Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending religious liberty

I write with a deep and growing concern about the future of religious liberty in the United States.

Mike Pence, Conservative Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Pence makes sense

Whenever I talk to conservatives across the country about the presidential election, a common refrain is that they find Donald Trump refreshing in many ways. They like that he eschews political correctness and promises to stand up for ordinary Americans against the elites.

SM-3 Missile Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending against the growing missile threat

Both Iran and North Korea are rogue nations developing and testing new missile technologies at an alarming rate. Iran threatens U.S. forces and has missile technology to carry out those threats. North Korea has successfully tested missiles that can be fired from submarines and is threatening to use them.

Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

Tim Kaine (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A sad tale of two disposable veeps

- The Washington Times

A governor is always a good choice for a vice president. He (or she) has learned how to run an administration, how to work with a cranky legislature and understands staying close to the people who elected him. There’s no Praetorian guard to keep him separated from the people.

Illustration on the history of the Democratic Party convention by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unconventional Democrats

It’s Democratic convention time, and while this year’s shindig may not be anything to write home about, the confabs in the old days were knock-down, drag-out affairs. For example, it took nine ballots to nominate James K. Polk in 1844; 49 for Franklin Pierce in 1852, 17 for James Buchanan in 1856, and 22 for Horatio Seymour in 1868.

Illustration on leveraging U.S. visas against China's territorial aggression in the South China Sea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Reversing China’s South China Sea grab

The South China Sea (SCS) is currently the focus of a dispute between the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei. The PRC has preemptively deployed military personnel and equipment to enforce their claims to a trumped-up, self-identified but unrecognized “nine-dash line,” an imagined boundary that is inconsistent with international law and commonly accepted international behavior.

Illustration on all terrain powered wheelchairs for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wheelchairs for veterans

Many Americans are familiar with the military creed of never leaving a fallen comrade behind, a commitment that has served as the real-life inspiration for Hollywood movies chronicling daring rescue operations under impossible odds of injured or captured service members.

In-Activist Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to defeat activists

This month, Congress passed a bill requiring all genetically improved foods to be labeled. But it’s essentially meaningless. Genetically improved foods are just as safe as the veggies in a backyard garden, and virtually all foods — organic or not — have been genetically improved at some point in their history.

Related Articles

Delegates cheer during the third day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Wednesday, July 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

An unconventional abridgment of free speech

This summer, we have all witnessed the heavy hand of government intervening in the freedom of speech, as the behavior of the Secret Service at both the Republican convention in Cleveland and the Democratic convention in Philadelphia has been troubling and unconstitutional.

Illustration on the changing weapons used in the war between the sexes by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Changing at the speed of light

Sexual politics continues to change at the speed of light. Some men get it, others don't. Among those who don't is Roger Ailes, who thought he could continue to star in an episode of "Mad Men" long after the sitcom and the era it represented passed its sell-by date.

A voter marks a ballot for the New Hampshire primary inside a voting booth on Feb. 9 in Manchester, N.H. (Associated Press)

The other battle at the ballot box

Party conventions, first of the Republicans in Cleveland and this week of the Democrats in Philadelphia, first and foremost are about whose name goes on the top of the ballot. Before any votes are cast on Nov. 8, though, questions must be settled about identification rules determining who gets to cast a ballot. Voter identification laws, popularly called ID laws, have proliferated.

No more Clinton laundry in White House

After watching former President Bill Clinton give his speech at the Democratic National Convention, one would have to come away thinking that old "Slick Willie" had once again hit it out of the proverbial ballpark. That is, until you look at what he said and didn't say.

California delegates hold up signs as they cheer during the third day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Wednesday, July 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Dreaming the impossible Democratic dream

The Democrats had better pack a good lunch on their way to the post-convention campaign. It's going to be an all-day job. They must persuade voters to avoid looking at Barack Obama's disaster of "hope and change" while Hillary Clinton pushes the party's platform of more of the same. The platform, as adopted in Philadelphia this week, is an exercise in the old shell game.

Superficial convention

The Democratic National Convention has done a lot to live up to the stupidity of the likes of the Clintons, Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid and others too numerous to mention.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Breaking Rockefeller'

The "ambitious rivals" of Peter Doran's subtitle are Marcus Samuels, an East London merchant who built his father's seashell business into Shell Transportation and Trading Company, and in the process developed the first modern oil tanker, capable of navigating the Suez Canal, and Henri Deterding, "a take-no-prisoners oilman" who created Royal Dutch, building on holdings in Dutch colonial outposts.

Value-free DNC

The Democratic National Committee has offered its "deep and sincere apology" to Sen. Bernie Sanders ("DNC -- but not Wasserman Schultz -- offers 'sincere apology' to Sanders over leaked emails." Web, July 25). Like every other habitual criminal, the committee's feelings of remorse come right after being caught.