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Stanton Evans Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tribute to Stan Evans

At last year’s CPAC Reagan banquet, Stan Evans regaled attendees with tales of the early days of the American Conservative Union. His remarks — oh so accurate, oh so funny, and preserved for posterity on YouTube — conveyed important history lessons.

Freedom yes, redefining marriage no

By an almost 2-1 margin, Americans in a recent poll declared they agree that “States and citizens should remain free to uphold marriage as the union of a man and a woman and the Supreme Court shouldn’t force all 50 states to redefine marriage.”

Muzzling the Government Watchdog Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Losing both bark and bite over Hillary’s emails

Outrage over the revelation of Hillary Clinton’s exclusive use of her personal email during her time at the State Department has brought broad-based criticism from the entire political spectrum. (In fact, it was the lefty New York Times that broke the story.)

President Barack Obama introduces first lady Michelle Obama in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015, as they announce their ‘Let Girls Learn’ initiative. The Obama administration is expanding efforts and directing a variety of federal agencies to work with other countries to help young girls worldwide attend and stay in school. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A crippled presidency

If someone were writing a book about America at this point in time, it should be titled “The Decline and Fall of Barack Obama’s Presidency.”

Soldiers listen to U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015. Carter is making his first trip to visit troops and commanders in Afghanistan since his swearing-in this week. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)

Vanquishing the enemy

As the Islamic State and other militant Islamist groups are attracting young men and women into its ranks, will we honor the primary duty of the federal government?

In this March 3, 2015, photo, President Barack Obama speaks about Iran and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress during a meeting with Defense Secretary Ashton Carter in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The audacity of weakness

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke to Congress on Tuesday to warn Americans of the anti-Western threats from theocratic — and likely to soon be nuclear — Iran.

The Court and the Burwell Obamacare Case Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A prescription for health care after Burwell

On Wednesday, the nine justices of the United States Supreme Court will consider the case of King v. Burwell, concerning the constitutionality of Obamacare, determining the limits of President Obama’s executive power and the ability of the president to rewrite laws on his own while ignoring the constitutional duties of the legislative branch of government.

A Nuclear-Armed Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dubious deal of the century

Remember when President Obama said that to prevent the Islamic Republic of Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapons capability, he would keep all options “on the table”? How long has it been since anyone took that warning seriously?

The Tarheels Step on Themselves Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cleaning up the campus boondoggles

Readers of this column are familiar with my argument that a conservative tide is sweeping the country, contrary to the mainstream media. In the off-year elections of 2010 and 2014, the gains made by conservatives have been substantial in governors’ mansions and in state legislatures. To be sure, they have been substantial in Washington, too, at the House and Senate level, but I would argue that they have been more consequential at the state level. There, old conventions that have been in place since the left-wing 1960s are being heaved out and a clamor of protest is being heard from the evicted. It can only get worse.

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a cabinet meeting in the Red Room at the Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015, in Albany, N.Y. Cuomo says he has not been subpoenaed or contacted by federal investigators probing Albany corruption, but he won't say if the same is true for his aides. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

Saying no to prosperity

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Or leave 'em, depending. Several struggling towns in upstate New York look across the state line at Pennsylvania and are thinking about secession, not from the union but from New York. After years of timid waffling, Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said no to fracking, the method of drilling for oil and gas that is making Pennsylvania prosperous. Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, could be the key to putting a jingle into the pockets of New Yorkers, and improving the state's dreary and desolate business climate.

Stark contrast between Netanyahu, Obama

The contrasts between U.S. President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu were evident this week in the content of Mr. Netanyahu's speech to Congress and the pre- and post-speech attacks by Mr. Obama and his administration ("Obama strikes back, scolds Benjamin Netanyahu for offering 'nothing new,'" Web, March 3). Mr. Netanyahu was admonished for accepting the invitation to speak, but he demonstrated leadership and a commitment to do everything in his power to protect his citizens against the threat by Iran to eradicate Israel.

Dangerous tours in Botswana

The terror of a massacre on safari in Botswana is linked to the gruesome killing of a Boston taxidermist in "Die Again," a fast-paced thriller.

Don’t reward law-breaking office

Civil-rights commissioners rightly objected to President Obama's proposed budget increase for the lawbreakers at the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, where I used to work ("Civil rights commissioners: Rein in education admin. on 'unlawful' bullying, sexual assault policies," Web, March 4).

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., right, accompanied by Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, outline their ideas for a new tax plan during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 4, 2015.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Getting started on tax reform

Everybody talks about tax reform but nobody ever gets around to doing something about it. Now two Republican senators, Marco Rubio of Florida and Mike Lee of Utah, have introduced a proposal that embraces both pro-growth and pro-family concerns and simplifies the mess that is the current federal tax code. It's a start.

Veteran NBC newsman Lester Holt is currently filling in for "Nightly News" anchorman Brian Williams, who has taken leave while questions about his credibility are sorted out by the network. (NBC News)

While Brian Williams waits out suspension, NBC News veteran Lester Holt ups the ratings

- The Washington Times

The substitute has bested the regular. NBC News veteran anchorman Lester Holt has upped the ratings at his network while substituting for Brian Williams, currently waiting out his six-month suspension from the job. Nielsen numbers reveal that Mr. Holt draws 10.1 million viewers each night — a rare milestone, and one that rival networks have not reached in eight seasons, according to AdAge. Mr. Holt has also increased the much coveted 25-54-year-old viewing audience by 6 percent, and NBC now leads CBS ad ABC.

Obama's Iranian Nuclear Negotiations Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama ‘fundamentally transforms’ the Middle East

Of his many disgraceful blow-offs of our key allies — returning the bust of Winston Churchill to Great Britain, refusing to march in Paris after the Charlie Hebdo massacre, vetoing the Keystone XL pipeline coming from Canada — President Obama's epic dis of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu this week takes the cake.

A rendition of a now-scrapped Arlington streetcar line.

No desire for a streetcar

Nearly everybody likes a streetcar, but most of them live only in the memories of old folks. Once upon a time streetcars ran nearly everywhere in nearly every big city in America, and in a lot of not-so-big cities. Two hundred miles of track, for example, tied Washington to its suburbs in Virginia and Maryland.