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Donald Trump confounds the Gaffe Patrol

- The Washington Times

The Japanese Zero was one of the most famous fighter planes in the South Pacific, bedeviling American pilots in the early days of World War II. The Zero was quick and nimble, darting from the clouds to inflict death and mayhem, and the Zero hit many a target.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop at Old National Events Plaza, Thursday, April 28, 2016, in Evansville, Ind. (Denny Simmons/Evansville Courier & Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

The final rebuke of Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump has a shot at reconfiguring the electoral map — putting traditionally blue states like Pennsylvania and Wisconsin into play, with his working-class, industrial appeal.

Culture and Tradition of the Silk Road Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tracing the modern Silk Road

This week the Johns Hopkins University in Washington is hosting a major regional conference on the historic Silk Road. The “Trans-Caspian East-West Trade & Transit Corridor” event co-hosted by the embassies of Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan and Turkey brings together officials from the United States and the region with over 50 major international companies and academic leaders to brainstorm the strengthening of regional integration.

Artist's rendering of the Haymarket Square explosion.

Now it’s May Day every day

One hundred years ago Sunday (May 1, 1916) the “greatest strike of laboring men in the history of the United States” took place, according to a front-page story in the Washington [D. C.] Herald newspaper. Some two million workers struck on May Day, far outdistancing the strife that typified the late-19th century when the day was a code word for industrial violence. The Haymarket Square protest in Chicago in the wake of strikes on May Day 1886 was the most notorious, with a bomb explosion that killed 11 and wounded more than a hundred.

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. responds to a question from the audience during a town hall at Gaston Hall at Georgetown University in Washington, Wednesday, April 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Renegotiating Puerto Rico’s debt and Trumpian anger

A majority of Americans aren’t enthusiastic about a potential President Trump. Nonetheless, anger with the political establishment about political games and backroom deals, about insiders’ arrogance, and about fear that taxpayers will end up largely being saddled with the costs of these antics seems to be a driving force behind the pro-Trump movement.

A Trump forerunner who met the challenge of racial equality

Many conservatives and Republicans across the country are worried about the possibility that their presidential nominee could be Donald Trump, a man who initially dithered over rejecting the support of former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, someone who has routinely retweeted hateful words from white supremacists.

Anti-abortion activists rally in Austin, Texas, to condemn the use in medical research of tissue samples obtained from aborted fetuses. (Associated Press)

Planned Parenthood’s fetal parts practices

Planned Parenthood, a vastly profitable, tax-subsidized consortium that performs more than 300,000 abortions a year, is the target of five different congressional investigations. Last September its president, Cecile Richards, categorically denied accusations by the House Oversight Committee that the organization profits from the sale of fetal tissue.

Share the Neighborhood Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Mr. Rogers Doctrine

Barack Obama last week visited Saudi Arabia, an unusual nation with which the United States has had a relationship that can be accurately characterized as both strategic and strange — and one that is now severely strained. To understand how we got to this juncture requires at least a smattering of modern history.

Trump Campaign Reboot Button Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump and the art of the reboot

It’s a good thing for Donald Trump that he got a boost from the recent primary in his home state of New York, because otherwise, he had a rough few weeks. He damaged his credibility as a candidate by making a string of confusing and ill-advised statements about punishing women who have an abortion and expressing scant concern about nuclear proliferation

Lead, follow or get out of the way

The terror attacks in Paris of just five months ago brought to the fore the following question: Is it going to take the equivalent of the Paris bombings here before President Obama takes decisive action against the Islamic State? After the attacks in Brussels, the question is now more relevant. The president has yet to act decisively against the Islamic State.

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop at Old National Events Plaza, Thursday, April 28, 2016, in Evansville, Ind. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Looking for Trump's world

Donald Trump's foreign policy speech this week astonished some of his snarky critics who were surprised that he had a foreign policy, beyond building a wall on the Rio Grande and sending the bill for it to Mexico. What they got was what he has been saying for months, in coherent language more easily committed to the teleprompter that presidents and prime ministers rely on.

Tubman is Tubman, gun or no

I found "No whitewash for Harriet Tubman" (Web, April 24) very interesting. Feelings of understanding and conflict coursed through me as I, too, contemplated which image of Harriet Tubman should grace the front of the $20 bill. While taking the time to think truly about the actual significance of this overall historical honor of Ms. Tubman, my African-American pride started to take effect.

BOOK REVIEW: 'In Other Words'

It's not unknown for a novelist -- even an acclaimed novelist -- to write in a foreign language. Joseph Conrad and Vladimir Nabokov wrote in English though their first languages were Polish and Russian respectively. Irishman Samuel Beckett switched from English to French. Now Jhumpa Lahiri, a prize-winning author of short stories and novels in English, has decided to follow suit, abandoning English in favor of Italian.

Taiwan can mediate

The tensions in Asia are bound to undergo changes ("An American 'wall of missiles' to deter China" Web, April 25), but there is a mediator available to ease these in the South China Sea. Instead of positioning the arsenal platforms to counter China, Washington should take a close look at Taiwan's role within the region and determine how Taiwan can unravel the dangerous escalation in U.S.-China relations.

A plate of food is shown with candles and wine. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Taking Nanny to dinner

Expanding waistlines are the price Americans pay for the horn of plenty. The nanny lurking in the shadow of big government reckoned that she can help the greedy shed the extra pounds by ordering restaurants to offer menus that clearly label nutritional content. Experience shows it probably won't work, and coaxing diners to order smaller portions might.

Use captured funds wisely

The war against the Islamic State continues unabated, with the bad guys losing 1,500 to 2,000 fighters per month, according to the Pentagon. In fact, the terrorist group has reportedly lost so many front-line fighters that it is no longer able to replace dead soldiers one-for-one, instead only replacing 25 percent. We have also reportedly been successful in destroying a large chunk of the Islamic State's oil business.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop Wednesday, April 27, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

A 'presidential' Trump

Donald Trump declared victory in the wake of his impressive five-state sweep through the "Acela Primary" (aka, the "I-95 primary)" so called because the primaries were in the states along the route of both the highway and Amtrak's signature fast train. The Donald's declaration might not reflect mathematical accuracy, and his nomination might not yet be inevitable, but it was the right campaign politics.

Voter ID upholds exiting laws

While elated to see the federal court uphold voter ID for my North Carolina neighbors ("Federal ruling on N. Carolina voting laws bolsters voter ID," Web, April 26), I am deeply saddened that a measure to prevent fraud and corruption of the American political process by the political left had to find sanctuary in legal corridors.