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The Annual Academy Liberal Awards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How not to embarrass Oscar

When you give your acceptance speeches, thank your publicist, limo driver, manicurist, masseuse, day nanny, night nanny and weekend nanny. Your attorney Marty Singer for killing that salacious National Enquirer story.

Illustration on the need to clean house at U.S. intelligence agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rousting the anti-Flynn cabal

In the anti-Trump media war, it is nearly impossible to keep the names straight without a scorecard. Barely had Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn’s name faded from the news cycle than he was replaced by H.R. McMaster, another lieutenant general most Americans have never heard of. Will this latest general be any more fortunate than his predecessor? Only if he can overcome the frenzied machinations of the Obama deep state.

President Donald Trump, right, speaks as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, listens at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The downside of a Trump tariff

When word got out in January 1848 that gold had been discovered at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California, near Sacramento, it triggered the famous California Gold Rush, which in a few short years brought some 300,000 fortune seekers to the territory, whose population at the time was just 155,000, most of them Native Americans.

Attack on the Earth by the Evil Empire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Time’s misreading of science

As demonstrated by the confirmation hearings of Scott Pruitt for new Environmental Protection Agency chief, all-out war is being waged against the Trump administration by leftists who believe science is under attack from the evil empire.

President Donald Trump walks with Housing and Urban Development Secretary-designate Dr. Ben Carson, as they pass a exhibit honoring Carson during a tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Trump-Reagan parallels

The media laugh at any attempt to compare President Trump with former President Ronald Reagan, but there are many similarities, not the least of which are the withering attacks both men endured while running for and as president.

Milo Yiannopoulos      Associated Press photo

An expensive lesson for conservatives

- The Washington Times

The more the culture bounds out of control, the more the wary have to take care with the company they keep. This applies to media that will print anything in pursuit of “clicks” and “hits,” and to well-meaning organizations about whom they invite to tutor their true believers.

No deal for a two-state solution

“The president is committed to peace. That’s as far as I want to go on that,” said President Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer, on Feb. 3 in answer to a reporter’s inquiry regarding the Trump administration’s position on the “two-state solution” for peace between the Palestinians and Israelis. Will Mr. Trump push the two-state paradigm, like George W. Bush and Barack Obama before him, or will the White House realize that this idea is a dangerous fantasy like the irrational Iran nuclear deal?

Retirement Planning Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing for the long term

Ordinary investors can’t be blamed for hesitancy about stocks with market indexes trading near record levels and President Trump’s radical, sometimes quixotic ideas creating so much uncertainty. Yet patience and a diversified portfolio remain the best long-term investment strategy.

FILE - This 2015 file photo provided by the Bloomington Normal Airport Authority shows a damaged wing of a Cirrus SR22 single-engine plane at the Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. Once seen as a luxury of the corporate world, private planes are becoming increasingly common at U.S. colleges and universities as schools try to attract athletes, raise money and reward coaches with jet-set vacations. Iowa State University President Steven Leath, a pilot, acknowledged last year that he used a school plane for trips that mixed personal and university business, a practice that came to light after he damaged the aircraft in a hard landing. (Bloomington Normal Airport Authority via AP, File)

TripAdvisor’s Stockholm Syndrome

Despite producing huge amounts of value for society, businesses are among the most vilified institutions in America.

Illustration on the drawbacks of Obamacare risk pools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to lower Obamacare premiums

The Affordable Care Act is in a “death spiral,” warns Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini. Premiums have doubled since the end of 2013, and yet insurers are rapidly exiting the individual market, leaving consumers in many parts of the nation at risk of having no coverage.

Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It’s been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council — an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies — President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America’s anti-growth tax system.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump’s hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can’t agree on the replacement “plan.”

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Looking back at who Obama could have been

In the great swirl of people and ideas and the high winds of political rhetoric and journalistic overkill howling through Washington during the early days of the Trump administration, it's hard to remember just what preceded it all -- an extended period of not much presided over by a somewhat detached figure with an academic sense of irony who did no irreparable damage, presided over no catastrophes, quietly turned over the keys to the White House when the moment arrived, and just as quietly, seemed almost to fade away.

Illustration on the realities confronting Saudi Arabia's "industrial revolution" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The kingdom, the power and the oil

Saudi Arabia is changing. When government officials here tell you that, you take it with an oversized grain of salt. But when Saudi human rights activists say the same, you pay attention.

Illustration on President Obama's comparative literary stature by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama compares himself to Abraham Lincoln, but 44 and grammar do not agree

Did you know this? "Not since Lincoln has there been a president as fundamentally shaped -- in his life, convictions and outlook on the world -- by reading and writing as Barack Obama." Frankly, I did not know President Obama was so wedded to books and the printed word as to be compared to Abraham Lincoln, author of the Gettysburg Address, magisterial Second Inaugural, and devotee of Shakespeare.

Annette Smith     The Washington Times

Vermont's unsung hero

After years of battling the powers that be in relative anonymity, in January the Burlington Free Press named Annette Smith "Vermonter of the Year." That's a much kinder title than some others have applied.

Maple tree sap drips from a tap into a bucket, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Brookline, N.H. Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-NH, led a discussion with maple syrup producers in New Hampshire about how climate change is impacting their industry. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Carbonated politics

Every problem in Washington finally finds a solution, and it's usually called a tax. A group of policy mavens, eager to do something for everybody, proposes to tax carbon, the substance found in all forms of fossil fuels. It's the fourth-most abundant element in the universe. The idea is that if there's a levy on the carbon content of oil, coal and natural gas, consumers will use less of it. Presto! No more human-caused global warming. But it still smells like a tax.

Stranded vehicles stand loaded with goods after the Jammu-Srinagar highway remained closed, at Jammu, India, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017. The Jammu-Srinagar national highway remained closed for vehicular traffic for the second day Tuesday following landslides triggered by rains, officials said. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Unhappy motoring ahead

After years of slow but steady decline, traffic fatalities on the nation's highways and byways are increasing again. If the death and injury toll continues to rise in the years ahead, it's likely the fault of government supervision gone awry.

Professor should apologize

A college student who recorded a professor making anti-Trump comments allegedly violated a policy that "prohibits the recording of someone on district property without that person's knowledge or consent" ("Caleb O'Neil, Orange Coast College student, suspended for recording professor's anti-Trump rant," Web, Feb. 15). What is the college's policy on a professor teaching hatred and vitriol about the president of the United States to students whose parents probably pay an enormous amount for their offspring to learn something of value, not to hear disparaging words about the leader of the free world?

Stop 'death by decree'

Congress can stop the "death by decree" simply by writing regulation into statute ("Congress must stop death by decree," Web, Feb. 19). Members and staff who draft legislation can concurrently envision how they want the law carried out and put those ideas (including a cost cap) into the proposed statute, thus leaving no ambiguity or discretion to the executive branch.

President Donald Trump, center, speaks while seated with Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, and retired Army Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg, right, at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser.  Kellogg, who had been his acting adviser, will now serve as the National Security Council chief of staff.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another blow to the #NeverTrumpers

- The Washington Times

The Never Trump crowd has an unwavering belief that Donald Trump is unhinged, unfit for the presidency -- an irrational actor who is dangerous on the world stage. Yet he continues to make good, reasonable and rational decisions.

Support the president

President Trump has a lot of opposition from the Democrats, and that was expected. But what wasn't expected is the opposition he is getting from Republicans. He isn't perfect, but is a million times better than Hillary Clinton would have been. He has taken on the Herculean task of straightening out the disaster that the Democrats have created. He can use some help instead of constant criticism from his own party.