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Illustration on adjusting Section 215 of the Patriot Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Amending the Patriot Act, not ending it

The Senate, which will never be known for an overly demanding work schedule, returns from its week-long recess a whole day early to deal with the mess being made of one of our most important anti-terrorist intelligence programs. That program, now encompassed by Section 215 of the unfortunately named Patriot Act, has its roots in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA.

Positive Messages Hit the Mark Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatism, the Chevy of American leadership

Imagine General Motors trying to sell you a Chevy truck by airing an ad featuring a Ford F-150 pickup truck bursting into flames, killing a family of four and ending with anguished relatives waiting for news of their loved ones in a hospital emergency room.

Illistration on adjusting Export-Import bank policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Reaganesque solution to the Ex-Im Bank dilemma

Opposition to the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) is now at the point where the bank’s reauthorization is genuinely in doubt. Spurred by accusations of corporate welfare, crony capitalism and outright corruption, opponents believe the Ex-Im Bank’s palpable violation of free-market principles fully warrants its early demise.

This undated colorized transmission electron micrograph image made available by the CDC shows an Ebola virus virion. For the first time, Ebola has been discovered inside the eyes of a patient months after the virus was gone from his blood, according to a report published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, May 7, 2015. (Frederick Murphy/CDC via AP)

A little good news about Ebola

- The Washington Times

The news from Africa and the Third World is seldom good, and much of the bad news is about disease born of ignorance, superstition and primitive sanitation, news dispatched by a media addicted to tales of unrelieved gloom, certain doom and inevitable disaster.

Unions Helped by Obama Appointees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping workers in the dark

Two of Sen. Harry Reid’s controversial legislative maneuvers are coming back to haunt American workers. In 2013, then-Majority Leader Reid’s threat to eviscerate the judicial filibuster cowed enough Senate Republicans to approve Big Labor’s handpicked candidates to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). A few months later, Mr. Reid acted on his threat to gut the filibuster and installed three of President Obama’s nominees on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Missing world leader by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the JV team of world leaders

British Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent stunning victory for his Conservative party catapulted him to one of the three top Western world leaders, alongside Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Francois Hollande. Mr. Cameron wasn’t supposed to win for numerous reasons, not the least of which because of his austerity policies and vigorous opposition from Labor and Liberal parties that thought a bigger government was the key to Britain’s growth.

Illustration on missing Muldovan bank funds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Who took Moldova’s millions — the crooks or the Kremlin?

On the eve of a national election in tiny Moldova last November, $450 million — equal to 10 percent of the Eastern European country’s entire annual gross domestic product — went missing. So far, no one knows where it went.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Chamber of Corporate Welfare

Here’s a half-serious question: How much do taxpayers have to pay off Boeing to make the Export-Import Bank — finally and irrevocably — go away? If the feds wrote a check to Boeing for $100 million, would they then let the Ex-Im Bank die a merciful and long overdue death?

Illustration on the abuse of citizens' rights under current government surveillance laws by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A better Patriot Act

Critical parts of the USA Patriot Act are about to expire. The reauthorization bill moving through Congress, the USA Freedom Act, has sparked controversy on both sides of the political aisle and within the civil-libertarian community, rekindling debates that began more than a decade ago. Now is the chance to implement much-needed reforms, including reforms to a provision not expiring: the one authorizing National Security Letters (NSL).

Paying heed to the walking wounded

A few days ago I received a thank you note from an American soldier who has been struggling with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As with many victims of TBI and PTSD, it had taken him a while to realize the true nature of his injury and to seek professional help.

White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the “a,” the “and,” and the “the.” Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants’ connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

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Ferreting out the fakers

Fairly or not, polygraph examiners for the Central Intelligence Agency and other institutions that require security clearances for staff are not necessarily the most popular guys in the coffee shop. And for good reason: much of their professional lives are devoted to ferreting out secrets their subjects would prefer to leave untold.

Illustration on alternatives to inner-city public schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An escape route from inner-city schools

Before he passed away recently, John M. Templeton, the distinguished physician and philanthropist, questioned: "Should we tolerate a public educational system with its entrenched self-interest which virtually every inner-city parent knows is destroying any hope or possibility of their children achieving meaningful opportunity in a 21st century economy?" A growing number of parents say no.

Illustration on the anti-semitism of the BDS movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Resisting the longest hatred

Robert S. Wistrich, who died suddenly last week, was considered the foremost scholar of anti-Semitism, which he called "the longest hatred," one that appears to be metastasizing in the current era.

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2013 file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the State Department in Washington. On Friday, the State Department posted 296 Benghazi-related emails from Hillary Clinton's private server.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Let's see the server

There's a media consensus that there's no "smoking gun" in the emails that Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of State and presidential candidate, has "persuaded" the department she presided over for so long to release to the public.

In this May 24, 2015 photo, police pick up a pair of shoes after a double shooting in Baltimore. Baltimore city police said dozens of people have been shot and at least eight killed in a series of separate weekend shootings. The Baltimore Sun reported that 35 people have been killed so far in May, making it the deadliest month in Baltimore since December 1999. (Colin Campbell/The Baltimore Sun via AP)

Collateral damage in the ghetto

The morgue in Baltimore is getting crowded. The riots that convulsed the city last month have subsided, and the fusillade of rocks and bricks and the burning of cars and shops has been replaced by a more frightening violence -- murder in wholesale lot.

Don't transform America; perfect it

President Obama and others who think like him want to "fundamentally transform" the United States. Yet in order to become successful, many of these people took advantage of opportunities provided them by the United States — before any transformation had taken place.

Christians not leaving Israel

Reading "Pope Francis canonizes first modern Palestinian saints in heavily symbolic move" (Web, May 17) an unsuspecting reader might think that Christian Arabs are persecuted in all of Israel, not just in the West Bank and Gaza. The same reader might also get the impression that Christian Arabs are leaving Israel. Neither of these is true.

Bringing historical insights to the bar

Perhaps it's something in the water: The National Archives has an ongoing exhibit, "Spirited Republic," celebrating America's love affair with drink. And last week this newspaper reported skullduggery in Kentucky where whiskey has been burgled by the barrel and one brand of local hooch fetches $2,000 a bottle. Now comes a book to champion bourbon alone. Perhaps we're getting over the hangover of Prohibition, and it's OK to enjoy drinking again, "responsibly," of course.

Farcical Obama Speech Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's hot-air commencement address

I didn't attend my commencement ceremony at American University in Washington, D.C. I chose instead to receive my degree in the mail. I didn't want to listen to a boring speaker, likely unaffiliated with the school or anyone in it, drone on in Washington's notorious summer heat.

FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2014 file photo, the HealthCare.gov website, where people can buy health insurance, on a laptop screen, is seen in Portland, Ore. If the latest health overhaul case before the Supreme Court gets decided the way most Republicans want, it could have a politically painful unintended consequence for GOP lawmakers.   (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

Paying the devil in the details

Obamacare seems about to implode, and the implosion could be a great contribution to those who would reform America's health system in a systematic way. The nation will have to get it right the second time around.