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Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, wearing an army uniform, ride on an armed truck to patrol the international airport in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 28, 2015. Yemen's President Abed Raboo Mansour Hadi, speaking at an Arab summit in Egypt on Saturday, called Shiite rebels who forced him to flee the country "puppets of Iran," directly blaming the Islamic Republic for the chaos there and demanding airstrikes against rebel positions continue until they surrender. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Why Yemen matters

Thoughts on the shifting dynamics in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama’s love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That’s good enough for me. He says he’s a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that’s good enough for God it’s good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they’re working on it).

Obamacare in a death spiral illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obamacare flying machine begins a death spiral

The Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, the case challenging the Obama administration’s decision to award tax credits for health insurance sold through federally established exchanges, could turn on the question of whether a ruling that ends the tax credits on federal exchanges might cause something known as a “death spiral” in health insurance markets.

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz’s announcement this week that he’s running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the “1 percent.” While it’s still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it’s assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee’s platform.

Illustration on the lack of U.S abortion data by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unhealthy state of abortion statistics

Abortion advocates in Congress and in state legislatures claim that abortions are “safe.” Yet numerous, long-standing problems at the state and federal level illustrate that the abortion data collection and reporting system in the United States is haphazard and dysfunctional, making assertions about “abortion safety” unreliable.

Illustration on the Cotton letter's impact on nuclear talks with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tom Cotton, tragic hero

The snarky quip attributed to 19th-century French Foreign Minister Charles Maurice de Talleyrand — “It was worse than a crime; it was a blunder” — has recently been making the rounds to deride a letter written by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and signed by 46 other senators.

Illustration on entering the presidential race by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The learning curve of a candidate

As we stand about 20 months out from Election Day 2016, I have much to learn in terms of becoming both a better candidate and a better potential president of the United States. I do not take the opportunity lightly.

Illustration on the value of the U.S. satellite system by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Launching the crown jewels

If America didn’t have hundreds of satellites in orbit, our Air Force, Navy and Army — as well as our intelligence agencies — wouldn’t be deaf, dumb and blind. But they’d come close. Our aircraft, ships and submarines are designed to depend on satellites for their high-technology capabilities.

Cherry-picking statistics illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Missing the mark on climate change skepticism

During the past few weeks, a series of articles in the press have implied that Willie Soon, a well-known global-warming skeptic, had violated ethical standards by failing to disclose information about research funding.

Rainbow flag. (Wikipedia)

Panic inside the lavender bubble

- The Washington Times

Life can be good inside a bubble, where the sun always shines, life is a bowl of cherries and it comes with whipped cream and no calories. You could ask almost anyone in San Francisco, where the only disappointment inside the lavender bubble is among the gay caballeros who don’t get to carry the six-foot papier-mache penis to lead the annual Gay Pride Parade.

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(Associated Press Photo)

'Termite menace': Hybrid swarm of destructive species set to invade Florida

- The Washington Times

It's not hurricanes and high water that is threatening Florida. It's termites. Two of the most destructive species of the termite kingdom are now swarming simultaneously in South Florida - and scientists are worried. The Asian and Formosan subterranean termite clans are about to meet, mate and produce an unprecedented number of feisty hybrid offspring - hundreds of thousands of alates, or winged males and females.

Corizon can serve DC jail well

Your recent article, "DC Jail medical contract sparks city council criticism" (Web, March 18), may leave readers with a faulty impression of our company and what's at stake in the pending D.C. City Council vote to approve our award.

President Barack Obama waves from Air Force One upon his arrival at Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport, Thursday, March 26, 2015, in Birmingham, Ala. The president will speak at Lawson State Community College, about the economy.  (AP Photo/ Hal Yeager)

A late education on the left

Liberals and conservatives don't often come together on important issues because they commute from different planets. Pundits of various stripe bemoan the lack of common values and ponder why Democrats, Republicans, conservatives and liberals seem to have lost respect not only for each other's views, but for each other.

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2015 file photo, Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate will begin consideration of Lynch's nomination to be attorney general next week. Democrats have been pressing for the Senate to act on President Barack Obama's selection of Lynch, who is the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

The Lynch nomination

The longer the United States Senate puts off the vote on her confirmation the less likely Loretta Lynch will become the attorney general. Some Democrats, in particular Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, have played the usual race card but so far none of the groups that specialize in expressions of outrage have said much, if anything.

Celebrate global warmth

Just 13,000 years ago Earth was in the grip of a deathly ice age. Sea levels were indeed much lower than they are now, but much of the land surface was covered by thick sheets of ice. Life struggled to survive and many species were extinguished by the sterile, suffocating ice.

Finding a killer driven by ‘nuclear rage’

The investigating team of Alex Delaware and Milo Sturgis is coping with unsolved "cold cases" and an ice-cold killer in this crafty and cleverly plotted mystery.

Bongino for Senate

I know it is still early, but so far only Maryland Democratic representatives Chris Van Hollen, District 8, and Donna Edwards, District 4, have announced plans to run for retiring Sen. Barbara Mikulski's open Senate seat. This does not give Maryland voters any good choices or hope for making things better in Maryland.

GOP must be the anti-Obama

President Obama's policies have failed, he ignores the Constitution and has the Department of Justice ensure that his will becomes de facto law. He will allow Iran to produce nuclear weapons and is willing to abandon Israel. Knowing that, it would be important not to have another Obama-like Democratic president in 2017, one who would complete the transformation of the United States into a government in total control of all aspects of citizens' lives.

Looks can be deceiving

It doesn't surprise me that millionaire Robert Durst has been linked to the 1971 disappearance of a female Vermont college student and is the prime suspect in the murders of a neighbor and friend and in the disappearance and likely murder of his wife, Kathleen Durst ("Robert Durst, Houston millionaire, returning to court in New Orleans," Web, March 23).

Illustration on Hillary Clinton, Sidney Blumenthal and Tyler Drumheller's secret foreign policy operations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Another murky mystery surrounding Hillary’s private email

The Benghazi Select Committee, chaired by Rep. Trey Gowdy, has formally requested that Hillary Clinton turn over the private server she used to keep under her control all of her communications while secretary of state. That assumes that the server hasn't been reduced to subatomic particles by now.

Former President Bill Clinton hugs his daughter, Chelsea Clinton, during the closing session of the Clinton Global Initiative in New York Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. At right is Chelsea's husband, Marc Mezvinsky. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Cash for clunkers

Successful politicians know how to avoid a conflict of interest. Unsuccessful politicians can't recognize one when they see one, or if they do, figure they can duck when sticks, stones and subpoenas fly. Then there are the Clintons. Bubba wrote the book on how to duck and weave. Hillary is learning, with difficulty. She doesn't have the good ol' boy's wink and smile.

Celebrating family love and national pride

For those of us who thrilled to the movie made of Rodgers and Hammerstein's last Broadway collaboration, "The Sound of Music," it is hard to believe that a half-century has passed since it claimed its unique place in American film.