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Winston Churchill, leader of the opposition in the present Parliament, shown on grounds of Chartwell, his Westerham, Kent, home on Sept. 20, 1951. (AP Photo)

Behind the sinking of the Lusitania

About how America became involved in certain wars, many conspiracy theories have been advanced — and some have been proved correct.

Julaine Appling, president of Wisconsin Family Action, right, and her organization's attorney Mike Dean, defenders of Wisconsin's state ban on gay marriage, talk to reporters after attending a hearing before the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on the challenges to Indiana and Wisconsin's gay marriage ban Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Europe stands strong for traditional definition of marriage

A court decision issued last month about same-sex marriage received almost no news coverage in the United States, yet the decision could have significant implications when the U.S. Supreme Court decides whether the Constitution requires it.

Government Control of Broadband Services Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Government broadband signals heavier public debt

The rosy picture painted by proponents of government-owned broadband, like President Obama’s Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler, couldn’t be more misleading.

Hong Kong Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hong Kong’s miraculous progress

How did this small city-state of 7.3 million people go from having a per-capita income of only a few hundred dollars per year to a per-capita income that is equal to that of the United States in only 50 years?

Labor Day Americana Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Labor Day, a misnamed holiday

No American holiday is as unusual as Labor Day. As legal holidays go, Labor Day isn’t very old.

The Left Attacking the Tea Party Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The mainstreaming of liberalism

One of the curious aspects of the Tea Party’s emergence during the past four years is the extent to which the mainstream media have fostered the idea that this political phenomenon represents a kind of radicalism.

Country Civility Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The source of civility

Even in the silence of the timeless Great Smoky Mountains, it’s nearly impossible to get away from the world’s aches and pains — not to mention horrors. The only way to do it is to unplug completely.

Chinese Threat to IT Development Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The frightening emergence of government patent trolls

When the Chinese government announced in April it was establishing a government-controlled patent-operations fund in April, there were few people besides Asian trade analysts who gave the news much attention.

Education Priorities Illustration By Donna Grethen

Transforming labor with school choice

This Labor Day, many Americans will use the holiday to wind down the summer, cook out with friends, or get a long weekend away.

Related Articles

Incoming Washington Post publisher Fred Ryan (Washington Post photo)

The Washington Post makes room for a Republican publisher

- The Washington Times

Changes of command often occupy the most complicated areas of the media marketplace. In quick succession, a family dynasty is about to end at The Washington Post when Katharine Weymouth steps down as publisher on October 1, to be replaced by one Frederick J. Ryan, Jr. Ms. Weymouth was advised of impending change by Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos in mid-August; the news organization went public with it on Tuesday.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hot Dogs and Cocktails'

If it is not quite commonplace for British monarchs to visit the United States these days, it is hard for anyone who hasn't been collecting Social Security for some time to grasp just how big a deal it was when King George VI and his Queen Consort visited the United States in 1939.

Microsoft co-founder and Berkshire Hathaway board member Bill Gates gestures during an interview with Liz Claman on the Fox Business Network in Omaha, Neb., Monday, May 5, 2014. The annual Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting concluded over the weekend. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

Restarting the Common Core debate

Over the past couple of years, a raucous debate has emerged over the Common Core, content standards in English and mathematics adopted by states nationwide.