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Soldiers listen to U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015. Carter is making his first trip to visit troops and commanders in Afghanistan since his swearing-in this week. (AP Photo/Jonathan Ernst, Pool)

Vanquishing the enemy

As the Islamic State and other militant Islamist groups are attracting young men and women into its ranks, will we honor the primary duty of the federal government?

In this March 3, 2015, photo, President Barack Obama speaks about Iran and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress during a meeting with Defense Secretary Ashton Carter in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The audacity of weakness

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke to Congress on Tuesday to warn Americans of the anti-Western threats from theocratic — and likely to soon be nuclear — Iran.

The Court and the Burwell Obamacare Case Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A prescription for health care after Burwell

On Wednesday, the nine justices of the United States Supreme Court will consider the case of King v. Burwell, concerning the constitutionality of Obamacare, determining the limits of President Obama’s executive power and the ability of the president to rewrite laws on his own while ignoring the constitutional duties of the legislative branch of government.

A Nuclear-Armed Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dubious deal of the century

Remember when President Obama said that to prevent the Islamic Republic of Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapons capability, he would keep all options “on the table”? How long has it been since anyone took that warning seriously?

The Tarheels Step on Themselves Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cleaning up the campus boondoggles

Readers of this column are familiar with my argument that a conservative tide is sweeping the country, contrary to the mainstream media. In the off-year elections of 2010 and 2014, the gains made by conservatives have been substantial in governors’ mansions and in state legislatures. To be sure, they have been substantial in Washington, too, at the House and Senate level, but I would argue that they have been more consequential at the state level. There, old conventions that have been in place since the left-wing 1960s are being heaved out and a clamor of protest is being heard from the evicted. It can only get worse.

** FILE ** An undated photo of Adolf Hitler. (Image: United States Holocaust Museum)

To know offensive ideology is to read it

Anyone who believes in the right to freedom of speech and expression knows it’s a two-way street. You have to consistently defend speech that you fundamentally agree with, as well as speech that you completely oppose.

In this March 20, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu huddle during their joint news conference in Jerusalem, Israel. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The occasion the Democrats asked for

- The Washington Times

The Democrats set out to teach John Boehner and Benjamin Netanyahu a lesson. They would boycott the Israeli prime minister’s speech to Congress and apply enough pressure to cancel the speech, keep Mr. Netanyahu at home and embarrass the Republicans who invited him here. What a happy day’s work that would be.

American Defense if Israel Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Standing with Israel in a dangerous world

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Such an invitation is one of the highest honors we can bestow on a foreign leader. And such a speech is normally an occasion of unity in Washington, when elected officials put partisan politics aside and come together to focus on weighty issues of national security.

Failure to Protect Against Iranian Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Iran goes nuclear

Our attention these days with regard to security is understandably riveted on the Islamic State, or ISIS, and its hideous decapitations, rapes and live immolations. We must deal with the Islamic State, but it is not the gravest threat we face. The Israelis are right — we should awaken to the fact that the coming of a nuclear Iran holds special dangers and requires particularly urgent attention. There are four driving reasons.

Obama Veto of Keystone Pipeline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Keystone XL pipeline veto

Experienced vote counters do not believe that either the House or the Senate will muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill. If so, Mr. Obama’s years of delay and disingenuousness on this issue, culminating in his veto, will guarantee negative consequences for America long into the future.

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Netanyahu right on Iran

House Speaker John Boehner was wise to have Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speak to Congress in order to address the truth about Iran's evil designs to rule the Middle East ("Obama strikes back, scolds Netanyahu for offering 'nothing new,'" Web, March 3). Prime Minister Netanyahu displayed candid courage in the face of being snubbed by President Obama and Mr. Obama's Democratic minions, while Secretary of State John Kerry was busy capitulating to Iran's one-side negotiations.

In this Jan. 23, 2013, file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Something to hide

There's a new chapter in the familiar Clinton dodge, this one written by Hillary. On Monday The New York Times reported that Mrs. Clinton stubbornly refused to use a government email account during her tenure as secretary of state, choosing instead a private account to better hide her emails. This likely violates the U.S. Records Act, and we've seen this kind of Clinton subterfuge before.

Nemtsov Memorial Poster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Nemtsov's murder — the tip of Vladimir Putin's iceberg

The murder of my good friend Boris Nemtsov is a personal tragedy. When we met for lunch in Tel Aviv a few months ago, I warned him not to return to Moscow. Posters and ads denouncing him as a "national traitor" had been plastered all over the city's Novy Arbat Avenue and on the Internet.

Obama Power Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A president gone rogue

Can the president rewrite federal laws? Can he alter their meaning? Can he change their effect? These are legitimate questions in an era in which we have an unpopular progressive Democratic president who has boasted that he can govern without Congress by using his phone and his pen, and a mostly newly elected, largely conservative Republican Congress with its own ideas about big government.

A rendition of a now-scrapped Arlington streetcar line.

No desire for a streetcar

Nearly everybody likes a streetcar, but most of them live only in the memories of old folks. Once upon a time streetcars ran nearly everywhere in nearly every big city in America, and in a lot of not-so-big cities. Two hundred miles of track, for example, tied Washington to its suburbs in Virginia and Maryland.

Failing New York Schools Illustration by Nancy Ohanian

Taylor Swift's poor investment

Pop star Taylor Swift has donated $50,000 to the New York City public school system. Miss Swift, who was named the world's sixth most powerful celebrity by Forbes magazine, has commendably performed numerous acts of charity since moving into her $20 million Tribeca residence last year, including visits with sick children at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Obama's Iranian Nuclear Negotiations Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama ‘fundamentally transforms’ the Middle East

Of his many disgraceful blow-offs of our key allies — returning the bust of Winston Churchill to Great Britain, refusing to march in Paris after the Charlie Hebdo massacre, vetoing the Keystone XL pipeline coming from Canada — President Obama's epic dis of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu this week takes the cake.

Veteran NBC newsman Lester Holt is currently filling in for "Nightly News" anchorman Brian Williams, who has taken leave while questions about his credibility are sorted out by the network. (NBC News)

While Brian Williams waits out suspension, NBC News veteran Lester Holt ups the ratings

- The Washington Times

The substitute has bested the regular. NBC News veteran anchorman Lester Holt has upped the ratings at his network while substituting for Brian Williams, currently waiting out his six-month suspension from the job. Nielsen numbers reveal that Mr. Holt draws 10.1 million viewers each night — a rare milestone, and one that rival networks have not reached in eight seasons, according to AdAge. Mr. Holt has also increased the much coveted 25-54-year-old viewing audience by 6 percent, and NBC now leads CBS ad ABC.

Petraeus got off easy

Gen. David Petraeus' plea deal for giving highly classified information to his mistress shows the shameful double standard that exists today in our legal system ("David Petraeus to plead guilty to removing classified information during affair," Web, March 3).

Netanyahu's Bible lesson from Queen Esther

Benjamin Netanyahu leavened his powerful account of what's really at stake in the nuclear negotiations with Iran with a little history and a little wisdom from the Bible. And why not? The war against the terrorists in the Middle East is a war against evil men peddling a violent perversion of a religion.

How bad housing policies led to the financial crisis

Peter Wallison's important, engaging and alarming "Hidden in Plain Sight" is the definitive work on the financial crisis and a must-read for policymakers, the commentariat and citizens wanting to pierce the populist anti-Wall-Street, anti-bank fog.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks before a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. In a speech that stirred political intrigue in two countries, Netanyahu told Congress that negotiations underway between Iran and the U.S. would "all but guarantee" that Tehran will get nuclear weapons, a step that the world must avoid at all costs. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The Netanyahu speech

Benjamin Netanyahu knocked one out of the park Tuesday, and once it cleared the fence the ball beaned a man lurking in the shadows, and bounced into the tall grass. That man in the shadows looked a lot like President Obama.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Unhappy days in Chicago

Rahm Emanuel was born in Chicago and has been a very favorite son. The Daley machine sent him to Congress, where he was a faithful liege of Bill Clinton, was President Obama's first chief of staff, got rich working his connections to Wall Street, joined the looting of the federal housing program and returned to his hometown to be elected mayor in 2012. Mr. Emanuel once described his job as mayor as the culmination of a lifelong dream, and said, "I'm loving doing this."