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FILE - This April 22, 2014, file photo shows an employment application form on a table during a job fair at Columbia-Greene Community College in Hudson, N.Y. The Labor Department releases its weekly report on applications for unemployment benefits on Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

Who are you calling the party of the rich?

The median American household saw its net worth decline by 36 percent during the Great Recession. That is a hard reality. A Republican held the White House when the crash hit, and voters, in no mood to be charitable, blamed the GOP. Besides, Democrats were ready with an explanation that slid right into an existing groove of American thinking: The financial crisis was caused by Republicans going easy on their big-banker friends.

Illustration on the value of the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Constitution, the great charter of liberty

When July 4 rolls around, there’s no mistaking it. There are fireworks, parades and other patriotic tributes to our Declaration of Independence. If you’re like most Americans, Sept. 17 comes and goes without any fanfare.

Illustration on climate, environmentalism and fuel supply by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Obama’s faulty climate-change solutions

President Obama boasted to the United Nations General Assembly last week that America is working hard to deal with what he called the “one issue that will define the contours of this century more dramatically than any other.”

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flynn, the three-star Army general who has headed the Defense Intelligence Agency for less than two years is being nudged aside amid conflict within the agency and between the general and leaders elsewhere in the intelligence community, a senior defense official said Wednesday, April 30. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

A promise to defend America on the cheap

- The Washington Times

Maybe President Obama is beginning to understand the Islamist threat against America. Maybe. If he does, we’ll owe a debt to the Americans who lost their heads to the barbarians. He still doesn’t understand what he has to do about it.

Illustration on gun control in Colorado by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Colorado’s Second Amendment wildfire

- The Washington Times

Last year, in the wake of the Sandy Hook school shootings in Connecticut, the Obama administration and then-New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg worked to put together a “coalition of the willing” to join them in a war on the Second Amendment and hit upon Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper as a likely recruit.

Pamona High School students Ciana Vrtikapa, left, and Tori Suyak engage with passing motorists in a busy intersection near their school, during a multi-school protest against a Jefferson County School Board proposal to emphasize patriotism and downplay civil unrest in the teaching of U.S. history, in Arvada, Colo., Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. Students from several high schools walked out of class Tuesday in the second straight day of protests in Jefferson County. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

‘A’ Is for agitation

There’s a big battle brewing in the Jefferson County, Colo., school system. The manufactured controversy over a proposed curriculum review is generating national headlines. But the fight is not about what misguided students and biased reporters say it’s about. “Censorship” is a red herring. The real issue is union control.

Illustration on government healthcare encouraging death after 75 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

If the government is paying the bill, it’s best to die young

Much is being made of Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel’s essay in The Atlantic, “Why I Hope to Die at 75,” where he argues that dying at 75 would be best for everyone. He’s entitled to his opinion, of course, but what makes this especially concerning is his role as an architect of the so-called “Affordable Care Act” (Obamacare).

Illustration on threats to West Virginia's coal industry by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

A tale of two West Virginias

Last month, West Virginia state Sen. Brooks McCabe, a Democrat, predicted that “as a leading energy state, West Virginia could create a future unimaginable heretofore.”

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy holds up a pen before signing new emission guidelines during an announcement of a plan to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030, Monday, June 2, 2014, at EPA headquarters in Washington.  In a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming, the Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday that cuts carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third over the next 15 years, but pushes the deadline for some states to comply until long after President Barack Obama leaves office. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

An opportunity to rein in the EPA

In the absence of action by Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken dramatic and unprecedented steps to craft energy policy in this country by issuing new regulations regarding carbon-dioxide emissions.

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