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George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The party’s over and no place to call home

- The Washington Times

That’s the dilemma of the Democrats, forlorn, despondent and walking in circles like the goose hit on the head with a long-handled wooden spoon. They’re asking questions for which there are no happy answers in the wake of their fourth straight loss in a round of special elections.

Illustration of Anne Morgan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Anne Morgan, an American Hero

The United States was finally in “the war to end all wars.” France had been ravaged since the summer of 1914. Villages and towns were obliterated. Women and children went hungry and homeless as the armies wrestled in futile combat in mud, blood and indescribable filth and disease. The British lost 20,000 dead in a single day at the Battle of the Somme.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn’t your insurance talking. It’s doctoring. It’s nursing. It’s medical technology. It’s your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can’t prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn’t do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.

Illustration on the devaluation of U.S. bonds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uncle Sam’s F-rated bonds

Were the United States any other country, its bonds would have long ago been downgraded to junk.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times

The thing people like about House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is that he is a serious guy who is capable of thinking big and has an ambitious agenda to salvage our ungovernable federal bureaucracy.

Photojournalist Shay Horse said he was pepper-sprayed while covering protests at the Jan. 21 presidential inauguration, even though his camera identified him as a journalist. (Sarah Nelson / The Washington Times)

Is ACLU lawsuit against D.C. cops a red herring?

- The Washington Times

“An officer told us to drop our pants,” Shay Horse said. “An officer went down the row telling each of us not to flinch as he grabbed our balls and yanked on them, and then stuck his finger up each of our anuses and wiggled it around. I felt like they were using molestation and rape as punishment.”

Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Trump and his generals

Donald Trump earned respect from the Washington establishment for appointing three of the nation’s most accomplished generals to direct his national security policy: James Mattis (secretary of defense), H.R. McMaster (national security adviser) and John Kelly (secretary of homeland security).

Sponsor of Terror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Qatar threatens peace

Qatar, a small oil- and gas-rich nation in the Arabian Peninsula, has been boycotted by its neighbors, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt. Other nations, including Libya, Maldives, Mauritania, Jordan, Djibouti and Senegal, also have commenced severe diplomatic measures against Qatar.

Illustration of American consul Raymond Geist              The Washington Times

A disingenuous handling of the Jewish refugee issue in ‘Genius’

Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time. His contributions to physics revolutionized our understanding of the universe. The current television series based on his life is appropriately titled “Genius.” But did he also help facilitate a mass rescue of Jews from Germany?

In this file photo taken Aug. 31, 2015, a cow grazes at Hickory Hill Milk in Edgefield, S.C. (Susan Ardis/The State via AP)

The fallacy of ‘unhealthy competition’

Just when you thought liberals were focusing only on destroying our government, there is now ample evidence that fellow travelers have been working diligently to destroy the ideas and dreams of our young people.

Related Articles

In this photo taken Sunday, June 4, 2017, a woman church leader reads from a bible in her native Bari language, at the United Church which is held in a school classroom tent, in Bidi Bidi refugee settlement in northern Uganda. The South Sudanese refugees meet in open-air churches rigged from timber with seats made only from planks of wood or logs drilled into the ground, yet these churches for the born-again Christians are oases of joy among the daily humiliations that come with rebuilding their lives. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Christians battle GuideStar on 'hate group' tag

- The Washington Times

Conservative and Christian organizations dinged by GuideStar as "hate groups" have risen up and launched a counter-attack, asking the supposed nonpartisan watchdog of the nonprofit world to reverse course and remove the labels. And well GuideStar should.

President Donald Trump speaks during the Congressional Picnic on the South Lawn of the White House, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Hallelujah -- North Korea thinks Trump's nuts

- The Washington Times

North Korea, via its state-run Communist Party newspaper, put out the message that President Donald Trump's a "psychopath" who needs to be curbed and controlled. Hallelujah. North Korea thinks Trump's a nutcase. It's just such messaging that's great for America -- that's great for America's national security.

A man passes by a TV news program showing a photo published in North Korea's Rodong Sinmun newspaper of North Korea's new type of cruise missile launch, at Seoul Railway station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, June 9, 2017. North Korea said Friday it has tested a new type of cruise missile that could strike U.S. and South Korean warships "at will" if it is attacked, in an apparent reference to the projectiles detected by Seoul when they were launched a day earlier. The signs read "Can hit on the ground." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) ** FILE **

North Korea tests rocket engine for ICBM

If there was ever a deadly challenge designed for newly elected President Donald Trump, North Korea is it. The hermit regime, which is hell-bent on threatening the United States and its allies in the Pacific with destruction, has just tested a large rocket engine that analysts believe is designed to power an intercontinental ballistic missile, you know, the kind that can destroy a U.S. city in 20 minutes.

Actor Johnny Depp introduces a film at the Glastonbury music festival at Worthy Farm, in Somerset, England, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo by Grant Pollard/Invision/AP)

Johnny Depp skates on kill Trump joke -- unlike Obama clown

- The Washington Times

Johnny Depp, Hollywood movie star, made a tasteless joke about President Donald Trump's assassination, and the media yawned. But if this had been about Barack Obama, the mainstream media would be alive with rage, and the jokester would be out of work. Remember the Missouri rodeo clown?

Now they want to read

I find it laughable that the Democratic congressional members are claiming no one has had time to read or study the 1,000-page, Republican-sponsored Obamacare modification. Yet I seem to remember that in 2010, then House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged Congress to pass President Obama's 2,000-page health-care act so that Congress and all of America could "find out what's in it "

No one-party rule in Taiwan

Numerous social media accounts in Taiwan have been suspended for the 'crime' of criticizing Taiwan's government. The Taiwanese news media tend to self-regulate in order to avoid rejection of license renewal, and they hesitate to report protests or other anti-government-related events.

In this image from video provided by C-SPAN, Wall Street Journal reporter Jay Solomon is interview on the C-SPAN program Washington Journal on Sept. 23, 2014 in Washington. The Wall Street Journal on June 21, 2017, fired Solomon after evidence emerged about his involvement in prospective business deals, including one involving arms sales to foreign governments, with an international businessman who was one of his key sources. Solomon was offered a 10 percent stake in a fledgling company, Denx LLC, by Farhad Azima, an Iranian-born aviation magnate who ferried weapons for the CIA. It was not clear whether Solomon ever received money or formally accepted a stake in the company. Solomon did not immediately comment. (C-SPAN via AP)

Upholding a media standard

Newspaper reporters aren't expected to be purer than Caesar's wife (not even the wife of a Julius Caesar passing as Donald Trump), but a reporter who doesn't measure up to his newspaper's established ethical standards can expect to pay for it.

Sunshine on the wall

Congressional Democrats love to spend money on solar power and infrastructure projects, and President Trump has given them something to think about -- using the sun to power and pay for his border wall.

Terrorists come in all shapes, shades

The recent shooting at a Republican congressional baseball practice in Alexandria attests to the terrifying reality that no one, not even our highest elected officials, is safe from the disturbing nationwide increase in violent acts. Particularly troubling is that the shooter, James Hodgkinson, appears to have made a calculated attempt to inculcate fear with his fierce opposition to President Trump and the GOP.