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Former US President Barack Obama is awarded the German Media Prize 2016 in Baden-Baden, Germany, Thursday, May 25, 2017.(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Cutting Taxes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A rare chance to boost small businesses

Among the many lessons our current leadership should learn from Ronald Reagan’s effective governance are his initiatives to revitalize the American economy. Most relevant today is remembering President Reagan’s tax cuts and corporate tax reform of 1986 enacted with bipartisan support that produced sustained economic growth.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a sword and sways with traditional dancers during a welcome ceremony at Murabba Palace, in Riyadh. Trump and his entourage were treated to a traditional all-male Saudi sword dance. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the Saudi king, Trump swayed side to side and briefly joined the groove. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump’s vision for the Middle East

President Trump arrived in the Arabian desert hoping to realign the politics of the Middle East in the aftermath of a failed Obama policy. For eight years, President Obama tilted in the direction of Iran, believing that the influence of the Shia could balance Sunni dominance.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security’s Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

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People react while visiting the flower tributes at St Ann's square in central Manchester, England Friday May 26 2017. More than 20 people were killed in an explosion following a Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena late Monday evening. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira)

The left's dangerous dance with terrorists

- The Washington Times

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly went on national television recently and made this somewhat chilling remark: "If [Americans] knew what I knew about terrorism, [they'd] never leave the house in the morning." It's just that kind of frightening head thump on reality that makes one wonder: So why are so many leftists in this nation heck-bent on keeping borders open?

FILE - This Tuesday Sept. 27, 2016 file photo shows Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, Chief Justice Roger Gregory during an interview in his office in Richmond, Va. Gregory will preside over the full 15-judge court will hear the a lawsuit challenging President Trump's travel ban. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

4th Circuit's Russian roulette roll of the border

- The Washington Times

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit shot down yet another attempt by President Donald Trump to control and limit travelers to this country from terror hot spots in the world. It's like the panel just can't get enough of Russian roulette -- the game that's basically being played with America's border security and the open door approach the left wants to keep intact, regardless of terror and security concerns.

Facebook CEO and Harvard dropout Mark Zuckerberg delivers the commencement address at Harvard University commencement exercises, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Cambridge, Mass., (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Mark Zuckerberg's brainless world tax to pay all for being born

- The Washington Times

Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder of Facebook, has made his money -- his billions of dollars in a short span of time -- and now? Now, he wants yours. How? He pitched a global tax idea to Harvard graduations, a way of giving every man, woman and child a set amount of money for the simple reason of being born.

The 'unreal' reality of human relationships

Fans of the best-selling author Haruki Murakami maybe understand it best: Great books are worth the wait. It's been three years since "Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage" appeared in English. Mr. Murakami's newest novel, "Killing Commendatore," was released in Japan on Feb. 24, and if history serves as a guide, we will likely have to wait over a year for the English translation.

Fund service-year programs

America today faces a staggering reality: 5.5 million young adults are currently neither in school nor working. This is a gross underutilization of a vast pool of untapped talent and energy, resources that could be used to build communities across the nation and abroad. Service-year programs such as AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps and YouthBuild provide opportunities for Americans to gain workforce skills and provide creative solutions to address many issues that face communities today. As racial, economic, religious and political division is on the rise, this is not a time to cut funding to programs that help to build and strengthen communities. Instead it is time to support those initiatives so that all participants benefit.

Save Venezuela

The international community must save the Venezuelan people from corrupt Nicolas Maduro's communist dictatorship. The free world and President Trump must help through sanctions and diplomacy to prevent total economic disaster and the massacre of Venezuelans by Cuban military and Venezuelan security forces.

First lady Melania Trump and President Donald Trump arrive to greet French President Emmanuel Macron at the U.S. Embassy, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Brussels. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How to strangle a government

The Trump administration is coming together slowly, with many important positions still without bodies after almost six months gone by since the inauguration, and the pace is not likely to quicken soon. The Democrats have no interest in helping, since the bureaucracy is mostly staffed with Democrats. Without strong Republican leadership in place at the top the mice can play and wreak partisan mischief.

A Christian high school in Maryland is defending its decision to ban pregnant 18-year-old Maddi Runkles from her graduation ceremony next month, claiming she behaved immorally. (FOX5)

Give Maddi Runkles her due

This is the season of pride, hope and ambition. Thousands of young men and women will walk across a stage in stadiums, arenas and auditoriums to get a coveted reward for 12 years of pain, strain and hard work. The graduates, with their parents and teachers, can rightly take a bow for genuine accomplishment.

Republican candidate for Montana's only U.S. House seat, Greg Gianforte, sits in a vehicle near a Discovery Drive building Wednesday, May 24, 2017, in Bozeman, Mont. A reporter said Gianforte "body-slammed" him Wednesday, the day before the special election. (Freddy Monares/Bozeman Daily Chronicle via AP)

Greg Gianforte's teachable moment: Don't body-slam reporters

- The Washington Times

Greg Gianforte, Montana's Republican hopeful for the congressional seat vacated by Ryan Zinke -- who's now President Donald Trump's secretary of Interior -- had a little bit of an altercation with one of the reporters who questioned him at his campaign headquarters in Bozeman. And given the special election is Thursday, one might say the unpleasantries came at a quite inopportune time. Moreover, altercation is probably an understatement.