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Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France — and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel — have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks — and that seems unlikely.

NATO Safe Area for Refugees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Responding to humanitarian catastrophe

The international community just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Accords, a landmark peace agreement that brought an end to the Bosnian War and a grave humanitarian crisis in the Balkans.

Illustration on the need for streamlines conceal carry permits in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/the Washington Times

Fighting ISIS with concealed carry

Following the recent Paris attacks, the Islamic State recently announced its intention to “strike America at its center,” in Washington, D.C. Our response should be swift and decisive.

The Approval of Technical Wrong Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the gun-ignorant make gun laws

When the state of Maryland quietly killed off its 15-year, $5 million social experiment in gun control — so-called “ballistic fingerprinting” — it served up the latest example of people who know nothing about firearms making technical laws about guns. The news of this latest failure (not a single crime solved in 15 years) followed New York shutting down a similar program, and it generated from gun owners and gun makers a tired “We told you so.”

Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon           Associated Press photo

A military witch hunt that almost succeeded

Along with many Americans, I salute The Washington Times for having the courage to not only report on the Air Force general court martial persecution-prosecution of Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon, but to continue following this case with a series of updates from the courtroom trial in Minot, N.D., until the court martial concluded on Nov. 14.

MS St. Louis, 1939. The Voyage of Doom.

Stopping the next Holocaust

By now, in the days following the Paris massacre and the Brussels lockdown, many Americans have been reminded of the awful fate of the S.S. Saint Louis. In 1939, fleeing the impending doom of the Holocaust, some 900 Jews boarded the cruise ship in Hamburg, Germany, and crossed the Atlantic.

Former President George W. Bush speaks at the George W. Bush Institute at Southern Methodist University in Dallas on Feb. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

How Obama cooks the terrorism numbers

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has given an eloquent testimony to a Christian faith, but his sympathies are always with Islam. He insisted from Asia that “99.9 percent of Muslims worldwide reject terrorism,” and that’s good news, if true. But it clearly is not.

Persecution of Christians by Muslims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No Christians and persecuted minorities allowed

Standing before the cameras in Turkey, President Obama found his safe place to indict half his countrymen for raising the issue of religion in their concern over his plan to open America’s gates to tens of thousands of Muslim “refugees” from Syria. Subjecting refugees to a religious test runs counter to American values, said Mr. Obama.

Black-eye Friday Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Wal-Mart’s protests won’t sell

For most Americans, Black Friday is the time to shop around for great deals on new Christmas gifts. For Big Labor, it’s an opportunity to steal the headlines and advance its agenda.

An Israeli policeman collects evidence next to a body of a Palestinian attacker at a West Bank petrol station near Jerusalem, Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. A Palestinian stabbed an Israeli man to death before he was shot dead by security forces. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

Where terror lurks every day

Think back to October 2002, when the Beltway sniper and his young accomplice paralyzed the Washington region for three weeks, sowing fear and keeping people from pumping gas, buying groceries, holding soccer practices or venturing from their homes. Ponder what just happened in Paris.

Illustration on President Obama, the tortured genius by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

President Obama, a ‘tortured genius’

A U.S. Navy SEAL teammate and friend once described the worst type of leader as a “tortured genius.” By this, he did not mean the artist or musician suffering from inspired hysteria, but someone who, no matter how obvious the failing or how fair and valid the criticism, accepts no blame and denies all responsibility. In the mind of such a leader, the rest of the world simply can’t see the “genius” in what they do.

Confused about the enemy

Since the horrific Paris terror attacks, President Obama and the Democrats want you to think that defending ourselves from Islamic terrorism will only make things worse. Bombing the Islamic State, you see, will make it easier for them to recruit.

Illustration on refugees and the visa waiver program by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Entering the country visa-free

In the wake of the Paris terrorist attacks, Americans are more worried than ever about an attack on the United States. Their concerns are aggravated when they hear Washington debating the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), something most people had never heard of before. But it is critical to the security of our nation. The Visa Waiver Program allows visa-free entry to our country.

Selfish Protests on Campus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The grievance generation

Remember the campus unrest in the 1960s? Whether you agreed with the students or not, they were protesting about things of great consequence — like civil rights, or the military draft, or the Vietnam War. They had chants like “hell no, we won’t go.” Those were the good old days.

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U.S. murder rate still high

The U.S. response to the Paris terrorist attacks is a farce. American leaders are using the atrocities as an opportunity to bamboozle the gullible masses by displaying phony outrage and self-righteous indignation. Publicity-addicted celebrities are willing participants in the sham.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gestures as he talks during a news conference at the end of the G-20 summit in Antalya, Turkey, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015. The leaders of the Group of 20 wrapped up their two-day summit near the Turkish Mediterranean coastal city of Antalya Monday against the backdrop of heavy French bombardment of the Islamic State's stronghold in Syria. The bombings marked a significant escalation of France's role in the fight against the extremist group. (Anadolu Agency via AP, Pool)

A new crisis in an old place

These are scary times. Miscalculations can be expensive, paid for by everyone. The shooting of a mere archduke set off World War I, and Japanese militarists thought they saw an unarmed America too proud to fight, and ordered the raid on Pearl Harbor. The Arab nations thought Israel would fold under attack, and started two wars that ended with the Arab nations folding like the accordion.

Recall Roosevelt's message

President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave his 1941 State of the Union address to Congress as Europe was going up in flames. A true leader, Roosevelt spoke of the values that this nation, while imperfect, tried to make a reality.

In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, then-Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

When the spooks get it wrong

Washington is awash in intelligence agencies, some of civilians and others of the military services, 17 by one count, and a lot of what they produce is gobbledygook. Like all bureaucracies, the intelligence agencies want to protect their turf first, and writing in words (many coined on the spot) that only a small audience can understand is a way of protecting the turf.

BOOK REVIEW: 'American Dreams: Restoring Economic Opportunity for Everyone'

Political polls, although increasingly iffy and unreliable, have become a growth industry, with the national media, caught up in a relentless wave of cutbacks and downsizing, routinely using them as primary sources for stories -- a practice no editor would have countenanced not too many years ago.

The Battle for Israeli Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The return of a 47-year-old headline

I was thumbing through an old magazine over the weekend. It was 47 years old to be exact, and I came across a surprisingly prescient piece entitled wittily, "The Arab, the Jew, and the Pickle." What particularly caught my eye was that the piece was written by me in what is now called The American Spectator. Imagine that.

France and Russia join forces to fight terror

It's been a couple of weeks that shook the world -- a world that watched in horror a series of tragic acts in Russia, Lebanon, France, Nigeria, Mali, and other places perpetrated by terrorist organizations.

Thanksgiving dinner. (Associated Press)

Restoring a sense of gratitude

Many Americans still believe in this nation's enduring principlesIt's easy, alas, for our gratitude to become perfunctory -- more something we say than something we feel. But take it from someone who has traveled to many countries: A look at what some people around the globe endure can make your appreciation genuine.

Illustration on advances in the world's situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A bounty of good news

Your Thanksgiving dinner is going to be less expensive. This year the average person will need to work 2 hours, 21 minutes and 57 seconds to pay for all the items in a standard Thanksgiving dinner for 10 people -- a work reduction of one minute and 8 seconds from last year.

U.S. President Barack Obama attends the 10th East Asia Summit at the 27th ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

President Obama's overseas offensive

When a president goes abroad to defend his strategy for defeating an enemy — and the right word here is "enemy," not "rival" or "adversary" — it's a concession that whether he says it explicitly or not, his strategy has failed. Even members of his own party have at last put partisan loyalty aside and openly challenged the president's failed "leadership from behind."

In this Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015 photo, opposition presidential candidate Mauricio Macri waves to supporters during the closing campaign rally in Humahuaca, Jujuy, Argentina. Macri will face the ruling party candidate Daniel Scioli in a Nov. 22 runoff. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Hope for change in Argentina

There's something hopeful to sing about in the Argentine. The election of Mauricio Macri, 56, the center-right mayor of Buenos Aires, as the new president is an attempt — the latest — to write permanent finis to the Peronista epoch in the nation's history.