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Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique

A dictators’ clique of China, Russia, Iran and North Korea threatens democracies everywhere. They are more dangerous than any past dictators because they have or are about to have nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. The best way for peace-loving nations to oppose these dictators is through a global coalition centered on the United States and Europe. The U.S. and European democracies led coalitions that defeated dictators in the World War I, World War II and the Cold War. They can do it again.

Illustration on police and minorities by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Deadly Democratic cities

After a speech in Middletown, Pennsylvania, this week, President Trump sat for an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. No doubt it was friendly territory. For the president, Mr. Hannity’s questions were underhand softballs tossed down the center of the plate, and the replies were vintage Trump.

Illustration on the strategic importance of an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward an independent Kurdistan

The autonomous Kurdistan region of northern Iraq held a referendum on independence on Sept. 25. It was overwhelmingly approved. This referendum, not surprisingly however, has precipitously raised tensions not only with Iraq but also with Turkey, Syria and Iran, all of which have large — and restive — Kurdish minorities.

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Claire McCaskill’s crusade could hurt Native American rights

Let’s establish an important legal concept and set the context. The legal term “sovereign immunity,” according to the Wex Legal Dictionary, means that “the government cannot be sued without its consent.” This doctrine has applied to the federal government, states, public universities and Native American tribes for many years.

Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

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Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla., talks to reporters, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Miami Gardens, Fla. Wilson is standing by her statement that President Donald Trump told Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson killed in an ambush in Niger, that her husband "knew what he signed up for." In a Wednesday morning tweet, Trump said Wilson's description of the call was "fabricated." (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

A clown in a cowboy hat

- The Washington Times

For the good of humanity -- not to mention the notion of self-governance in America -- this woman must be removed from public office.

In this May 23, 2017, file photo, Chelsea Handler arrives at the Netflix Comedy Panel For Your Consideration Event at the Netflix FYSee Space in Beverly Hills, Calif. Handler announced on Oct. 18, 2017, that she is ending her Netflix talk show after two seasons in order to focus on political activism. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File)

Nancy Pelosi, Chelsea Handler: How low can you go

- The Washington Times

How low can you go -- that's the line that comes to mind while reading of House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi's recent sit-down with Chelsea Handler. Yes, that Chelsea Handler -- the one who's known 'round comedy circles as never-too-busy-to-go-vulgar.

Former U.S. President George W. Bush speaks at a forum sponsored by the George W. Bush Institute in New York, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Bush, Obama, McCain, three peas in a cowards' pod

- The Washington Times

Once upon a time, there was a moral concept that taught if you had a problem with somebody, you went to that person directly and spoke of that matter in private -- you didn't throw darts at public walls. Then came Sen. John McCain. And in speedy order, then came George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2017 file photo Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam pauses during an interview in Richmond, Va. Northam said he favors stricter controls on gun ownership. He's backed by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's group as well as by former Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who was grievously wounded in a 2011 shooting. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

A costly Democratic error

The public-opinion polls in the Virginia gubernatorial race are tightening. Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, the Democrat who had opened a comfortable lead over Ed Gillespie, the Republican, over the summer, has only a tiny lead in most polls now, and a new Monmouth survey puts Mr. Gillespie up by a point.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., left, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., walk to a news conference on the Republican tax and budget proposals, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

'Divided we fall'

"United we stand, divided we fall" was a warning of the consequences of political fissures in the age of Lincoln, and it's no less on point now. The United States is splitting in two along political lines, and the ominous trend could spell disaster one day soon enough. Unless Americans can set aside their differences and make common cause about something, the nation could fall into the widening gulf. America is the exceptional nation, but not a nation immune to all risks.

Make statements on own time

I have no problem with the way in which individual players on professional football teams choose to make a statement, political or otherwise. I have a problem with their timing. They are at work from the moment they walk into the stadium until the game is over, or they leave the stadium. If I ever tried to make a big political statement at work I would be counseled or fired immediately. Not televising the national anthem at the beginning of the game takes away the platform the team members exploit to demonstrate their cause.

McCain not worthy of votes

Recently Peter Doocy of Fox News asked Sen. John McCain, Arizona Republican, about his failure to support the president's agenda — the agenda the voters sent both President Trump and Mr. McCain to Washington to fulfill. Mr. McCain called the question stupid, seemingly implying that Mr. Doocy was stupid. Actually, neither the question nor Mr. Doocy is stupid. A lot of Americans would have liked to hear an honest answer from the senator rather than a nasty retort.

Mystery and a divided world during the Korean War

The Korean conflict came in the wake of the global bloodshed of World War II, and it is commemorated by a surreal platoon in a rice paddy portraying the men who fought in a conflict that has become known as the "forgotten war."

In this Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017 photo John McEnroe offers tips to children ages 6 to 12 during tryouts in Harlem for the John McEnroe Tennis Academy in New York. (AP Photo/Michael Noble Jr.) **FILE**

Cheating in sports trickles down to youth level

And as these athletes cheat, it gives tacit permission to those at lower levels of competitions to find a way to skirt the rules. The result runs the gamut from using performance enhancing drugs to lying about the ages of competitors at youth level competitions.

Washington Nationals fans watch the action during Game 5 of baseball's National League Division Series against the Chicago Cubs, at Nationals Park, Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017 in Washington. The Cubs won 9-8 and won the series. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

LOVERRO: To be a Washington fan is to embrace the heartache

It was a subdued crowd, but who would expect much more from the seventh game of an 82-game schedule that no one should expect to lead to anything -- other than, perhaps, something like a 9-8 Game 5 loss to the Cubs. A 115-105 Game 7 loss to the Boston Celtics. A 19-10 season-ending loss to the New York Giants. Or, of course, a 2-0 Game 7 loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Philadelphia Eagles strong safety Malcolm Jenkins, center, raises his fist as he stands between teammates Chris Long, left, and Rodney McLeod during a rendition of the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Washington Redskins, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, in Landover, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Chris Long, NFLer, shows how it's done

- The Washington Times

Hey NFL kneelers: This is how you do it. This is how you fight a cause -- press an agenda -- push a platform. Effectively, that is. Philadelphia Eagles defensive end Chris Long's foundation announced this week that the NFLer's final ten paychecks in 2017 would be given to charity.

In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017, file photo, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, right, and U.S. President Donald Trump shake hands at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner, File)

George Will high-fives elitism, paints Trump as idiot

- The Washington Times

George Will, so-called voice of the conservatives -- but really, spokesman for the elites in the Republican Party -- slammed President Donald Trump on national television as an idiot. And he did it in that quasi-clever English style of feigning compliment while poking sarcastic fun. Gotta love the English sense of humor, right?

Wearing a burqa, Karen Aizha Hamidon, the widow of the leader of a militant band allegedly sympathetic to the Islamic State group, is presented to reporters during a news conference at the National Bureau of Investigation in Manila, Philippines, on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. Authorities said she recruited foreign fighters to the country and spread extremist propaganda. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Quebec's smart ban on burqa-wearers from public services

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump may be fighting off accusations -- unfounded and ridiculous -- that his travel ban on terror hotspot tourists is actually a Muslim ban. But in Quebec, it's much, much closer to the real thing, Lawmakers there just passed a bill barring those who wear face coverings -- yes, like the niqab, like the burqa -- from accessing public services.