Skip to content


Featured Articles

President Barack Obama speaks to reporters in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. President Obama is rejecting Russia's military campaign in Syria, saying it fails to distinguish between terrorist groups and moderate rebel forces with a legitimate interest in a negotiated end to the civil war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The cipher in the White House

- The Washington Times

Perhaps it’s not fair to blame Barack Obama for the mess he’s making. The Middle East is where chaos was invented, after all, and perhaps not even the collection of incompetents and boobs the president has installed in the White House could make things this bad. Maybe it’s someone else’s fault. He blames the Jews.

Illustration on Putin's moves in Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Fast-roping toward war in the Middle East

The Russians are rapidly reinforcing their bridgehead in Syria, adding ground troops to their air, marine and naval forces. It is a classic air, land and sea intervention by a military establishment that understands how combined arms build synergies and broaden capabilities.

Responsible Immigration Laws Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Facing the agonizing immigration duty

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that no nation can sustain open borders. Even the wealthiest, most popular “nations of immigrants” such as the United States cannot possibly accept everyone who wants to immigrate or even qualifies to do so.

Illustration on Putin's actions in Syria by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beware Putin and his ‘anti-Hitler coalition’

Contrary to the principles of American foreign policy of the last 70 years, President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry tacitly invited Russia to “help” monitor things in the Middle East. Now they are learning that there are lots of Middle East scenarios far worse than the relative quiet Iraq that the Obama administration inherited in January 2009 — and soon abandoned.

Illustration on the call for a better armed society by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Ban gun-free zones

Would you put a sign outside your house saying, “Doors unlocked,” or “We’re not home”?

Illustration on developing Romania's tourist industry by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ongoing flux in East-Central Europe

For nearly a century, East-Central Europe has been a perennially unsettled region. Pragmatic deals cut after World War I, with more following World War II, have kept the area in an unending state of flux.

Illustration on Putin's Middle East intentions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Pravda’ on Russia in Syria

Pravda is the most abused word in the Russian language. Though it means “truth,” we learned it as the name of a Soviet-era, government-controlled newspaper that printed everything except the truth.

Illustration on the impact of Syrian mass migration to Europe by Schrank, The Independent on Sunday, London, England

Paralysis over Syria

There is turbulence in the eurozone and its disquieting genesis lies in the protracted Syrian civil war, some 750 miles to the east.

Illustration on the position of the D.C. Metropolitan police under Chief Lanier by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrity versus loyalty

Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier is often portrayed by an admiring media as an almost uniquely popular and effective law enforcement leader, who has made the District safer than ever by putting together one of the most effective big city police departments in the country.

Illustration on FDIC targeting of the payday loan industry by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When bureaucrats rule personal preference

Ours is a nation of laws, not men. Our Constitution requires the concurrence of majorities in both houses of Congress and the signature of the president in order to create those laws.

Related Articles

In this July 29,2015 file photo, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. According to GOP lawmakers, Boehner to step down end of October. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

John Boehner and the earmark

John Boehner is leaving the House and the speakership with cheers ringing in his ears and maybe with a few regrets, but looking at the chaos in his wake, watching his Republican colleagues struggling to find a suitable successor, he's entitled to reflect on his own accomplishments. There have been more than a few.

Illustration on the change in House leadership by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Deja vu all over again

- The Washington Times

The more things change, the more they stay the same. A week or so after Bob Dole resigned his Senate leadership role and Senate seat to run for president in 1996, he joined me and Lyn Nofziger for breakfast. We had all been friends for many years and could be honest with each other.

China's President Xi Jinping arrives for the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

Testing China's aggression

President Obama seems to have learned a lesson from his fecklessness in Syria. He has listened to the pleas of Ash Carter, the secretary of defense, to assert the freedom of the seas in Southeast Asia.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., leaves a meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015, ahead of a nomination vote to replace House Speaker John Boehner, who is stepping down, and retiring from Congress, at the end of the month, after nearly five years in the role. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Chaos! The GOP-bashing press gets stuck on a single word following McCarthy revelations

- The Washington Times

"Chaos." That was the operative term among journalists and news organizations who got in some serious Republican bashing following House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's straightforward announcement that he would not seek the role of House Speaker. News coverage immediately swung into gleeful and dramatic mode on Thursday, appearing to suggest the GOP lawmakers were in a state of near riot below the mighty dome of the U.S. Capitol itself. The headlines were very telling.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's recent forays into comedy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Taint funny, Hillary

While the Donald tries to overcome his reputation as an over-the-top television entertainer to caress his ambition to become president, Hillary Rodham Clinton is running for comedienne in chief. She went on "SaturdayNight Live" to trade her high seriousness for laughs. Neither candidate will seal the deal the way they're trying to do it.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Drowned Boy (Inspector Sejer Mysteries)

It is a tragedy when a 16-month-old boy drowns when he scrambles from his home and falls into a pond outside. His mother Carmen is hysterical in her weeping, his father Nikolai is taciturn and oddly bitter.

Cruz stands out and up

Well over 30 years removed from our last truly conservative presidential candidate, a rare opportunity to elect another presents itself in candidate Ted Cruz. Genial of nature yet fierce in conviction, Sen. Cruz needn't be Ronald Reagan any more than Ronald Reagan needed to be Abraham Lincoln. We simply need Cruz to be Cruz.