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Illustration positing the possible national security actions of the presidential candidates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

National security reforms for the next president

“National security” is a highfalutin phrase for a problem that can be stated quite simply: We have enemies. What do we do about them? Since this is a matter of life and death, it’s worth asking: What national security policies can we expect the next commander in chief to implement?

Illustration on why union members should support Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why union workers should vote Republican

Unionized workers should get behind Donald Trump. Leaders of organized labor will see things differently, and that’s a tragedy for their members.

Illustration on Poland's resistance to EU dissemination of Syrian refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Bill Clinton’s affront to Poland

During a recent New Jersey campaign stop in support of his wife’s presidential bid, former President Bill Clinton suggested the people of Poland had decided democracy is too much trouble, and Poles want a Putin-type authoritarian leadership. His comments generated an immediate reaction from Poland’s government and the U.S.-based organization that represents about 10 million Polish-Americans.

Historian Craig Shirley tells Inside the Beltway that "President Reagan would have done everything Barack Obama is not doing" if he had been the president to take on the Islamic State. (Ronald Reagan Foundation & Presidential Library)

Drawing a conservative road map

Donald Trump is not Ronald Reagan, for whom we each worked and ardently supported because of his consistent, thoughtful, effective and eloquent conservatism. But Donald Trump is his own success story, and an American patriot committed to making America great again.

A Fix for Immigration Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fixing the immigration standoff

By and large, liberals favor amnesty for undocumented immigrants, followed by some kind of path, mostly undefined, to citizenship. Conservatives do not believe in rewarding crime — no amnesty, no citizenship — and favor deportation, where possible, or some form of punishment.

Illustration on Taiwan's efforts to fight disease by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

A partner in global health security

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) estimate released on April 21, 2004, a total of 774 lives were claimed in the SARS outbreak in 2003. Far beyond the nations where it claimed the most victims, SARS traumatized the world with vast economic disruptions, deeply impacting international trade and travel that year, and in the nervous months that followed.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Eugene, Ore., on May 6, 2016. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Negotiating the negatives

The 2016 election may go down in U.S. political history as a time when a majority of voters disliked both of their major party choices for president. Indeed, it’s hard to remember in the modern polling era when so many Americans have disapproved of even their own party’s presumptive nominees.

President Obama in Hanoi. (Associated Press)

Turning President Obama loose in Asia

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama hasn’t learned much in his seven years (and counting) in the White House, but he might have learned a little. He bowed to his Vietnamese hosts on arrival in Hanoi, but it wasn’t the infamous back-breaking 180-degree bow he gave to the despots of the Islamic world in Cairo.

Illustration on Reagan's policy impact on the Clinton economic "boom" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How Reaganomics saved Bill Clinton’s presidency

Should Republicans discard Ronald Reagan as a relevant political figure for today? Columnist Jonah Goldberg speaks for many conservative strategists when he writes: “Ronald Reagan is dead and he’s not coming back.” He was fine for his time, a great president, says Mr. Goldberg, but we have different problems today and shouldn’t keep invoking the Gipper when searching for presidents.

In this May 20, 2016 photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the National Rifle Association convention, in Louisville, Ky. Hillary Clinton has a message for Donald Trump: Bring it on. As Clinton's path to the Democratic nomination seems all-but-assured, friends, aides and supporters describe a candidate who is not only prepared to tune out Trump's increasingly direct attacks on her husband's personal indiscretions but believes they will eventually benefit her presidential aspirations. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Why Trump’s temporary Muslim ban is necessary

Gen. David Petraeus is now auditioning to become Hillary Clinton’s vice presidential pick. There’s really no other way to interpret his recent column in The Washington Post, slamming Donald Trump for proposing a temporary ban on Muslim immigration.

Ravages of Heroin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The other consequence of broken borders

“Lobos” has made another bust. Back in December, the K-9 dog Lobos and his human partner, Fayette County Texas Deputy Sheriff Sgt. Randy Thumann, made a routine stop on Interstate 10 and Lobos’ super nose turned up $4 million in liquid methamphetamine hidden in the vehicle of two Mexican nationals.

Liberal Doublespeak Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democratic doublespeak on minimum wage

Last week, the White House accepted a rare, bipartisan bill that addresses Puerto Rico’s dire fiscal condition. The territory is currently $70 billion in debt and has another $30 billion in unfunded pension liabilities. The bill would create a board to help restructure the territory’s debt obligations.

Illustration on Democrat misdirection on their record with women by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Real facts about the Democrats’ war on women

Why is the Clinton campaign obsessed about spinning what Donald Trump says about women? It’s because they’re desperate to have you not notice the damage President Obama and the Democratic Party are actually inflicting on women’s lives.

Illustration contrasting the European and American approaches to air travel security by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Lessons in the wake of EgyptAir

Thousands of missed flights. Mile-long waiting lines at airports. Then just when Americans are ready to scream over passenger screening delays, another aircraft goes down in the Middle East, hammering home the difficulty of balancing airline accessibility with security.

In this May 16, 2016, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waits to speak at a get out the vote event at La Gala in Bowling Green, Ky. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary’s enablers on the right

Is there anything more laughable than all the former members of the George W. Bush brain trust torching conservatives for getting behind Donald Trump? The stale complaint is that conservatives are tossing overboard their “core principles” when they get behind the fairly elected Republican nominee.

Related Articles

American Tradition Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The state of our tradition

Madrid -- One thing that conservatives overlook in their worldview is tradition. We favor limited government, free enterprise, the social issues, a strong defense, but as to the basic theme of tradition we slide over it. Russell Kirk, an important conservative thinker from the recent past, favored tradition and he wrote about it, but I cannot think of another prominent thinker in recent years who stressed it.

Ethanol a win-win

Your editorial, "When corn rules the road," (Web, May 22) overflows with misinformation propagated by oil companies that just want to keep Americans hooked on petroleum, with no regard for the environmental, energy-related or economic consequences of that addiction. A little independent research might have benefited your readers.

Muzzling attempt unconstitutional

Robert Knight rightly condemns the harassment of dissenters by left-wing attorneys general ("The dawn of totalitolerance," Web, May 22). As he notes, Virgin Islands Attorney General Claude Walker sent an incredibly burdensome subpoena to my employer, the Competitive Enterprise Institute, demanding "access to CEI's donor lists."

President Barack Obama looks to entrepreneurs on stage with him during a visit to the DreamPlex Coworking Space in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Secret deals, broken promises

Barack Obama is entitled to wonder why, after all he has done to keep their nuclear-weapons research intact and thriving, the mullahs in Iran are being so mean to him. Only the naive and foolish expect gratitude in politics, domestic or foreign, but still.

The HealthCare.gov website, where people can buy health insurance, is displayed on a laptop screen. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Bilking with Obamacare

Obamacare has been unpopular from the time it became law. Now President Obama's health-care scam has gone rogue, and maybe illegal. That's the conclusion of analysts both inside and outside of the federal government. They say the Obama administration is diverting taxpayer funds to save the president's scheme from collapse, if only until after he leaves office.

Abusing a right to privacy in the restroom

The first 10 amendments of U.S. Constitution codify rights of individual Americans. Those amendments (collectively referred to as the Bill of Rights) do not mention an explicit right to privacy. Nevertheless, the U.S. Supreme Court rationalized such a right and used it to justify it's controversial 1973 decision about abortion (Roe v. Wade).

The American dream. (Jonathon Gruenke/Daily Press via AP)

The shrinking American dream

The 21st century has not been kind to the American dream. The dream that brought millions of "the tired, the poor, the huddled masses yearning to breathe free" to America rests on the idea that each generation will have it better than the one before it.