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Colin Kaepernick (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The killer wind from Hurricane Donald

- The Washington Times

They said it couldn’t be done, and even if it could, Donald Trump wouldn’t be the man to do it. But a fresh wind from somewhere is blowing through the jungle where the timid, the fearful and the politically correct cower in the shade of the no-no tree.

Illustration on government regulatory obstacles to infrastructure construction by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The national infrastructure dilemma

President-elect Donald Trump has proposed as one of his legislative priorities a $1 trillion national infrastructure program (“Trump’s infrastructure program,” Nov. 28).

Illustration on Boeing's coming future under a Trump administration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The art of the Boeing deal

- The Washington Times

Consider President-elect Donald Trump’s tweet threatening to cancel Boeing’s contract for Air Force One the first a shot across the bow in an upcoming battle with the aerospace company.

Illustration on Saudi Arabia's growing troubles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s uncertainties

OPEC member’s decision last week to cut oil output won’t help Saudi Arabia in the long term. The kingdom problems run far deeper and even at $50 a barrel, it will face a large deficit requiring more borrowing and subsidies cuts that will bring more pain on a population accustomed to easy life.

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, President-elect Donald Trump walks with CKE Restaurants CEO Andy Puzder from Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Trump is expected to add another wealthy business person and elite donor to his Cabinet, with fast food executive Andrew Puzder as Labor secretary. In the background is Vice President-elect Mike Pence. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A pro-jobs Labor Secretary

Andy Puzder knows what works and doesn’t work in the real marketplace for labor.

In this Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents pass a section of border wall in Hidalgo, Texas. The idea of a concrete wall spanning the entire 1,954-mile southwest frontier collides head-on with multiple realities, like a looping Rio Grande, fierce local resistance, and cost. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Taking back the border

Donald Trump may have shocked the world when he was elected president of the United States, but Latino voters proved to be an even bigger surprise. Election Day exit polling showed that Mr. Trump gained 2 percent more Latino voters than Mitt Romney did in 2012, winning a total 29 percent of 13 million Latino voters.

Illustration on the Obama legacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Time

Assessing the Obama legacy

In his 2016 State of the Union address, President Obama summarized his achievements. That same night, the White House issued a press release touting Mr. Obama’s accomplishments.

Choose Your Fuel at the Pump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rethinking the ethanol standard

President-elect Donald Trump cruised to victory promising to get rid of the mandate to buy health insurance. While he’s at it, how about getting rid of the mandate to buy ethanol?

Chattering Filibuster Teeth Unhinged Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Disabling Senate filibuster abuse

Voters might justifiably assume that having now gained control of Congress and the White House, Republicans have complete power to enact all campaign promises in the last election. But without changes to the filibuster, Senate minority Democrats can still block Republican reforms.

Europe's Recent Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s epochal elections

“The novelty and magnitude of Europe’s predicament make it difficult to understand, tempting to overlook, and nearly impossible to predict. Europe marches us all into terra incognita.” That’s how I closed an article 10 years ago on the topic of Islam’s future in Europe.

The key to engaging with Hispanics

I was reminded this week of 1980, when my father — who was the founder of a national organization representing the interests of Hispanic business owners — got involved with the presidential election in order to support Ronald Reagan.

Illustration on drug use in America by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

How to end America’s drug crisis

As President Trump prepares to confront multiple crises, including national security, foreign policy, and immigration, another crisis looms. It kills tens of thousands of young Americans annually, inflicting unparalleled suffering on American families.

Illustration on matching tax cuts with cuts in government spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A model for making tax cuts work

Before President-elect Donald Trump has fully fleshed out his policy agenda, House Republicans are already planning to slam through Congress their own program of repealing Obamacare, repealing regulations Barack Obama issued in the last 60 legislative days of his administration, and enacting substantial tax cuts.

Hirohito Flag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The incomplete legacy of Pearl Harbor

After 75 years, there are still so many stories about the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on Dec. 7, 1941, including the tragic loss of more than 2,300 American servicemen, the destruction of 18 ships, the loss of over 150 aircraft and even the element of surprise on that Sunday morning.

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Dems' disappointment spin-out

After each of President Obama's election victories, I and many other conservatives who had voted against him were very disappointed. I believed Obama would be destructive to our national security and military might, while spawning violent protests between citizens and against law enforcement. I believed he demeaned many Christians for 'clinging' to their faith in the Bible. I opposed his agenda.

Reconsider "Mad Dog" pick

President-elect Donald Trump should rethink his selection of retired Marine Corps Gen. James N. "Mad Dog" Mattis as his Secretary of Defense ("Donald Trump demands waiver for Gen. James Mattis to serve as Pentagon chief," Web, Dec. 6). In spite of his stellar military service record, Mattis is not qualified to serve as defense secretary.

FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2016 file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol agent drives near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Sunland Park, N.M. U.S. immigration authorities caught barely half the people who illegally entered the country from Mexico last year, according to an internal Department of Homeland Security report that offers one of the most detailed assessments of U.S. border security ever compiled. The report found far fewer people are attempting to get into the U.S. than a decade ago and that 54 percent of those who tried were caught in the year ending Sept. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)

The wall first, then the rest

Every new president comes to Washington with two lists. The first is a list of things he would like to do. That's his wish list. He knows he won't get to some of the items. Those are the things that are possible but not probable in his first four years. This is the list he keeps to himself. The second list is much shorter, the things he must get done to make everything else possible. That's his "must-do list."

Various dishes of General Tso's chicken are depicted her in this screen capture from a Google search. The inventor of the iconic Chinese dish, Peng Chang-kuei, died on Nov. 30 at the age of 98 from pneumonia.

The day of the generals

The day of the generals has dawned bright and clear upon us, at least in Washington. Donald Trump, who was educated early at a junior military academy, obviously appreciates officers with lots of gold braid on their chests and sleeves. He has put several generals in his Cabinet and in his inner circle, including even an attorney general.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Conclave'

Doings that occur behind closed doors always fascinate and especially if they have to do with politics or power, which is one reason why document leaks always hit the headlines. The allure of secrecy and the thrill of leak-like revelations of secret discussion are the engines of "Conclave," Robert Harris' latest novel, which takes readers into the Vatican for the election of a pope.

Illustration on Trump and the "blue collar" American by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump and the art of getting it done

- The Washington Times

President-elect Donald Trump is already getting so much done so seamlessly that he's conveying the attitude of Reese Witherspoon's character, Elle Woods in "Legally Blonde," when she informs a skeptic that she's been admitted to Harvard Law School: "What, like it's hard?"

President-elect Donald Trump speaks to members of the media in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Words to the wise

Among the mainstream media's manifest faults is the high regard in which it holds itself. The average "journalist," as uptown newspapermen want to be called in a culture where titles get ever more extravagant, is a forgiving fellow, and never more forgiving than when he confronts his own errors (if any). Being a journalist in Washington means never having to say you're sorry.

Ready for real change

We conservatives fear it may be too late to be delivered from prevaricating presidents, and capricious, sanctimonious bureaucrats who believe only in the tax-and-spend public sector and hold the wealth-generating private sector to be evil.

Illustration by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Whole lot of shakin' goin' on

The little red school house, famous in the lore of the early days of the republic, is long gone, but the memory of it is a nostalgic reminder of how the education of children was once the responsibility of the town. As public education has grown into extensive public school systems in towns big and small, the schoolhouse is no longer the source of civic pride.