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Supporters gather for a rally to protest the removal of Confederate flags from the Confederate Memorial Saturday, June 27, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala.   (Julie Bennett/AL.com via AP) MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

The Civil War that never ends

- The Washington Times

Breaking news from 1865: There’s a war on between the North and the South. This time it’s barely more civil than last time, though we aren’t shooting at each other. Yet.

Illustration on providing more support for loved ones caring for wounded veterans by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

A call to share the care

As America continues to strengthen the care we provide to those who have gone to war on behalf of our nation, we must recognize that for too long we have overlooked the most valuable individuals entrusted with the well-being of our wounded, ill and injured veterans. Nearly five-and-a-half million spouses, parents, children and other loved ones have voluntarily put their lives on hold to provide our returning service members with a trusted continuum of care that could not be replicated without them. Many of them will provide this care for years, if not decades to come.

Illustration on providing more support for loved ones caring for wounded veterans by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

A call to share the care

America appreciates, honors and praises veterans who serve our country. But standing out of the ceremonial limelight, and always close by, are the millions of loved ones who care for those veterans. Our service members have returned home with disabling illnesses and injuries that often alter their lives — and the lives of their loved ones — forever. I am one of the 5.5 million military caregivers who witness and endure the long-term consequences of war in a way that many Americans will never experience.

Bankruptcy is the only way Greece can fashion a new beginning

Almost every option facing debt-drenched Greece is bad, but there is only one that will end this Greek tragedy for good. Let Greece go bankrupt. Then let this once-rich nation, hit the restart button to rebuild its economy.

U.S. President Ronald Reagan gestures as Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev looks on after their third session of talks at the Hofdi in Reykjavik, Oct. 12, 1986. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

Obama’s Reykjavik moment

The choice for the president on the Iran nuclear talks is clear: walk away with dignity or appease and submit in disgrace.

Obama’s Clean Power Plan could push millions of minority Americans into poverty

This summer the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will finalize its carbon-dioxide emission regulations under President Obama’s Clean Power Plan. The EPA’s own data projects the regulations will reduce global carbon by less than 1 percent and sea level rise by one one-hundredth of an inch. The price Americans will pay for these “benefits” is layoffs and increased energy rates. Yet for the nation’s most vulnerable, the impacts will be far worse, pushing millions into poverty.

‘Death with dignity’ is often coerced by those with financial interests

Earlier this year, legislation was introduced to the D.C. Council that would legalize physician-assisted suicide in our nation’s capital for an adult patient diagnosed with a terminal condition and less than six months to live. Although this initiative has been introduced in 24 states this year (not passing in any so far), its passage in the District of Columbia this year risks setting a dangerous precedent for the rest of the nation.

(Photo courtesy of The White House)

The surging truth-tellers of the GOP

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is surging in New Hampshire, and Chris Christie’s back on the hunt, sounding like a born-again contender. They’re both long shots — the Donald is off the board — but they’re making the kind of noise the wiseheads say they can’t make.

Members of left wing parties hold placards reading in Greek ''NO'' next to a Presidential Guard, Evzonas, during a protest outside the Greek Parliament in Athens, Sunday, June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says the Bank of Greece has recommended that banks remain closed and restrictions be imposed on transactions, after the European Central Bank didn't increase the amount of emergency liquidity the lenders can access from the central bank. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

The Greeks should vote “no!”

Voting “no” offers Greeks some prospects for better solutions, whereas voting “yes” guarantees penury.

Illustration on the uncontrolled growth of Federal banking regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The squeeze of regulatory kudzu

It is called the vine that ate the South. Kudzu was first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia as an ornamental plant for home gardens. It pretty much stayed that way for half a century, until the federal government got involved. The Roosevelt administration decided that kudzu would be helpful against soil erosion and made it a mission of the Soil Erosion Service to plant kudzu all across the South. Now kudzu covers 12,000 square miles. Kudzu is estimated to smother another 150,000 acres each year.

Energy Independence Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A declaration of energy independence

The United States is closer than ever before to fulfilling the vision of our Founding Fathers. By achieving energy independence, we can achieve freedom from foreign influence.

Fireworks Warning Label Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The sticky legalisms of wacky warning labels

Not too long ago, common sense ruled the day, so called because it was shared by nearly everybody. Common values, commonly understood sense of right and wrong, just and unjust, all expressed in a common language of fairness.

Related Articles

Nancy Reagan turned 94 on Monday. (Photo courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation)

Cheerful on her birthday: Nancy Reagan at 94

- The Washington Times

Nancy Reagan turned 94 on Monday, complete with a birthday cake trimmed with pink posies, her face aglow with an expectant smile. Social media hummed with well wishes for the former first lady, and observations about her continuing place in history.

Illustration on core beliefs regarding marriage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why evangelicals must return to the core

In the matter of the "culture wars," evangelical Christians are asking, "What do we do now?" The question is being raised in the aftermath of the Supreme Court's decision striking down state laws reserving marriage for heterosexual couples.

The brain-scanning MRI machine that was used at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, for an experiment on tracking brain data is seen on campus Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014.  (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Taxing health and progress

Dreaming up innovative products that make living easier and even save lives requires creating something unimagined out of vision and thin air. That's why President Obama's tax on medical devices has never made sense. It steals the seed corn that talented scientists and engineers need to fund their ideas, and it hobbles efforts to build a healthier and more productive nation. The medical device tax is a drag on progress, and even some "progressives" understand that.

Don't expect much from SCOTUS

Two landmark Supreme Court decisions did more than legalize abortion and same-sex marriage. They also validated a Bible passage in Timothy 1:9-10, which reads, "We know the law is made not for the righteous, but for the lawbreakers and rebels, the ungodly and sinful, the unholy and irreligious, for murderers, and the sexually immoral."

President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, center, speaks at the funeral of the top public prosecutor Hisham Barakat, killed in a terrorist attack, as he was surrounded by Barakat's family members in Cairo, Egypt. (Egyptian Presidency via AP, File)

Adrift in the Middle East

President Obama has a problem with his eyes. He doesn't easily discern the difference between friend and foe in the Middle East. He has redeemed his campaign promise "to put some light" between the United States and Israel, though he confuses "light" with destructive space. Worse, the administration has alternately ignored reality, supported the wrong side, imposed a military assistance embargo, only to lift it, all to damage the Egyptian relationship with the United States.

Failed States Breech Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The rise of the failed states

The greatest threat to global security is the rapidly increasing number of failed states. Even though there is no agreed-upon definition of a failed state, it is generally understood that when a government can no longer provide basic security to its people due to a rise in violence or extreme poverty, or loses control over part of its territory to domestic or foreign terrorist groups, the state has failed.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Goebbels: A Biography'

Hannah Arendt had Adolf Eichmann in mind when she coined the term "Banality of Evil," but she might as well have been thinking of Joseph Goebbels.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton peers over a podium while addressing an audience during a campaign stop at Trident Technical College, Wednesday, June 17, 2015, in North Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

The big debut: Hillary Clinton gives her first national interview to CNN on Tuesday

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton did not choose Fox News for her very first national interview since she announced her White House bid three months ago. That honor goes to CNN, though the network draws a much smaller audience: Fox News typically draws 2.2 million during primetime, CNN 619,000 according to Neilsen. But no matter. Mrs. Clinton will veer off the Iowa campaign trail on Tuesday long enough to sit down with CNN's senior political correspondent Brianna Keilar; the exchange will air at 5 p.m. and again three hours later.

House Speaker John A. Boehner of Ohio administered the oath of office to newly elected members of the 114th Congress, as Republicans assumed control of both chambers for the first time in eight years. Mr. Boehner began his third term as speaker. (Associated Press)

Still annoyed: 91 percent of Americans now give Congress a negative job review

- The Washington Times

The nation appears united about about one thing: Americans remain critical of Congress, with an average nine-out-of-10 overall giving lawmakers are negative review. This includes Republicans, Democrats and independents, according to a new Harris Poll. This is the third month for rock-bottom reviews for Congress the pollster says - a finding often reflected in multiple surveys which reveal that the public is weary of partisan gridlock, a "do nothing" attitude among elected officials and continuing acrimony between the parties.

Israel, support Syria's Druze

The conflicts in Syria have increased the complexity of the Middle East situation and exacerbated the instability in the region. Terrorists have taken advantage of this instability and made dramatic territorial gains in Syria and Iraq. They now threaten two minorities: the Kurds and the Druze.

Bishops' comments miss mark?

The Catholic Bishops' comments in "Bishops blast Supreme Court's same-sex marriage ruling as 'tragic error'" (Web, June 26) miss the mark in condemning the recent Supreme Court ruling that affords lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people equal rights and protections under the law. Real "religious freedom" upholds an individual's decision to live in accordance with their sexual identity and religious values. Discrimination on the basis of such is not a Catholic value.

Respect, but not love

I agree with Jeb Bush's recent comment that "we should love our neighbor and respect others" (Jeb Bush: Same-sex marriage should have been decided by states," Web, June 26). However, I could never love an action that finds so much displeasure in the sight of God.