party lost control of the Senate. From left are, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Warren, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The Democratic divide

The liberal news media have been gleefully reporting the GOP’s political quarrels for many years. That exaggerated storyline all but vanished last week, though, in the aftermath of the Democrats’ humiliating defeats in the midterm elections.

"Bumpering" Hillary 2016 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pining for Elizabeth Warren

Barack Obama is so yesterday. The elitists who supported him as the great “progressive” hope are abandoning him in droves as his popularity plummets. The Washington Post describes him as having the “worst” year of anyone in Washington, and as Republicans prepare to take over the Senate, he looks more and more like a lame duck incapable of delivering much more of anything to his base.

Illustration on the need for enhanced interrogation for national security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

America needs its rough men

In spring 2009, I was invited to debate “torture” with Jon Stewart on “The Daily Show.” He gave me an opportunity to make a case with which he vehemently disagreed. He didn’t spout prepackaged sound bites — he presented thoughtful counterarguments. Not many television talk show hosts are willing — or able — to do that.

Karl Rove, a personable fellow who was deputy chief of staff in George W. Bush's White House and is sometimes credited with being the genius of George W.'s success, turns out to be a big fan of "rectal feeding," as used by the CIA to persuade terror suspects to spill their secrets.  (Associated Press/File)

Be careful who takes you to lunch

- The Washington Times

Lunch can sometimes be a big deal in Washington. Lunch is where alliances are struck, deals are made, and sometimes where foes become more or less friends over a shrimp cocktail or a chicken salad at the Palm. But if Karl Rove invites you to lunch, be sure you get to pick the restaurant.

Illustration on Saudi Arabia's strategic use of its oil supply by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Saudis allow falling oil prices to squeeze archrival Iran

Conventional wisdom in Western capitals holds that Saudi Arabia has held firm in sessions with its OPEC partners against lowering production — which would restore higher prices — in order to maintain its market share in countries belonging to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and to dissuade investors from pouring more money into growing North American shale and tar sands production.

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Terrorists don’t respond to questioning

The Feinstein hit on the CIA has occasioned a new round of soul-searching ("Democrats define 'politicization' with so-called torture report," Web, Dec. 15). Can we define torture, or is it subjective? Should we apply the Potter Stewart approach to the definition of torture, recalling that the Supreme Court justice acknowledged that he could not define obscenity but knew it when he saw it? It seems that torture, like beauty or obscenity, is in the eye of the beholder, that waterboarding holds water in some quarters but is torture in others.

Protesters outside of Cafe Versailles on Calle Ocho in Miami,  decry the exchange of convicted Cuban spies, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014,  for USAID subcontractor Alan Gross, who has been held by the Cuban government. (AP Photo/El Nuevo Herald, Roberto Koltun)  MAGS OUT

Making nice with the Castro brothers betrays their victims

Sen. Marco Rubio calls President Obama's remarkable gift to the Castro brothers, and agreement to "normalize" American relations with Cuba, the work of a "willfully ignorant" man. We hope so. Ignorance can be corrected. Perhaps, to put the most generous face on it, this deal originated in the bowels of White House incompetence that is the mark of this administration. But Mr. Obama may not be ignorant at all, willful or otherwise, but proceeding skillfully to radicalize America's place in the world to fit the wishes and dreams of the determined and radical left from which the president sprang.

Greenpeace has legacy of destruction

Greenpeace's desecration of the World Heritage-designated Nazca Lines in Peru is just the latest appalling offense the ultraradical organization has committed ("Greenpeace's Nazca lines stunt prompts Peru to seek criminal charges," Web, Dec. 11). Greenpeace activists have attempted to storm oil platforms, have destroyed crops and trespassed at nuclear power facilities. While these activists may think they're getting their message out, all they're really doing is disrupting life for the public and now risking doing grave damage to what the United Nations has determined is "a masterpiece of human creative genius."

Ben Carson and Armstrong Williams plus a security detail during their eight-day journey to Israel (Photo from Armstrong Williams Productions)

Ben Carson, midway through a trip to Israel - sees the realities of the Holy Land

- The Washington Times

Ben Carson is midway through a significant trip to Israel to see the Holy Land for himself - including the spiritual, political and security-minded factors that are realities for the nation. His journey includes a visit to Nazareth, Galilee and Bethlehem - along with tours of the Gaza strip, terrorist tunnels, a military base and Hadassah Medical Center

BOOK REVIEW: 'Selected Letters of Norman Mailer'

Last year, J. Michael Lennon, Norman Mailer's authorized biographer, brought out nearly 1,000 pages packed with everything thought or said by or about Mailer, his life, his friends and enemies, his work that seemed to obviate the need for any further biographical data. But a year has passed, and Mr. Lennon (also Mailer's official archivist) is back with a volume, nearly as thick and heavy, of Mailer's correspondence.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Insurrections of the mind: 100 years of politics and culture in America'

This collection, intended to be in celebration of the New Republic's centenary, will be looked at more as a requiem. This month, the magazine's editor, Franklin Foer, and its long-standing and widely respected literary editor, Leon Wieseltier, left the magazine after a difference in vision with the owner, 30-year-old Chris Hughes. The magazine is moving back to New York City — its home for the first decades of its existence — and will be transformed, in the words of Mr. Hughes, into a "digital media company." Mr. Hughes purchased the company only two years ago but seems to have tired of its place in American letters.

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Dec. 12, 2104, as the Senate considers a spending bill. The House has passed an additional stopgap spending to make certain the government doesn't shut down at midnight Saturday when current funding authority runs out. The move would give the Senate additional time to process a $1.1 trillion government-wide spending bill.  (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)

Ready, fire, aim

Ted Cruz is a brave conservative who, unlike some of his fellows, does not quail at the sound of the guns. He sets an example others could emulate. His tenacity, both at the grass roots where he has many friends and in Washington where he seems to have few, gives the conservative coalition a much-needed shot of testosterone in its flabby arm. His stand-up attitude is particularly valuable as Democrats try to figure out who they are and who they want to be in the wake of the thumping they took in November.