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Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

Working Together to Stop Nuclear Terror Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The growing threat of nuclear terrorism

The greatest challenge to global security is the nuclear threat from rogue states, led by North Korea and Iran. There will be no progress in ensuring global nuclear stability without cooperation between the United States and Russia. This should be a major priority for Presidents Trump and Putin. Much has been made of states trying to secure their borders against terrorist threats. While it is essential that borders are secured, terrorism is tackled and hatred confronted, we cannot ignore the greatest contemporary threat of all, nuclear attacks. It feels remote and unlikely, but is a very clear and present danger.

Social warriors, sometimes

- The Washington Times

Rape stories, when they can be used to vault social-justice issues into the nation’s psyche, get exhaustive coverage and opining by the mainstream media, regardless of whether they’re even true.

Refugee Comparison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting unrestricted immigration with a false equivalent

President Trump has issued a modified version of his previous immigration policy executive order that was stalled six weeks ago by a federal judge in the state of Washington. Mr. Trump has been under relentless attack from those on the left against his efforts to limit immigration from terrorist-producing areas and his call for comprehensive vetting and background checks. Beyond doubt, it is the first and most important duty of a president to protect the lives of a country’s citizens, especially where a possibility exists of terrorists being embedded within a particular immigration flow. As the president previously stated, to not strictly enforce our immigration laws is “not compassion but recklessness.”

President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of ‘21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of ‘21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state’s voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same “progressives” who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O’Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland’s ‘safe’ environment

A rough translation of Maryland’s state motto is “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words.” In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Illustration on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

When politicians judge jurists

I have spent this past week watching the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogating U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch is President Trump’s nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start “winning” its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats’ blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday’s confirmation hearing.

Illustration on Kim's North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s pivot to North Korea

America can do anything but America can’t do everything, at least not within a four-year time frame. That suggests that the American president — any American president — needs to prioritize.

Illustration of Chuck Brunie by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chuck Brunie, an investor exemplar

What are more important to the health of an intellectual movement, writers and academics or investors and philanthropists? That thought occurred to me when I was informed of the death of Chuck Brunie, the former longtime chairman of the board of the Manhattan Institute and the chairman emeritus of The American Spectator.

Related Articles

In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, file photo, people hold signs during a rally to advocating to make Bridgeport a sanctuary city outside City Hall in Bridgeport, Conn. (Brian A. Pounds/Hearst Connecticut Media via AP) ** FILE **

'Sedition' suits against sanctuary schools good step

- The Washington Times

The David Horowitz Freedom Center in Los Angeles is kicking into high gear a campaign against 11 schools in California known as safe havens for illegals, telling them, in no uncertain terms: Stop the sanctuary madness. Or else we'll prosecute you "for sedition," group founder Horowitz wrote, in an online post.

In this July 7, 2016, file photo, FBI Director James B. Comey testifies before the House Oversight Committee about Hillary Clinton's email investigation, at the Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

California Dem brings on the crazy -- 'shutdown' Trump!

- The Washington Times

A Democrat in California -- a say-no-more type of phrase, if ever there was one -- has issued a fiery statement against President Donald Trump, calling on fellow crazed Democrats -- a redundant type of phrase, if ever there was one -- to subvert any and all White House policies, packages, proposals and programs.

President Donald Trump meets with truckers and industry CEOs regarding healthcare, Thursday, March 23, 2017, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Trump sends ultimatum: Pass Obamacare or ...

- The Washington Times

Oh my, Republicans are in a spot. On Obamacare, it seems, President Donald Trump ain't playing, and late Thursday evening, he sent that message House Republicans' way, telling them to pass the reform plan -- or face the wrath of voters because he's moving on to other legislative matters.

Giving Shakespeare novel treatment

Jeanette Winterson's scintillating, clever "The Gap of Time" ($15, 273 pages) is the first of the novels commissioned by the Hogarth Press in honor of the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, each of which takes one of the Bard's plays and rewrites it as a novel.

President Donald Trump jokes as he sits in the drivers seat of an 18-wheeler as he meets with truckers and CEOs regarding healthcare on the South Lawn of the White House, Thursday, March 23, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

It's always Trump's fault

The mainstream media pile-on of the Department of Homeland Security for its directive banning laptops, tablets and other electronic devices on direct flights from cities in eight predominately Muslim countries to the United States follows a familiar pattern.

Plastic cups spell out Rockville Strong, at Rockville High School in Rockville, Maryland, on Thursday, March 23, 2017. The school has been thrust into the national immigration debate after a 14-year-old student said she was raped in a bathroom, allegedly by two classmates, including one who authorities said came to the U.S. illegally from Central America. (AP Photo/Brian Witte)

Reading, writing, and raping

Rape was once a capital crime almost everywhere. But the politically correct culture, with its gift for dumbing down everything, regards rape now not as a felony, but a misdemeanor, something like shoplifting.

School choice will unlock potential

Just as it would be impossible to sell a cake containing all the wrong ingredients, it's not possible to sell a school-choice scheme that is as far removed from school choice as East is from West. Not only does school choice not have to cost one dime, but it will save countless billions for hardworking taxpayers and provide every child the opportunity for a quality education that meets their needs, talents and faith. This will result in fewer dropouts, less crime, fewer gangs and less need for welfare, government health-care, abortions and prisons. It will surely usher in a new era of liberty, justice, prosperity and domestic tranquility.

Turkey must leave Cyprus

Like an overbearing parent, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu prescribes how Cypriots must obey Turkey in order to have a future ("Turkey's vision for Cyprus," Web, March 19). Yet the progress made in the negotiations between Turkey and Cyprus is a result of the leaders of the Cypriot communities taking ownership of the negotiation process and painstakingly defining their own common vision for the future, one in which they share the duties of running a country.