Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the truth about gun control by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Why gun control is a loser for the Democrats

There is nothing so comforting as a closely held prejudice, even when it repeatedly harms you. The white-hot passion of Democratic politicians to restrict and even strip Americans of their constitutionally guaranteed right to buy, own, keep, shoot and carry firearms continues as a monument to self-abuse.

U.N. Policies on Global Warming Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The politics behind the anti-fossil fuels campaign

History shows Earth’s climate goes through cycles, long and short, tied to a variety of natural factors. In the latter part of the 20th century, some scientists began to wonder about the causes of a modest warming, then cooling, then warming, which had been occurring since the mid-1800s. They also began to worry about the possible implications of continued warming.

After a speech at the Illinois State Capitol, President Barack Obama stops at the Hoogland Center for the Arts in Springfield, Ill.(Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Obama is no incompetent

While he was mocked for his performance in the last debate and had a disappointing showing in New Hampshire, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said what none of his rivals are willing to admit: “Let’s dispel [sic] with the fiction that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing. He knows exactly what he’s doing. He is trying to change this country” — with astonishing success.

Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Illustration on the relationship between Hillary Clinton and Goldman Sachs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pinned to Wall Street

When Goldman Sachs, the powerful, multibillion-dollar Wall Street investment bank, offered Hillary Clinton $675,000 for three speeches, she readily accepted.

Spiro Agnew Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Spiro Agnew shaped Republican rhetoric

Spiro Agnew today is what he characterized himself as in 1968. Richard Nixon tapped the unknown governor of Maryland to be his Republican vice presidential running mate: “not exactly a household word.”

Duplicitous attacks on the Maldives

It is a compelling tale. A longtime political activist leads his party to victory in a closely fought election in a country famed for its pristine archipelagos and on the front of the war against climate change. There is no doubt that Mohamed Nasheed, the former president of the Maldives, was adept at using the international media to promote his agenda while in government.

A student teacher in the second-grade classroom of teacher Susanne Diaz at Marcus Whitman Elementary School, goes over lessons with students, in Richland, Wash. (Ty Beaver/The Tri-City Herald via AP)

Let no child be left unconfused

- The Washington Times

Mae West, the famous philosopher of the boudoir, would hardly believe her fortune today. “So many men,” she once complained, “so little time.” She was the kind of girl who set out to “climb the ladder of success, wrong by wrong.”

Illustrations on Christians and Yazidis in Syria and Iraq by Lians Garsys/The Washington Times

Forsaken for their faith

It’s now a couple of weeks of news cycles since we learned from satellite imagery that the Islamic State had destroyed the monastery of St. Elijah, which for more than 11 centuries served as a spiritual oasis for the promulgation of Christianity in the Middle East.

Cost of Ethanol on the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Renewable Fuel Standard deceit

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants Americans to pay more for their groceries. That’s the only way to explain the agency’s decision to mandate the use of corn-based ethanol in our gas supply.

Related Articles

Swiss researchers have developed a rescue drone capable of navigating rough terrain and forest trails through artificial intelligence and unique software. (Credit UZH;USI;SUPSI)

Researchers develop rough terrain rescue drone that navigates forest trails better than a human

- The Washington Times

It could prove a boon to the thousands of hikers and climbers who become lost or injured on some remote forest trail. Meticulous Swiss researchers have developed a rescue drone which can autonomously recognize and follow the passageways through the undergrowth and rough terrain, using sophisticated artificial intelligence. They ultimately envision an entire fleet of the rescue drones "able to swarm forests in search of missing people" - working right alongside their human counterparts.

Illustration on Hillary's problems with feminism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The hydra-headed monster stalking Hillary

Feminism is the hydra-headed monster stalking Hillary Clinton's campaign for president. She once thought her appeal to women, as the first of her "gender" to get a real crack at the presidency, was straightforward, unambiguous and unstoppable, but now she can't hear the cheers for the cacophony of squabbling female voices.

Candidates, answer Obama question

This nation is in serious trouble, both domestically and internationally. We have open borders, illegal immigration, a looming financial crisis with a national debt nearing $20 trillion and unfunded governmental obligations totaling more than $100 trillion. We also have growing welfare programs and a level of polarization never seen before in this country.

Women in combat unconscionable

I am the father of three women and the grandfather of three girls. I am also a retired Army officer who graduated from West Point and has seen combat. Therefore, when I heard that the Army chief of staff and the commandant of the Marine Corps had called for women to be subject to selective service, I became apoplectic.

FILE - This May 13, 2015, file photo, shows Google's new self-driving car during a demonstration at the Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. The federal government's highway safety agency agrees with Google: Computers that will control the cars of the future can be considered their driver. The redefinition of "driver" is an important break for Google. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar, File)

Self-driven cars are on the way

Machines with a mind of their own are the future, and self-driving automobiles will soon be sharing the road with cars and trucks with real drivers. Labor-saving devices are always welcome, and driving on roads in the congested communities where most Americans live is certainly a chore.

President Barack Obama delivers remarks to the Illinois General Assembly Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, inside the House chamber at the Illinois Capitol in Springfield, Ill. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Obama's slick oil tax

When every problem looks like a shortage of cash, every solution looks like a tax. President Obama sees a $10 surcharge on every barrel of oil the nation consumes as the key to fixing America's transportation system. The dramatic decline in global oil prices has put money back into the pockets of Americans, and predictably, the president intends to seize what he imagines is his "fair share."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Fools, Frauds and Firebrands: Thinkers of the New Left'

In 1985, Roger Scruton published a book titled "Thinkers of the New Left," a collection of articles coming out at "the height of Margaret Thatcher's reign of terror," and "greeted with derision and outrage" by the nearly monolithic leftist British intellectual establishment, with "reviewers falling over each other for the chance to spit on the corpse."

Illustration on the repudiation of the GOP establishment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump, Ted Cruz and the GOP revolt

- The Washington Times

New Hampshire has a way of dishing out political reversals of fortune, and this week proved the Granite State hasn't lost its touch. This time, however, it was the Republican establishment that incurred its wrath. The voters are in open revolt.

Illustration on the real agenda of both parties by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Many candidates, but no choices

What if all the remaining presidential candidates really want the same things? What if they all offer essentially the same ideas couched in different words? What if these primary races have become beauty pageants largely based on personality and advertising?