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Illustration on the removal of Chuck Hagel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dumping Hagel at Defense

The abrupt resignation of Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has a few important facts behind it, but it is probably tied to a shift in President Obama’s strategy in Afghanistan.

President Barack Obama, left, reaches over to touch Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, left, following an announcement of Hagel's resignation during an event in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Hagel is stepping down under pressure from Obama's Cabinet, senior administration officials said Monday, following a tenure in which he has struggled to break through the White House's insular foreign policy team. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

What Hagel’s exit means

Chuck Hagel’s decision signified only one thing: Barack Obama no longer enjoys the confidence of the American military establishment.

Congress Wields the Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring regular order on Capitol Hill

So long as they do not overplay their hand, Republicans in the U.S. House and Senate have been given a wonderful opportunity to significantly pare the federal budget and shape U.S. policy in the last two years of the Obama administration.

Illustration on the effects of Obama's illegal alien order on the African American population by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How about putting Americans first?

The framers of the Constitution sought to limit the power of government and expand individual liberty. President Obama sees it the other way. Whether he violated the constitutional limits of his power will be debated and possibly decided in the courts and by the new Republican majority in Congress, but there is another issue surrounding the amnesty order that needs addressing.

Illustration on further Union intrusion on McDonald's and other franchises by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Going overboard at the labor board

Whom do you work for? Such a simple question should not require a government agency to give an answer. However, the Obama administration, in its never-ending quest for power over individuals and businesses, has decided that it — rather than you or your employer — should determine whom you work for.

Apollo 11 begins the return trip to earth. Source: NASA

Getting on with getting to Mars

Forty-five years ago last summer, Neil Armstrong and I walked on the moon. Our Apollo 11 lander touched down in the moon’s “Sea of Tranquility,” and three days later we were home.

House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dreaded consequences of Obamanomics

What has been the price tag for the audacious Obamanomics experiment? How much has it all cost — the bailouts, the debt, the stimulus plans, the printing of cheap money, Obamacare and all the rest?

(AP Photo/Isaac Brekken, File)

Obama’s immigration order regresses America

As President Obama with a single order created what he hopes will be an eventual new electorate via millions of illegal aliens, he did not break new ground; he put America on very old and dangerous ground: government by decree.

Liberal Bully of the Week: Emperor Obama

To quote the band Styx from the classic 1977 song “Come Sail Away”: “I tried Oh Lord I tried to carry on …” to not give the “Bully Award” to Barack Obama once again. However, I had no choice. President Obama has taken bullying to a whole new level not seen since maybe Hugo Chavez (another liberal darling).

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Illustration on Middle East violence by Julius/Horsens Folkeblad, Horsens, Denmark

Slaughter in the synagogue

Executioners for the Islamic State use knives to cut the throats of Christians, Yazidis and "apostate" Muslims. Palestinian executioners last week used knives and a meat cleaver to slaughter Jewish worshippers at a synagogue in West Jerusalem.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer, New York Democrat. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Chuck Schumer's advice to Democrats: To win in 2016, embrace big government

- The Washington Times

As policy director for the Democratic Party, Sen. Charles Schumer promised to diagnose what went wrong for Democrats in the midterm elections. On Tuesday morning, he explained all at the National Press Club. The New York lawmaker said voters blamed the Democratic Party for a string of monumental government failures. But that's no excuse to give up on government, he cautioned - and an all-embracing government is the key to a 2016 White House win.

A 40-pound tom turkey looks out at Raymond's Turkey Farm in Methuen, Mass., Friday, Nov. 21, 2014. The farm raises approximately 20,000 Broad Breasted White Holland turkeys per year. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

PETA to White House: You protect the rights of women - why not turkeys?

- The Washington Times

The People for Ethical Treatment of Animals tried their best, but the White House turkey pardoning will go on as scheduled in Wednesday in the Rose Garden before a bank of cameras, journalists, amused officials and cautious turkey handlers. The activist group previously reached out to First Daughters Malia and Sasha, pleading with them to become vegans and intercede on behalf of the pair of turkeys, who hail from Ohio. The group considers the ceremony offensive, and a promotion for poultry breeders.

Do Americans still agree with "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses," as engraved on the Statue of Liberty? (National park Service)

Poll: Americans not so keen on verse 'Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses'

- The Washington Times

Many Americans recall the verse "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free" inscribed on the base of the Statue of Library, and written by poet Emma Lazarus in "A New Colossus," her poem of 1883. Eight-out-of-10 Americans say these sentiments applied in the past, notes a YouGov poll released Monday. Do we still believe these words today? Well, not particularly.

EDITORIAL: The pigs find a loophole

"Earmarks," small, large and enormous pots of taxpayers' money that congressmen give themselves to fund pet projects in their districts, usually in return for votes, are a lot like Count Dracula. They won't stay dead. But last week the Republicans in the House put down an attempt by one of their own to resurrect them.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the media after the closed-door nuclear talks with Iran, in Vienna, Austria, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Facing still significant differences between the U.S. and Iran, negotiators gave up on last-minute efforts to get a nuclear deal by the Monday deadline and extended their talks for another seven months. The move gives both sides breathing space to work out an agreement but may be badly received by domestic sceptics, since it extends more than a decade of diplomatic efforts to curb Iran's nuclear prowess. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

EDITORIAL: Iran stalls again

The lot of a diplomat is not always a happy one. Life in striped pants can be challenging. So much Chablis and brie, so little time. It's not all polite chatter. In the matter of the crucial talks over the future of Iran's nuclear program, all the pushing and pulling of policy, all the huffing and puffing of inflamed egos, will probably be for naught. Sooner or later, unless the Israelis rescue the West from fear and indecision, Iran will have its Islamic bomb.

In this undated photo provided by Anheuser-Busch, Lt. Chuck Nadd and his girlfriend Shannon Cantwell wave as they ride aboard the famously-red Budweiser beer wagon pulled by Clydesdales in a parade, led by a marching band in Winter Park, Fla. The brewer has fashioned an ad around the parade that will run during the Super Bowl.(AP Photo/Anheuser-Busch, Hand Out)

Just say whoa: Budweiser ditching beloved Clydesdales in their advertising

- The Washington Times

It is a cultural moment in advertising: Budweiser is unhitching the iconic team of Clydesdale horses which has appeared in their commercials for 27 years, charming a global audience and creating herds of fans. But no more. The beer maker is now alarmed by falling sales and huge competition from craft beers - and is intent on retooling its image for a younger crowd.