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Tim Kaine   Associated Press photo

A sad tale of two disposable veeps

- The Washington Times

A governor is always a good choice for a vice president. He (or she) has learned how to run an administration, how to work with a cranky legislature, and understands staying close to the people who elected him. There’s no Praetorian guard to keep him separated from the people.

Illustration on the history of the Democratic Party convention by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unconventional Democrats

It’s Democratic convention time, and while this year’s shindig may not be anything to write home about, the confabs in the old days were knock-down, drag-out affairs. For example, it took nine ballots to nominate James K. Polk in 1844; 49 for Franklin Pierce in 1852, 17 for James Buchanan in 1856, and 22 for Horatio Seymour in 1868.

Illustration on leveraging U.S. visas against China's territorial aggression in the South China Sea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Reversing China’s South China Sea grab

The South China Sea (SCS) is currently the focus of a dispute between the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei. The PRC has preemptively deployed military personnel and equipment to enforce their claims to a trumped-up, self-identified but unrecognized “nine-dash line,” an imagined boundary that is inconsistent with international law and commonly accepted international behavior.

Illustration on all terrain powered wheelchairs for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wheelchairs for veterans

Many Americans are familiar with the military creed of never leaving a fallen comrade behind, a commitment that has served as the real-life inspiration for Hollywood movies chronicling daring rescue operations under impossible odds of injured or captured service members.

In-Activist Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to defeat activists

This month, Congress passed a bill requiring all genetically improved foods to be labeled. But it’s essentially meaningless. Genetically improved foods are just as safe as the veggies in a backyard garden, and virtually all foods — organic or not — have been genetically improved at some point in their history.

Illustration on the stagnation of the Democrat party by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The late, great Democratic Party

This week the Democrats officially coronate the battered Hillary Clinton as the torch bearer for the party. She has slouched to the finish line. She is tired and the country is tired of her. Sorry, Democrats, no do-overs. You’re stuck with her.

EPA Smog Test on Humans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The EPA’s secret whitewash

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is trying to use the prestigious National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to cover-up the agency’s illegal science experiments on humans.

No Troops to Poland Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama must not send troops to Poland

This month, the Obama administration announced it would send 1,000 troops to Poland on a regular rotation as part of ongoing efforts to shore up the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO’s) Eastern flank. These American troops, said President Obama, will “serve shoulder to shoulder with Polish soldiers” to help out one of our country’s “most committed and important allies.”

Sheldon Adelson. (Associated Press)

Now it’s time to pay for the fun

- The Washington Times

Money is not the mother’s milk of politics, as the bundler’s cliche goes, but homemade vanilla ice cream, rich and creamy. Donald Trump hasn’t been getting any. Not much and not lately, anyway.

Saudi Handgun Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of Saudi support for terrorism

Last Friday, the infamous “28 pages” from the 2002 Congressional Joint Inquiry into the 9/11 attacks were declassified. For years, this final section of the report was kept from the public, which led some to believe that it contained evidence that the Saudi Arabian government was behind the attacks, either indirectly by financing al Qaeda or directly by providing support to the actual terrorists on the planes.

Illustration of Ted Cruz as Brutus by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz writes a political suicide note

- The Washington Times

Cleveland — As Charles Krauthammer put it, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wrote “the longest suicide note in U.S. History,” and it was a disjointed, contradictory one that revealed a deeply conflicted and narcissistic man. A principled stand for the party and country? Hardly.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a press conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the Foreign Office in London, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

The nightmarish results of Muslim outreach

When President Obama entered office, he dreamed that his hope-and-change messaging and his references to his familial Islamic roots would win over the Muslim world. The soon-to-be Nobel Peace Prize laureate would make the United States liked in the Middle East. Then terrorism would decrease.

Iran Missile Factory Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Iran delusions

July 14 was the first anniversary of President Obama’s nuclear agreement with Iran. Because the agreement renders our intelligence community deaf and blind to Iran’s nuclear weapons program, the new report from a German intelligence agency that Iran is violating the deal comes as no surprise.

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Illustration on the bus tax by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A regulatory plague from Austin

All plagues, whether they are biological or destructive policy ideas, begin at some specific place and time. The city of Austin, Texas, is now the place of origin of what could be a very costly experiment.

Trump on TV Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's acceptance speech

Donald Trump's acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention was too long -- 75 minutes -- and too loud. Modulation is the key to good public speaking. One's voice should rise and fall like the tide, which allows really important points to be made whether the volume is low or high. His adult children are better speakers.

The office of New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman told Reuters that it routinely seeks input from outside organizations but pursues cases based only on the merits. (Associated Press)

Challenging the climate change bullies

A few months ago, news broke of an astounding assault on free speech. No, the media didn't present it that way, but that's how some conservatives, myself included, characterized it. And with good reason.

U.S. indeed less safe now

When you look at the statistics of the past 10 years, crime has been trending downward. Even with the increase in crime in the largely Democratic inner cities such as Chicago, Baltimore and Washington, the overall national trend of major crimes in America has been down until this year.

An anti-Hillary Clinton demonstrator stands with a sign in downtown Philadelphia, Monday, July 25, 2016, on the first day of the Democratic National Convention. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Brotherly love in Philadelphia

The Democrats, like a pig stuck in a barbed wire fence, have a lot to cry about. Their nominee got the telephone call from the governor (or in this case the FBI) with the hoped-for stay of execution, their national convention just barely escaped implosion, but the landslide victory they expected only a month ago doesn't look like that any longer.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during a meeting with World Health Organization Director-General Margaret Chan, not shown, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Monday, July 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, Pool)

The clouds on the horizon

When China spits, Asia swims. Everybody east of Suez learns that ancient tribute to the size and ambitions of the Middle Kingdom. Now Asia hears the harsh hocking noise that sounds suspiciously like China clearing its throat.

Judge, attorney corruption egregious

Cal Thomas' op-ed is spot-on about the way in which the corruption, disorder and division in our society is a reflection of what's in the hearts of each of us ("Cause and effect," Web, July 20). I don't believe the loss of Christianity is to blame because throughout history wickedness has been carried out by those who describe themselves as Christians. It is undeniable that we have lost the values, the "moral gravity that once kept us grounded, and the boundaries that kept us safe."

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Bridge Ladies: A Memoir'

Appealing is the word that kept recurring in my mind as I read literary agent and author Betsy Lerner's memoir of getting to know her mother's circle of contemporaries who have gathered each Monday yea these many long decades for lunch, bridge and much, much more.

Recent but undated handout photo issued on Friday July 22, 2016 by William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, of Britain's Prince George with the family dog Lupo, at Sandringham in Norfolk, England. Prince George celebrates his third birthday on July 22, 2016. (Matt Porteous/Handout via AP)

An awful crime in Blighty

There's a new crisis in Old Blighty. Prince George, son of the duke and duchess of Cambridge and grandson of Queen Elizabeth II, could soon be a common felon, and he's not quite 3 years old. It's not likely, but you never know. There's photographic proof that he committed a dastardly deed.

Illegals erode more than borders

The title of Donald Lambro's recent op-ed "This bizarre election year" (Web, July 14) teased the reader into thinking the piece was a fair and balanced review of the two 2016 presidential candidates. Instead it was a one-sided attack on the basic tenets of Donald Trump's plan to control our southern border, end sanctuary havens for illegal immigrants and enforce laws to preserve employment opportunities for law-abiding citizens.

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking to members of the media in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2016, after getting briefed on the investigation of a shooting at a nightclub in Orlando by FBI Director James Comey, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, and other officials.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Barack Obama, the condolence man

President Obama tries to project a sunny outlook on the world, mostly by denying that anything bad is happening anywhere. But he's having a hard time of it staying ahead of the radical Islamic terrorists who, he says, don't really exist.