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President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. With Trump are Michelle DeLaune, center, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and Dina Powell, right, White House Senior Counselor for Economic Initiatives. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumpspeak, a language rich in adjectives

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump isn’t the carrier of the disease that threatens the language, but he suffers with enthusiasm. His abuse of the adjective might eventually threaten his foreign policy.

Illustration on immigration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘I am an immigrant’

I have a Masters in International Relations, speak four languages and served as a politician in my country, the Republic of Georgia. I am also an immigrant.

Playing the xenophobic card

- The Washington Times

Last week, The New York Times detailed President Donald Trump’s press conference, and wrote: “A Jewish reporter got to ask Trump a question, it didn’t go well.”

The Genesis of Despicable Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being a ‘deplorable’

Who among us can’t at some point relate to what it feels like to be an “irredeemable deplorable,” a term coined in the heat of a campaign but with far greater implications now. Whether we are religious or not, whether we pray or not, whether we are political activists or not, many of us know what it feels like to be mocked to the point of less than “other” status.

Illustration of Ajit Pai by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A new champion for internet choice

One of President Trump’s less publicized appointments also happens to be one of his best: Ajit Pai as the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is a cause for celebration.

Illustration on the 9th Circuit court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reining in a hysterical judiciary

On Feb. 9, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit issued a ruling upholding the temporary restraining order against enforcement of President Trump’s Executive Order 13769.

Illustration on the complexities of dealing with illegal immigration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The labyrinth of illegal immigration

Activists portray illegal immigration solely as a human story of the desperately poor from south of the border fleeing misery to start new, productive lives in the United States — despite exploitation and America’s nativist immigration laws.

Black Leadership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Enlightened, inspired black leadership

After having been assigned to the United States Military Academy at West Point, one becomes acutely aware of the critical role leadership plays in solving challenging social problems. As an African-American, with that experience, I cannot not but consider the role black leadership plays in addressing African-American issues.

Illustration on domestic spying by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The spooks have come home to roost

Last week, The Wall Street Journal revealed that members of the intelligence community — part of the deep state, the unseen government within the government that does not change with elections — now have acquired so much data on everyone in America that they can selectively reveal it to reward their friends and harm their foes. Their principal foe today is the president of the United States.

The Annual Academy Liberal Awards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How not to embarrass Oscar

When you give your acceptance speeches, thank your publicist, limo driver, manicurist, masseuse, day nanny, night nanny and weekend nanny. Your attorney Marty Singer for killing that salacious National Enquirer story.

Illustration on the need to clean house at U.S. intelligence agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rousting the anti-Flynn cabal

In the anti-Trump media war, it is nearly impossible to keep the names straight without a scorecard. Barely had Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn’s name faded from the news cycle than he was replaced by H.R. McMaster, another lieutenant general most Americans have never heard of. Will this latest general be any more fortunate than his predecessor? Only if he can overcome the frenzied machinations of the Obama deep state.

President Donald Trump, right, speaks as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, listens at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The downside of a Trump tariff

When word got out in January 1848 that gold had been discovered at Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California, near Sacramento, it triggered the famous California Gold Rush, which in a few short years brought some 300,000 fortune seekers to the territory, whose population at the time was just 155,000, most of them Native Americans.

Attack on the Earth by the Evil Empire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Time’s misreading of science

As demonstrated by the confirmation hearings of Scott Pruitt for new Environmental Protection Agency chief, all-out war is being waged against the Trump administration by leftists who believe science is under attack from the evil empire.

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The torment of Pasternak's true muse

Sometimes when you read a novel, you just know that the love story at its heart has to be based on a real relationship. This takes nothing away from the author's craft: it's simply that the fabric he has woven is redolent of someone who has actually loved and been loved. The Russian novelist Boris Pasternak's magnum opus "Doctor Zhivago" -- which won him the Nobel Prize the Soviet authorities would not allow him to accept -- is a prime example of this phenomenon. The object of its eponymous hero's passion, Lara, seems so obviously the reflection of a great love affair.

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, right, accompanied by White House strategist Stephen Bannon, speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Oxon Hill, Md., Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Conservatives more united than mainstream media reports

Conservatives acknowledge that President Trump is not a purist, and establishment conservatives have criticized him on issues such as infrastructure spending and trade. But even the conservative establishment can agree that Mr. Trump is making a concerted effort to keep his campaign promises.

Keep promises of repeal

We were well-informed in 2009 of the disastrous impact Obamacare would have on the American public. Now, with the Republicans in control of the House, Senate and White House (and a more positive influence in the Supreme Court), we have a chance to fix this situation.

What about Clintons' anti-Semitism?

There is a certain hypocrisy in Rep. Jerry Nadler and other Democrats calling upon President Trump to condemn anti-Semitism. Many of these same people failed to condemn the Rev. Jesse Jackson for his infamous remarks about Jews in 1984, as well as comments that have been made by other Democrats. These of course include Hillary Clinton, who was seen and heard screaming an anti-Semitic epithet at her husband's campaign manager following Bill Clinton's 1974 lost congressional-seat bid in Arkansas.

Protesters hold signs during a rally in support of transgender youth, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, at the Stonewall National Monument in New York. They were demonstrating against President Donald Trump's decision to roll back a federal rule saying public schools had to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their chosen gender identity. The rule had already been blocked from enforcement, but transgender advocates view the Trump administration action as a step back for transgender rights. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Free-for-all at the urinal

A visitor from Mars or Pluto could reasonably conclude that Earth is a weird planet indeed. "It's a heavenly body of great beauty," he might report back to headquarters, "where everyone is trying to change his and her sex but is so squeamish about talking about sex that they must coin euphemisms, such as 'gender identity,' to describe it."

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017,in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The comeback of coal

President Trump's boisterous press conferences sometimes cast a shadow over one of his most important achievements so far: his executive order suspending runaway Environmental Protection Agency rules that all but bankrupted the American coal industry. Three of America's largest coal companies declared Chapter 11 in recent years largely as a result of rules like the Clean Power Plant Act, a gift of Barack Obama.

Will Trump win the war with the deep state? (sponsored)

Will Trump win the war with the deep state?

The resignation by General Michael Flynn as National Security Advisor to President Trump on February 13 was immediately followed by a feeding frenzy of the sharks in the anti-Trump camp.

Vice President Mike Pence spoke with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg in Brussels this week. (Associated Press)

Trying to talk culturally suicidal Europe off the ledge

Europeans are acting as if they have a real attraction to suicide, as a culture and as a group of sovereign states. I watched and read several things this week that made me want to write on this subject. All of the incidents fall into a long-term pattern of self-hating groupthink and self-destruction.

U.S. Rep. Tom Emmer answers a question near the end of a town hall meeting in Sartell, Minn., Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. Emmer's town hall went on as planned after the congressman said he would shut down the event if protests or unruly attendees disrupted the conversation. (Dave Schwarz/St. Cloud Times via AP)

The art of listening: Congress could learn a thing or two from Trump

Have you noticed that members of Congress are keen listeners? They love to listen to each other, and they love listening to the voices in the echo chamber. And, of course, they love to listen to the sound of their own voices. But when it comes to listening to their constituents, Congress could learn a thing or two from President Trump.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, left, and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull share a laugh during the signing of agreements between the two countries at the Commonwealth Parliamentary offices in Sydney, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Netanyahu is on a four-day visit to Australia, the first official visit by an Israeli prime minister. (Dean Lewins/Pool via AP)

The first step toward a safer world

I will never forget the time Menachem Begin, a Nobel Peace laureate and Israel's prime minister from 1977 to 1983, took me into his office and showed me a strategic plan he was to present to the president of the United States.