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Federal Land Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grinding westerners under the federal boot

The federal government owns an estimated one-third of all the land in the United States. But this is only a rough estimate, because even the federal government does not actually know how much land it controls.

Illustration on the contrasting media coverage of Hillary and Trump by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The apoplectic liberals

- The Washington Times

Is it journalistic malpractice to quote each side of the argument and leave it to readers to draw their own conclusions?

A study in nuclear contrast

Astudy in contrast: North Korea is killing itself to get an atomic bomb; Kazakhstan is rich because it gave its nukes away.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we’re getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It’s a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Illustration on two possible economic futures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Liars, statistics and politics

This presidential season Americans have been treated to the usual outrageous campaign promises and extraordinary candidate alibis about past transgressions, but those pale in comparison to claims about gains in family incomes served up by the Obama administration last week.

Fifteen years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 2,976 American flags were displayed in memory of each person who died. Families of the victims say they have waited long enough and want legislation granting them the right to sue Saudi officials who they say are culprits. (Associated Press)

Americanism over transnationalism

Throughout this presidential campaign we’ve heard many liberals and neoconservatives carp against the nationalism espoused by Donald Trump and condemn how nationalism continues to resonate among tens of millions of regular Americans. Elitists and media messengers likewise express horror when Mr. Trump announces that in all matters, be they domestic or foreign, his policy and attitude will be “America first.”

Illustration on Obama's exit before the consequences by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

War clouds are gathering

This summer, President Obama was often golfing. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were promising to let the world be. The end of summer seemed sleepy, the world relatively calm.

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2016 file photo, handguns are displayed at the Smith & Wesson booth at the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show in Las Vegas. Nearly two-thirds of Americans expressed support for stricter gun laws, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll released Saturday, July 23, 2016. A majority of poll respondents oppose banning handguns. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Why millennials are skeptical of gun control

For the mediaocracy and pundit class, determining the opinions of millennials on all sorts of topics is the great 21st-century parlor game. And it seems that nothing confuses them more — or upsets them, for that matter — than when forced to confront millennial attitudes about guns.

Illustration on Obama Cabinet members violations of the Hatch Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Partisan politics in the Cabinet

The Obama administration repeatedly allows senior officials to unlawfully meddle in politics without being held accountable. In just the latest incident, Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Julian Castro in July was found to have violated a law designed to ensure that federal officials work on behalf of all Americans, not their political party.

Oklahoma Justice Reform Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Modernizing the justice system

As governor of Oklahoma, I’ve seen first-hand the profound impact incarceration has had on our families, children, communities and state.

Friendly Octopus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Old friends and presidential politics

Sitting at a bar on the outskirts of Pittsburgh before a reunion party for the class of 1959 of a nearby suburban high school, I heard the same thing from two people entering the restaurant: “Um, these people are really old. Are you sure we’re at the right reunion?”

Red Tape Attack on Coatings Industry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rolling out the red tape

Here’s one thing everyone can agree on: Federal regulatory and international tax policy implications can be as exciting as, well, watching paint dry.

Illustration on 800 persons being granted citizenship rather than deportation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The U.S. immigration system in chaos

Germans proving they’re not sheeple are rejecting their mass-immigration-promoting ruling party in elections. The U.S. immigration system, in chaos, “mistakenly” gives citizenship to 800 immigrants ordered deported. Two foreign-born Islamists go on terror rampages in the United States.

Related Articles

President Barack Obama greets people in the audience during a ceremony East Room of the White House, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Washington, after awarding the 2015 National Medals of Arts and 2015 National Humanities Medals. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The president's farewell tour

Sarah Bernhardt, the French superstar at the end of a career as "the most famous actress the world has ever known," famously set out on a farewell tour that was so successful she repeated it, several times.

Rep. Lewis deserves medal

The Philadelphia Liberty Medal is a highly reputable prize. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia is an excellent choice for this year's recipient ("John Lewis awarded Liberty Medal for civil rights work," web, Sept. 19). The prize has an established history and Mr. Lewis is an effective congressman.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign stop in Orlando, Fla., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016.  (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

Answers for Hillary

Hillary Clinton is smart -- she has the academic credentials to prove it -- but she can't figure out why she isn't scoring above 50 percent in the public-opinion polls. Life on the hustings just ain't fair.

Call terrorism by its name

When will terrorist actions actually be called terrorism by the leaders of this country? After the explosion in New York City, Gov. Cuomo stated that there was no evidence of international terrorism connected to it.

Protesters surround a police vehicle in Charlotte, N.C. on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Authorities used tear gas to disperse protesters in an overnight demonstration that broke out Tuesday after Keith Lamont Scott was fatally shot by an officer at an apartment complex. (Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer via AP)

Rioting in North Carolina

Black lives matter, and they matter so much that everyone, black or white, is responsible for protecting them. That begins with demanding that "demonstrators" and "protesters" pay a little respect to the black lives they say they honor.

No purse from this sow

Fellow Democrats, wake up. There is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- in either the soul or the track record of Hillary Clinton that should make voters enthusiastic. Virtually every day a new scandal surfaces, and the rumors are that the really big scandals have yet to emerge ("Millennial voters spurning Clinton, but not for GOP," Web, Sept. 19).

Liberals' refugee penance

This week the United States welcomed its 10,000th Syrian refugee. There are 30,000 more waiting in line. This helping of distressed human beings is a big thrill to confused Democrats. It doesn't matter that last Sunday bombs were set off in New York and New Jersey, or that nine people were sliced with a cleaver in Minnesota. And what was the glue that connected these events? Muslim hatred of western values.

President Barack Obama speaks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum at The Plaza Hotel in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Working overtime against the economy

Barack Obama is worried about the legacy he'll bequeath to history in just three months. Like all presidents he wants to be remembered as a good president if not a great president, but he keeps doing things that will render the memory of his presidency as something forgettable between the work of Chester Alan Arthur and Jimmy Carter.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Scorched Earth: Restoring the Country After Obama'

"Scorched Earth: Restoring the Country After Obama" by Michael Savage is just what you'd expect from the stalwart radio talk show host -- a no-holds-barred, tell-it-like-it-is recounting of leftist-controlled life under the Obama administration and warning of the potential dire decline of America if such administration policies continue under a Clinton presidency.