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George Washington   From a portrait by Gilbert Stuart

The body politic grows soft and fat

The Founding Fathers tried to warn us about runaway partisan outrage, but they didn’t listen to themselves. We’ve been paying for it ever since. Now there’s not much we can do about it.

Better credit card protections

Protecting Americans from online threats is clearly taking a rightful place at the top of Congress’ priority list, evident in the celebration of “Cyber Week” through Friday and the pending introduction of long-anticipated cybersecurity legislation.

The Washington Times celebrates the U.S. Constitution 227 years after ratification. (VIDEO screenshot) ** FILE **

Recovering ‘Our Lost Constitution’

Finding Americans fed up with governmental abuses isn’t hard. They wonder why we have politicians who spend too much, bureaucrats who regulate too much, and officials who limit our freedom at almost every turn.

Illustration on the IMF's chronic misunderstanding the causes of economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hammering global growth with faulty monetary policy

This past week, the International Monetary Fund again lowered its global economic forecast for 2015. From 2003 to 2007, real global growth in gross domestic product averaged more than 5 percent, but during the last five years it has averaged less than 3 percent. During the last six years of both the Reagan and Clinton administrations, real GDP growth averaged more than 4 percent in the United States, but growth has averaged only a little over 2 percent since the recession bottomed out in 2009.

Illustration on failed civics education in the nation's schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Flunking civics means apathy reigns

It’s an old joke, but one that is a commentary on our times. A pollster asks: “What do you think about the level of ignorance and apathy in the country?” The person replies: “I don’t know and I don’t care.”

Putin outwits Obama on Iranian missile deal illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Putin undermines the Iran deal

Vladimir Putin’s decision to lift Russia’s embargo on the sale of surface-to-air missiles to Iran is a reminder that we have to walk and chew gum at the same time. While we engage in the political self-absorption that consumes us for two out of every four years, we can’t afford to ignore nations such as Russia and Iran, especially when they act in concert.

Illustration on the green economic oppression of American working people by the rich by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Greens against the poor

Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Elizabeth Warren and the whole gang of Democratic leaders claim that one of their highest priorities is to lift up the middle class and reduce the income gap between rich and poor.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross", service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. Clergymen from Christian churches in the borough organize a trek with volunteers carrying the wooden cross through borough streets to the cemetery as part of their services for the holiday. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

The preservation of tolerance

In the U.S. and around the world, Christians face extraordinary physical and psychological persecution.

A house is reflected in a puddle of water from an irrigated front yard in San Diego. State regulators on Saturday, April 18, 2015  announced a revised plan to reduce water use in drought-stricken California that offers easier conservation targets for major cities, including Los Angeles, while demanding greater cutbacks from others. The new water reduction targets released by the State Water Resources Control Board responds to criticisms from cities that said earlier targets were unrealistic and unfair. Recognizing that some communities are farther along than others in conservation, the water board released a draft plan last week that requires varying levels of cutbacks for cities to ensure enough water if dry conditions persist. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

In California, a flood of missed opportunities

We all learn at an early age to save money for a rainy day. We can’t assume that we’ll always be as healthy or well paid as we are today, so we set something aside to help make it through trying times.

(Associated Press) ** FILE **

The land of the cheerful giver

The Lord loveth a cheerful giver, as the Apostle Paul tells us, and some of the most generous givers are the most cheerful among the faithful, and they live among us in America.

Scimitar canary illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Islamic jihad comes to campus

The world is witnessing a resurgence of global anti-Semitism not seen since the 1930s and the “Final Solution.” In the Middle East, Hitler-admiring regimes like Iran, and Hitler-admiring parties like Hezbollah, Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, are openly planning to finish the job the Nazis started. Even in America, until now the most hospitable place outside of Israel for Jews, the atmosphere is more hostile than at any time in the last 70 years.

Illustration on the history of successful presidents passing a "third term" to their political successors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The odds against a presidential three-peat

Republicans looking ahead to 2016 take heart: History is on your side. For more than a century, only twice has a party held the White House for at least three consecutive presidential elections. Both times, it took each party’s greatest president of this period — Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan — to accomplished the feat. That fact should be a major concern to Democrats, who will be seeking their party’s third consecutive term on President Obama’s record.

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Obama befriending communists

President Obama is getting quite chummy with Raul Castro, the president of Cuba. Cuba is the only communist country in this hemisphere. Apparently Mr. Obama needs to be told that Raul Castro is the brother of Fidel Castro, the man who allied himself with the Russians to nuke the United States.

Reconsider 'Lives Matter' slogans

It's time to praise the police and stop the mindless, politically correct protests and their Al Sharpton-style slogans, such as "Hands Up Don't Shoot," "Black Lives Matter" and more recently "All Lives Matter."

FILE - In this April 4, 2015, file photo, from video provided by Attorney L. Chris Stewart representing the family of Walter Lamer Scott, Scott appears to be running away from City Patrolman Michael Thomas Slager, right, in North Charleston, S.C. Slager was charged with murder on Tuesday, April 7, hours after law enforcement officials viewed the dramatic video that appears to show him shooting a fleeing Scott several times in the back. (AP Photo/Courtesy of L. Chris Stewart, File)

Race and police brutality

Police brutality is real, and there are bad cops among the good. Police brutality and police misbehavior must be swiftly and firmly punished when and where it occurs. A star on a policeman's breast confers responsibility along with authority.

Retiring Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, has long opposed a nuclear waste site at Yucca Mountain, said it is "not something I will ever accept."

Bury the death tax

The House of Representatives approved legislation last week to abolish the death tax, and the vote was not close — 240 to 179. Democrats joined Republicans for the first vote on the death tax in nearly a decade. This is an issue that must come up every year until the tax is killed permanently and decisively until it is graveyard dead.

The Civil War and the generals who fought it

For serious historians of the Civil War, William C. Davis is the ultimate go-to source for reliable information on a conflict that spawned a staggering amount of mythology. He is the author of more than 50 books on the war and the South, and until recently was director of the Virginia Center for Civil War History at Virginia Tech.

Reporters race after Hillary Clinton's van during her first campaign stop in Iowa. (MSNBC)

Hillary galvanizes the press, earning twice as much recognition as Repubicans: Poll

- The Washington Times

Does the news media favor Hillary Clinton? Analysts bicker about it even as journalists scramble after the Democratic hopeful wherever she may be - though formal press conferences are a rarity in her campaign so far. A new poll, however, suggests that the press is at least very eager to cover Mrs. Clinton, and it's having an impact: 66 percent of Americans now say they've heard "a lot" about Mrs. Clinton's presidential intentions. Only 46 percent say they've heard a lot about the 2016 election itself - and far less have been up close and personal with the GOP presidential hopefuls. That percentage is in the 30s.

Don't let killers mar memories

April 15 marked the second anniversary of the deadly Boston Marathon bombings in Massachusetts. Two desperate men with a horrific plan killed three people and injured more than 260. I can personally remember sitting rigid in my high school classroom watching as the live newscast explained the events earlier that day. I waited with bated breath while the search for the perpetrators began and breathed a sigh of relief when those responsible for the carnage were apprehended. However, the dread I felt in the immediate aftermath was different from that of my classmates. A combination of dread and resignation that has never felt routine surrounded me and I, along with the rest of America, heard the religious background of the culprits: Muslim. Again.

Rethink jobs, tax-cut link

In "To win the White House, talk jobs" (Web, April 11) Donald Lambro writes, "Go to the Gallup website that lists the issues that trouble Americans most and you'll find the economy and jobs are far and away the 'most important problems' they face ... . Republicans should be relentlessly pounding this issue with all they've got." If a Republican is elected president in 2016, he will discover what Barack Obama discovered in 2009: It is easier to run against a bad economy than it to fix it.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks at a Republican Leadership Summit in Nashua, N.H., April 17, 2015. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Waffling toward the starting gate

Only yesterday Jeb Bush was the Republican flavor of the week, the favorite of the Republican establishment, those wonderful folks who yearn for a nice man who oozes political propriety and respectability. Establishment Republicans — Rockefeller Republicans, they were once called — live in dread of frightening the horses.