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Positive Messages Hit the Mark Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatism, the Chevy of American leadership

Imagine General Motors trying to sell you a Chevy truck by airing an ad featuring a Ford F-150 pickup truck bursting into flames, killing a family of four and ending with anguished relatives waiting for news of their loved ones in a hospital emergency room.

Illustration on adjusting Section 215 of the Patriot Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Amending the Patriot Act, not ending it

The Senate, which will never be known for an overly demanding work schedule, returns from its week-long recess a whole day early to deal with the mess being made of one of our most important anti-terrorist intelligence programs. That program, now encompassed by Section 215 of the unfortunately named Patriot Act, has its roots in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA.

Illistration on adjusting Export-Import bank policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Reaganesque solution to the Ex-Im Bank dilemma

Opposition to the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) is now at the point where the bank’s reauthorization is genuinely in doubt. Spurred by accusations of corporate welfare, crony capitalism and outright corruption, opponents believe the Ex-Im Bank’s palpable violation of free-market principles fully warrants its early demise.

This undated colorized transmission electron micrograph image made available by the CDC shows an Ebola virus virion. For the first time, Ebola has been discovered inside the eyes of a patient months after the virus was gone from his blood, according to a report published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, May 7, 2015. (Frederick Murphy/CDC via AP)

A little good news about Ebola

- The Washington Times

The news from Africa and the Third World is seldom good, and much of the bad news is about disease born of ignorance, superstition and primitive sanitation, news dispatched by a media addicted to tales of unrelieved gloom, certain doom and inevitable disaster.

Unions Helped by Obama Appointees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping workers in the dark

Two of Sen. Harry Reid’s controversial legislative maneuvers are coming back to haunt American workers. In 2013, then-Majority Leader Reid’s threat to eviscerate the judicial filibuster cowed enough Senate Republicans to approve Big Labor’s handpicked candidates to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). A few months later, Mr. Reid acted on his threat to gut the filibuster and installed three of President Obama’s nominees on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Missing world leader by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the JV team of world leaders

British Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent stunning victory for his Conservative party catapulted him to one of the three top Western world leaders, alongside Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Francois Hollande. Mr. Cameron wasn’t supposed to win for numerous reasons, not the least of which because of his austerity policies and vigorous opposition from Labor and Liberal parties that thought a bigger government was the key to Britain’s growth.

Illustration on missing Muldovan bank funds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Who took Moldova’s millions — the crooks or the Kremlin?

On the eve of a national election in tiny Moldova last November, $450 million — equal to 10 percent of the Eastern European country’s entire annual gross domestic product — went missing. So far, no one knows where it went.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Chamber of Corporate Welfare

Here’s a half-serious question: How much do taxpayers have to pay off Boeing to make the Export-Import Bank — finally and irrevocably — go away? If the feds wrote a check to Boeing for $100 million, would they then let the Ex-Im Bank die a merciful and long overdue death?

Illustration on the abuse of citizens' rights under current government surveillance laws by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A better Patriot Act

Critical parts of the USA Patriot Act are about to expire. The reauthorization bill moving through Congress, the USA Freedom Act, has sparked controversy on both sides of the political aisle and within the civil-libertarian community, rekindling debates that began more than a decade ago. Now is the chance to implement much-needed reforms, including reforms to a provision not expiring: the one authorizing National Security Letters (NSL).

Paying heed to the walking wounded

A few days ago I received a thank you note from an American soldier who has been struggling with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As with many victims of TBI and PTSD, it had taken him a while to realize the true nature of his injury and to seek professional help.

Related Articles

Going Two Ways at Once Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Climate change hypocrisy

Most leftists operate in a haze of hypocrisy, blinded by a total lack of self-awareness. They preach sanctimoniously to the rest of us about how we should lead our lives, usually without a compulsion to lead their lives in similar fashion. The "rules" they generate and enforce through intimidation, fear and often the force of government, are for the rest of us suckers. Case in point: Democrats trying to stick us with the horrors of Obamacare while demanding exemptions for their political cronies -- and for themselves.

No substitute for seriousness in Iraq

A recent weekend brought two very different dispatches from the front lines of the global war on terror. The first was a tale of tactical success; the second a narrative of strategic failure.

Rodgers and Hart before Hollywood

Even the most talented composer of songs is lucky if he can find one lyricist as a collaborator, but Richard Rodgers was blessed with two great ones, first Lorenz Hart and then Oscar Hammerstein.

Disorder on the border

Texas is flooded, and it's not just the water. The state has been inundated with illegal immigrants surging across its border, egged on by President Obama's unprecedented grant of amnesty to millions who have no right to be here. Though powerless to stop the rain, a federal court has reinforced a legal barrier meant to stem the flow of humanity that threatens chaos in Texas and other border states. The tide of lawlessness may be turning.

Policing for profit

Reform of civil-forfeiture laws is an idea whose time has come. This is an issue that unites conservatives and liberals, Republicans and Democrats. FreedomWorks, on the right, and the Center for American Progress, on the left, invited writers, bloggers and think-tank analysts to a daylong conference the other day to talk about abuses of civil-forfeiture, which the Heritage Foundation rightly calls "a legal tool that allows law enforcement officials to seize property that they assert has been involved in certain criminal activity."

CNN, the sinking ship

I just watched an hourlong special on CNN, "35 Years of CNN," primarily because nothing else was on. This program amounted to 60 minutes of news personalities boasting about the network being the "only news organization" present at major historical events, such as the beginning of the Iraq war. I found all this in-house hype entertaining. CNN has, in fact, been on the air 35 years. But what has it accomplished in three-and-a-half decades? Not much, if anything.

Tax reform headed in wrong direction

As a small-business owner, I am concerned by what I've read and heard regarding Congress' efforts to overhaul our overly burdensome tax system. I support reforming the tax system to make it simpler and easier for all businesses to understand, but I worry that what Congress is proposing will be a tax-reform system geared toward large corporations, and that it will leave small businesses holding the bag and without any relief.

Then-New York Gov. George Pataki (right) is now poised to enter the GOP race for 2016, saying the party needs to veer away from social issues and concentrate more on fiscal responsibility and conservative principles. (Associated Press)

George Pataki next up to announce presidential intent, vows to 'defeat Islamic terror'

- The Washington Times

Another 24 hours, and another Republican hopeful comes to call on American voters. George Pataki will announce his plans to run for president on Thursday morning; with a touch of drama, the former New York governor will journey to Exeter, New Hampshire for his big reveal. The historic town of 9,242 was more or less the birthplace of the Republican Party, founded in 1853 right there in the local Squamscott Hotel.

Ferreting out the fakers

Fairly or not, polygraph examiners for the Central Intelligence Agency and other institutions that require security clearances for staff are not necessarily the most popular guys in the coffee shop. And for good reason: much of their professional lives are devoted to ferreting out secrets their subjects would prefer to leave untold.

Illustration on alternatives to inner-city public schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An escape route from inner-city schools

Before he passed away recently, John M. Templeton, the distinguished physician and philanthropist, questioned: "Should we tolerate a public educational system with its entrenched self-interest which virtually every inner-city parent knows is destroying any hope or possibility of their children achieving meaningful opportunity in a 21st century economy?" A growing number of parents say no.