Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the non-efficacy of "evidence-based" review of government programs by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama’s bogus cure for boondoggles

In the 1930s, peasants who were starving due to the Soviet regime’s brutal farm collectivization policy lamented, “If only Stalin knew.” Nowadays, American social scientists look at floundering federal programs and lament: “If only Congress knew.” The solution, they say, is the “evidence-based” reform movement, which will magically beget a new era of good governance.

The Folly of Food Labels Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Package police on the prowl

Britain and Australia both have images of Queen Elizabeth on their money, use the metric system, and add the letter “u” to words like “color.” Soon they could have another thing in common: Neither will have branding on their cigarette packages.

Illustration on Obama's veto of the Keystone pipeline by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Killing Keystone

In the days leading up to President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline, 14 oil tanker railroad cars derailed in West Virginia and exploded in a fiery environmental disaster.

Illustration on safety improvements to oil rail transport by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tanking up on safety

Railroads share the public’s deep concern for the safe movement of crude oil by rail and, as recent incidents have shown us, freight railroads and others who share responsibility for the shipment of oil must continue to make improvements to ensure public confidence.

Peace in the Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Like-to-like ethnic migration in the Middle East

Population shifts resulting from Syria’s four-year-long civil war have profoundly changed Syria and its three Arabic-speaking neighbors: Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan. (Turkey and Israel have changed too, but less so.) Ironically, amid tragedy and horror, as populations adapt to the brutal imperatives of modern nationalism, all four countries are becoming a bit more stable. That’s because the fighting has pushed peoples to move from ethnic minority status to ethnic majority status, encouraging like to live with like.

Oscar’s gem from across the ocean

Hollywood can’t help itself. The glitteries inevitably use the Academy Awards to push their personal politics, sometimes cheap and occasionally not, rewarding razzle-dazzle over real life. This year the two most important Oscars, for best picture and best director, went to “Birdman,” about razzle-dazzle, and not “Boyhood,” about real life.

FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2014 file photo, President Barack Obama meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama does not intend to be silent or out of sight when Netanyahu addresses Congress in a visit that was arranged by Speaker John Boehner behind the administration’s back. The breach of protocol has grown to what seems like a grudge match between two men who dislike each other.  Vice President Biden will be out of town during Netanyahu’s speech, leaving an empty chair behind the Israeli leader’s podium and Secretary of State John Kerry may conveniently find a foreign trip to be on that day as well. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Time to be honest about Israel

Rather than a blow to a bipartisanship that simply doesn’t exist, Mr. Netanyahu’s acceptance of Mr. Boehner’s invitation offers the possibility of clarity and a way forward.

FILE - This Nov. 11, 2014, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol Building illuminated by the setting sun on the National Mall in Washington. When the leaders of the U.S. Olympic Committee meet Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, they'll be deciding on more than a city to put in the running to host the 2024 Summer Games. They'll be picking a partner that will help shape their near- and long-term future.  Leaders from Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington made their presentations last month and will not be present while the 15 USOC board members debate the pros and cons of each offering at their meeting at Denver International Airport. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Control spending to control deficits

Congressional Republicans should remember: Control spending and you control deficits. This is important, as new Republican Senate and House majorities sharpen their pencils to write their first budget. Republicans are going to want that budget to balance. However, if instead of focusing on deficits, they focus on spending, the deficits will take care of themselves.

Illustration on the cumulative dismantling of the Fourth Amendment by the U.S. government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What if the government fears freedom?

What if the current massive spying on Americans began with an innocent secret executive order signed by President Reagan in 1986? What if Reagan contemplated that he was only authorizing American spies to spy on foreign spies unlawfully present in the United States?

Host Neil Patrick Harris speaks at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by John Shearer/Invision/AP)

The Hollywood orthodoxy

Today film making is regarded as a political act, a condition that has altered the viewing experience.

Related Articles

President Obama. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

Governing the Chicago way

Barack Obama is a trailblazer. Most past presidents who get an electoral rebuke like the one he got November would have looked to the examples of Democratic and Republican presidents before him, and tried to accommodate both himself and Congress to reality, and move forward.

Thai elephant rides aid cruelty

Tourists who pay to ride elephants are essentially ensuring that those elephants will spend most of their lives miserable in chains ("Travel: Thailand's great elephant debate," Web, Feb. 24). Unwitting travelers are duped into believing that their money is going to "help" elephants, but international watchdogs have documented that wild elephants are being captured to perpetuate this lucrative tourist industry.

When personal disaster strikes

The tale Jill Ciment tells in "Act of God" is not funny. It's about a fungus infestation that leaves several families homeless and impoverished, and at least one person dead. Nonetheless, this novel breezes along, fizzing with wit as it sails toward a comic ending that leaves the surviving characters rich with possibilities.

 Rajendra K. Pachauri. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan, file)']

Faith-based science comes a cropper

The chief of the United Nations climate change panel is passionate about his global warming beliefs, and some of his passion has gotten out of hand. Passion can do that. Rajendra Pachauri, who shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore, has been forced to resign his post at the U.N. after he was accused of sexual harassment. Every man is entitled to his beliefs, but sometimes he has to keep his beliefs — and his affections — to himself. Mr. Pachauri was appointed to be a chief, not an evangelist.

Convention could do more harm

Former Rep. Tom Coburn is correct in his op-ed, "A means to smite the federal Leviathan" (Web, Feb. 24), when he writes that the government has become a loose cannon and its powers need to be limited. However, Mr. Coburn's remedy will be worse than the disease he's trying to cure.

Portrait of a corrupt state

Poor Rod Blagojevich. He wanted so badly to be successfully corrupt, but was just too dumb to swing it.

President Barack Obama closes his eyes and bows his head as Dr. Joel C. Hunter, senior pastor of Northland, A Church Distributed, in Longwood, Fla., says the prayer during the Easter Prayer Breakfast, Monday, April 14, 2014,  in the East Room of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama honored those killed in a weekend attack on two Jewish facilities in Kansas, saying no one should have to worry about their security while gathering with their fellow believers. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Of love and faith

The silly season arrives early. The world's on fire, and here we are, arguing over whether Barack Obama loves America, or loves it enough, and the political correspondents are parsing Scott Walker's answer to a question posed by the armchair theologians at The Washington Post, whether the president is a Christian.