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Illustration on Hillary Clinton's economic plans by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary pleads for four more years

“People are working harder and longer just to keep their heads above water. And to deal with the costs, the everyday costs, the costs of basics like childcare and prescription drugs that are too high. College is getting more expensive every day. And wages are still too low and inequality is too great. Good jobs in this country are still too hard to come by.”

Illustration on Chinese drugs coming through Mexico by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Drugs and thugs

On June 9, The New York Times ran this headline on Page A1: “Drug That Killed Prince Is Making Mexican Cartels Richer, U.S. Says.” The first line of the story reads, “The drug that killed Prince has become a favorite of Mexican cartels because it is extremely potent, popular in the United States — and immensely profitable, American officials say.”

Eco-Terrorism Damage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Greenpeace under fire

Governments and courts around the world are finally cracking down on the eco-terrorist organization Greenpeace. The crackdown, which is long overdue, couldn’t happen to a more misguided bunch of people.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The bad moon rising over Hillary

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton won’t be able to say she didn’t see the bad moon rising. Donald Trump gave her a blistering introduction this week to Presidential Politics 102, which differs in a remarkable way from Politics 101, which she encountered in her first attempt in 2008 and before that as the managing partner in Bubba’s two campaigns.

Illustration on the Obama administration's plans for the fossil fuel industry by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Why Exxon is not the problem

For more than 200 years, the American birthright has provided protection against the threat that one’s head might hang on London Bridge — or the Key Bridge, if you prefer — for disagreeing with the government.

Illustration on the struggle for Kurdish independence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Kurdish independence matters

If the next U.S. president wants “to put America first” he might look toward the Kurdish north of Iraq. There the long-standing question of Kurdish independence scares Washington into a tired reflex that quashes important U.S. interests beneath an unwavering policy to promote the fiction of a unified Iraq.

Illustration on the Republican alternative to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ryan’s Obamacare liberation

Paul Ryan’s House Republican Task Force on health policy reform released on Wednesday the Republican majority’s unified plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans should not be shy about making this reform the centerpiece of this year’s election.

Illustration on the dangers of Obama, the ideologue by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ideologues make for dangerous politicians

Hillary Clinton is a seasoned liberal politician, but one with few core beliefs. Her positions on subjects such as gay marriage, free-trade agreements, the Keystone XL pipeline, the Iraq War, the Assad regime in Syria and the use of the term “radical Islam” all seem to hinge on what she perceives 51 percent of the public to believe on any given day.

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2013, file photo, a student walks across the Lawn in front of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., while the Rotunda was undergoing renovation. Amid scrutiny from Congress and campus activists, colleges across the country are under growing pressure to reveal the financial investments made using their endowments. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Why we need charter public colleges

In 2014 state community colleges and four-year colleges taught more than 13 million students, or about 76 percent of all college students in the nation. But these public institutions are in serious trouble.

Strong Families Make a Strong America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The father factor

Father’s Day has come and gone. The grills are turned off and the gift ties have been put away. The leisurely family time is over and we are all back to the daily grind. But there is much work to do to strengthen America’s families.

Illustration on ineffectual Obama administration strategies against ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama’s disintegrating strategy

Throughout his presidency, Barack Obama has maintained his willful ignorance of the fact that weakness against terrorists abroad, coupled with weakness against them at home, add up to more than the sum of their parts. To defeat terrorists, we need to have policies at home and strategies abroad that are integrated and support each other.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks about the economy at Fort Hayes Vocational School Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Factors that elected Bill could now defeat Hillary

Hillary Clinton knows better than anyone the economy’s weakness and its political danger. The reason George H.W. Bush lost a close race to a political outsider with glaring liabilities 24 years ago was public perception that the economy was weak.

Related Articles

'Plus' ruling racist

Now the highest court in the land says racism is perfectly OK in school admissions — so long as it's used for "positive" purposes ("Supreme Court upholds affirmative action 'plus' policy," Web, June 23). But if you use race to accept one person for a limited number of slots, you're automatically using race to reject another person, and that's not "positive" at all. In schools, only academic credentials should matter.

Media double standard

In 2008, presidential candidate Barack Obama booted reporters from three newspapers — The Washington Times, the New York Post and the Dallas Morning News — off his campaign plane. In their place, Mr. Obama seated journalists from Jet, Ebony and Glamour magazines. His campaign said the move was due to a limited number of plane seats. The mainstream press said nothing at all.

Sit-in not probem solver

For Rep. John Lewis, Georgia Democrat, gun control is a matter of debate, just as civil rights was in the 1960s. But is a sit-in on gun violence really what we need?

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking at a fundraiser for Washington Gov. Jay Inslee at the Washington State Convention Center, Friday, June 24, 2016, in Seattle, WA. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama's takes a licking

The week was not a good one for President Obama and his shriveling legacy. Mr. Obama, who promised to transform America into a country that he and Michele could be proud of, wanted to build the legacy by bringing in millions of illegal immigrants who, when transformed into voters, would insure a Democratic majority for as far as a patriot's eye could see.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Junkyards, Gearheads, and Rust: Salvaging the Automotive Past'

This unexpectedly interesting book is all about cars -- after they die and go to automotive purgatory to await the crusher. The author, an assistant professor of History at Auburn, who confesses to a lifelong passion for both cars and junkyards, is a man who never met a junkyard he didn't like.

The flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, top, and the flag of England fly above a souvenir stand on Westminster Bridge following yesterday's EU referendum result, London, Saturday, June 25, 2016. Britain voted to leave the European Union after a bitterly divisive referendum campaign. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)

The world turned upside down

The elites across the world had a dreadful weekend. Britain's historic goodbye to Europe -- and it was indeed historic -- reverberated in capitals on every continent. The elites, the people who run things (or think they do and who certainly think they should) were told, in language plain and unsparing: "You stink!"

Illustration on affirmative action in universities by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Quotas by any other name

Reverse discrimination is alive and well in the United States, judging by what transpired at the Supreme Court last Thursday and a bill that recently passed New York's state assembly.

FILE - In this May 6, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Eugene, Ore. The city of Eugene plans to bill the Donald Trump campaign nearly $100,000 to pay for costs associated with last month's visit. Police Chief Pete Kerns said in an email Wednesday, June 22, 2016, that overtime compensation for police officers totaled $78,000 while firefighters and other city employees racked up another $10,000 in OT. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

There's hope for the 'unknown'

Donald Rumsfeld, the former secretary of Defense, has given the Republicans a fighting slogan to appeal to voters who can't quite cotton to Donald Trump but who sure can't vote for Hillary Clinton. Mr. Rumsfeld says he's voting for the Donald because he's more comfortable with a "known unknown" than with a "known known."

Obama's allegiance questionable

President Obama and his administration recently took major steps to protect radical Muslims. They even went so far as to use extreme measures to change the Orlando terrorist's expression of allegiance to Allah to an expression of allegiance God in telephone-conversation transcripts. This is an insult to Judeo-Christian religions. Fortunately Mr. Obama failed in this instance.

Price of 'free stuff'

If you want to see how the federal government under a President Hillary Clinton would look and act, look no further than the people's republic of California. Under a progressive legislature and governor, California is building a $68-billion high-speed train from the metropolis of nowhere to the far side of podunk city.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center, joined by, from left, House Assistant Minority Leader James Clyburn of S.C., Rep. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., and Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 23, 2016, after House Democrats ended their sit-in protest.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sitting down on the job

Disgruntled members of Congress have rarely caught the point of what the public thinks of Congress quite like the Democratic sit-in in the House of Representatives. "Sitting on their ample rumps" is exactly what most voters think Congress usually does. The characterization is sometimes unfair, but this time the rump makes the point.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Little Red Chairs'

Someone once said whether history remembers you as a rebel or a freedom fighter depends on whether you lose or win. Whether the same applies to a dictator is open to question. Edna O'Brien seems to be playing with these ideas in her new, complex novel, "The Little Red Chairs."