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Illustration of Roger Ailes    The Washington Times

Roger Ailes’ exit, stage right

A major threat to the predominance of the Kultursmog in these United States passed away last week, but he had succeeded in what he set out to do, namely: to damage the left in America beyond any hope of recovery. Not many people recognize this, but it is nonetheless true.

Illustration on Turkish security attacks on American protesters in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When armed thugs come to town

Two times in two years, Turkish President Reycep Tayyip Erdogan visited our nation’s capital, and two times in two years his armed thugs attacked peaceful people on our streets. This time, his people sent nine Americans to the hospital.

Illustration on the benefits of biofuel by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cultivating homegrown energy solutions

With all the publicity around fracking, it’s easy to assume that America’s own domestic oil production is more than enough to fuel a growing economy. It certainly helps. But there’s no magic bullet that will ensure long-term American energy security.

Go player Ke Jie, center, speaks at a press conference after playing a match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. Ke Jie, the world's top-ranked Go player, started a three-round showdown on Tuesday against AlphaGo, which beat a South Korean Go master in a five-round showdown last year. (AP Photo/Peng Peng)

The great crawl of China

The world has watched with amazement as China sprints toward its goal of becoming an advanced economy. Average annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 10 percent over the last 20 years has raised hundreds of millions of its citizens out of poverty and transformed China into an economic powerhouse.

State Licensing is a Roadblock to Success Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thriving without a license

What do auctioneers, butter tasters, florists, hair braiders, makeup artists and taxidermists all have in common? They need permission from the government, in the form of an occupational license, to do their jobs.

President Trump. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A boffo performance on the road

- The Washington Times

The Donald finally catches a break. His trip to the Middle East was planned weeks ago, long before the sacking of James Comey and the media transformation of the voluble sackee from goat to hero. The opportunity to get out of Dodge arrived just in time.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of May 23, 2017

Population death spiral

It is hard to succeed if everyone is leaving. Some of the former communist countries are suffering from a population death spiral, with double-digit population declines over the last 25 years, as can be seen in the enclosed table.

In this May 18, 1971 file photo, political consultant Roger Ailes, who died last week, is shown in his office in New York. From communications guru and TV producer to Chairman-CEO of Fox News Channel, Ailes' used a "fair and balanced" branding approach, targeted at viewers who believed other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, displayed a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivered them with "unvarnished truth." Associated Press photo

The genius of Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came.

Illustration on the notion of government subsidy of nuclear power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why nuclear power subsidies must end

Should utility bills and taxes be used to subsidize money-losing nuclear power plants so they can compete with renewable energy and low-cost natural gas?

Even the Walls have Ears Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A conversation with Condoleezza Rice

On Wednesday, I sat down with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to discuss her new book, “Democracy: Stories From the Long Road to Freedom.” The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.

Un-Happy Meal From High Minimum Wage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How a CEO misapprehends the minimum wage

Last week, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg made headlines for her Mother’s Day post calling for a minimum wage increase. “It’s long past time,” she claimed, “to raise the federal minimum wage.”

Related Articles

Illustration on mankind's friend, carbon dioxide by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for nixing the Paris Agreement

The United States should withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement. For too long, well-meaning policymakers have been misled by propaganda, masquerading as science, that more atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) will harm the planet. Paris represents the culmination of this campaign.

Pentagon under no 'green' illusions

Rebecca Hagelin's "Peace through diversity?" op-ed (Web, May 21) article requires a response. I'm just a visitor here in Maryland and happened to read Ms. Hagelin's piece. Though not an expert, I had to wonder about the wisdom of her conclusions. She lumps diversity and global warming together as absurd world views that result in "ridiculous and dangerous military strategy."

Trump is not Nixon

The anti-Trump crowd is claiming that President Trump has, like Richard Nixon, committed an impeachable offense. Thus pressure is being applied to force his resignation.

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump, leave the White House as they embark on Mr. Trump's first overseas tour to the Middle East. (Associated Press)

A budget to encourage growth

Donald Trump is a different kind of president and his spending plan for the nation is a different kind of budget. With U.S. debt at $20 trillion (that's with a T, not a mere B), it's a budget that offers a way off the path to insolvency. With Democrats determined to thwart his presidency, to tear every proposal to shreds, he will get a test of his leadership to win over spendthrift Republicans.

At midlife, an accounting

Even those of us who have not yet had a midlife crisis know what to expect when one arrives because lifestyle magazines heavily promote them. They may show up in office dress insisting on a debit and credit analyses of success and failure. You will probably get pats on the back if you survive this. But they can also erupt as a dark cloud of second (or 92nd) thoughts about a partner contracted for ever and ever in an earlier decade.

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump, leave the White House as they embark on Mr. Trump's first overseas tour to the Middle East. (Associated Press)

How much does CNN hate Trump? 93% of coverage is negative

For the youngsters out there, once upon a time, CNN was pretty much down the middle. The fledgling network covered news -- real news, not fake news -- and worked hard to be on site wherever news was happening. When something happened, that was the place to go.

People applaud following a moment of silence for the victims of the Manchester bomb blast, outside the Palais du Festival in Cannes, southern France, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. An apparent suicide bomber attacked an Ariana Grande concert as it ended Monday night, killing over a dozen people among a panicked crowd of young concertgoers, in Manchester, England. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Milo erupts on Ariana as 'too stupid,' too 'pro-Islam'

- The Washington Times

Milo Yiannopoulos, conservative writer, went on a rant against Ariana Grande on his Facebook account, calling out the pop star for her naive views of Islam. But the slam is perhaps a bit unfair. After all, Grande isn't the policy-maker for open borders and red-carpet roll-outs to migrants from terror hot spots.

In this photo taken May 19, 2017, a GPO worker stacks copies of "Analytical Perspectives Budget of the U.S. Government Fiscal Year 2018" onto a pallet at the U.S. Government Publishing Office's (GPO) plant in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump budget a good step in pro-taxpayer direction

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is proposing in his "New Foundation for American Greatness" plan some of the largest cuts to government programs the country's seen in a decade, including a provision that will reign in debt and cut spending by $3.6 trillion over the next ten years. Of course, the left is already crying.

Armed police patrol the streets near to Manchester Arena in central Manchester, England, Tuesday May 23, 2017. An apparent suicide bomber attacked an Ariana Grande concert as the performance ended, killing 22 people as the audience filed out of the arena and sending frantic parents searching for their children amid a panicked crowd of young concertgoers. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira)

ISIS, radical Islam rear at Ariana Grande concert

- The Washington Times

Twenty-two people were killed and another 59 injured in what British Prime Minister Theresa May is calling an "appalling terrorist attack" at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester Arena. And it wasn't long after that ISIS, surprise, surprise, claimed responsibility.