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Chart to accompany Moore article March 30, 2015

Not hard at work but hardly working

The great conundrum of the U.S. economy today is that we have record numbers of working-age Americans out of the labor force at the same time we have businesses desperately trying to find workers. For example, the American Transportation Research Institute estimates there are about 35,000 trucker jobs that could be filled tomorrow if workers would take these jobs — a shortage that could rise to 240,000 by 2022.

Phasing out renewable energy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pulling the plug on renewable energy

There is never a good time for bad public policy. For few policies is this more evident than renewable energy mandates (REM), variously known as renewable portfolio standards, alternative energy standards and renewable energy standards.

Illustration on Putin's designs on eastern Europe BY Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Russia’s grab for its neighbors

A bipartisan consensus is emerging that the United States should do more to address Russia’s continuing aggression against Ukraine. But Russian revanchism does not begin or end with Ukraine, nor are “little green men” its only foreign policy instrument. Moscow is actively engaged in subversive activities along Europe’s eastern flank, targeting the region’s economic and political stability. As Central European capitals grow increasingly concerned, Washington urgently needs to demonstrate its robust commitment not just to the region’s security but to its democratic future.

Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, wearing an army uniform, ride on an armed truck to patrol the international airport in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 28, 2015. Yemen's President Abed Raboo Mansour Hadi, speaking at an Arab summit in Egypt on Saturday, called Shiite rebels who forced him to flee the country "puppets of Iran," directly blaming the Islamic Republic for the chaos there and demanding airstrikes against rebel positions continue until they surrender. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Why Yemen matters

Thoughts on the shifting dynamics in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama’s love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That’s good enough for me. He says he’s a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that’s good enough for God it’s good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they’re working on it).

Obamacare in a death spiral illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obamacare flying machine begins a death spiral

The Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, the case challenging the Obama administration’s decision to award tax credits for health insurance sold through federally established exchanges, could turn on the question of whether a ruling that ends the tax credits on federal exchanges might cause something known as a “death spiral” in health insurance markets.

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz’s announcement this week that he’s running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the “1 percent.” While it’s still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it’s assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee’s platform.

Illustration on the lack of U.S abortion data by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unhealthy state of abortion statistics

Abortion advocates in Congress and in state legislatures claim that abortions are “safe.” Yet numerous, long-standing problems at the state and federal level illustrate that the abortion data collection and reporting system in the United States is haphazard and dysfunctional, making assertions about “abortion safety” unreliable.

Illustration on the Cotton letter's impact on nuclear talks with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tom Cotton, tragic hero

The snarky quip attributed to 19th-century French Foreign Minister Charles Maurice de Talleyrand — “It was worse than a crime; it was a blunder” — has recently been making the rounds to deride a letter written by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and signed by 46 other senators.

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FILE  In this March 25, 2015 file photo, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. waits on the floor of the House Capitol Hill in Washington for the arrival of Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani, who was to speak before  a joint meeting of Congress. Reid is announcing he will not seek re-election to another term. The 75-year-old Reid says in a statement issued by his office Friday that he wants to make sure Democrats regain control of the Senate next year and that it would be "inappropriate" for him to soak up campaign resources when he could be focusing on putting the Democrats back in power. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The end of a Senate era

Harry Reid still has one good eye, and it's enough to read the handwriting on the wall. Announcing that he won't run for a sixth term, he said Friday that he wants to "go out at the top of my game." That's a face-saving way of saying he doesn't want to go out feet first.

Islamic State won't stay in Middle East

Last summer I wrote several letters urging U.S. forces to take out the Islamic State before the terrorist group strikes America. I argued that the Islamic State might have its sights set on Capitol Hill or Hollywood. Given the terrorists' twisted logic, they believe these two iconic landmarks are the symbols of American hedonism and must be destroyed.

Some of the parents of the kidnapped school girls sit outside a compound during a meeting in Chibok, Nigeria. At least 11 parents of the more than 200 kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls will never see their daughters again. Since the mass abduction of the schoolgirls by Islamic extremists three months ago, at least 11 of their parents have died and their hometown, Chibok, is under siege from the militants, residents report. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba, File)

The missing girls of Nigeria

Almost a year has gone by since Boko Haram, a radical and violent subsect of Islam, kidnapped 276 Nigerian schoolgirls from the Nigerian village of Chibok. Hopes of a rescue were raised when the Nigerian army called a truce between government forces and the militant Islamist group in October, but few believed a swift or good outcome was likely. So far there hasn't been one. Good faith, alas, rarely survives in Africa.

Hypocrite Obama has armed guards

Now that the Islamic State has declared war on our stateside personnel ("U.S. sees 'more sophistication' in Islamic State cyber capabilities," Web, March 21) it is time President Obama rescinded his inappropriate executive order denying officers and staff noncommissioned officers the ability to be armed while on base or when traveling to and from their homes and quarters.

Penalty for straying from ‘tribe’?

The Washington Times has risen one notch in my estimation by publishing Eric Althoff's article on former Rep. Bob Inglis, South Carolina Republican ("Bob Inglis breaks from Republican Party, advocates action to fight climate change," Web, March 24). While a climate change denier such as Willy Soon is being called a hero (rather than a rogue for accepting $1 million to shill for the fossil-fuel industry), a real hero such as Mr. Inglis gets booted out of the "tribe" for having the temerity to take a principled position not endorsed by Rush Limbaugh or Fox News.