Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the stagnation of the Democrat party by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The late, great Democratic Party

This week the Democrats officially coronate the battered Hillary Clinton as the torch bearer for the party. She has slouched to the finish line. She is tired and the country is tired of her. Sorry, Democrats, no do-overs. You’re stuck with her.

EPA Smog Test on Humans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The EPA’s secret whitewash

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is trying to use the prestigious National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to cover-up the agency’s illegal science experiments on humans.

No Troops to Poland Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama must not send troops to Poland

This month, the Obama administration announced it would send 1,000 troops to Poland on a regular rotation as part of ongoing efforts to shore up the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO’s) Eastern flank. These American troops, said President Obama, will “serve shoulder to shoulder with Polish soldiers” to help out one of our country’s “most committed and important allies.”

Sheldon Adelson. (Associated Press)

Now it’s time to pay for the fun

- The Washington Times

Money is not the mother’s milk of politics, as the bundler’s cliche goes, but homemade vanilla ice cream, rich and creamy. Donald Trump hasn’t been getting any. Not much and not lately, anyway.

Saudi Handgun Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of Saudi support for terrorism

Last Friday, the infamous “28 pages” from the 2002 Congressional Joint Inquiry into the 9/11 attacks were declassified. For years, this final section of the report was kept from the public, which led some to believe that it contained evidence that the Saudi Arabian government was behind the attacks, either indirectly by financing al Qaeda or directly by providing support to the actual terrorists on the planes.

Illustration of Ted Cruz as Brutus by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz writes a political suicide note

- The Washington Times

Cleveland — As Charles Krauthammer put it, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wrote “the longest suicide note in U.S. History,” and it was a disjointed, contradictory one that revealed a deeply conflicted and narcissistic man. A principled stand for the party and country? Hardly.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a press conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the Foreign Office in London, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

The nightmarish results of Muslim outreach

When President Obama entered office, he dreamed that his hope-and-change messaging and his references to his familial Islamic roots would win over the Muslim world. The soon-to-be Nobel Peace Prize laureate would make the United States liked in the Middle East. Then terrorism would decrease.

Iran Missile Factory Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Iran delusions

July 14 was the first anniversary of President Obama’s nuclear agreement with Iran. Because the agreement renders our intelligence community deaf and blind to Iran’s nuclear weapons program, the new report from a German intelligence agency that Iran is violating the deal comes as no surprise.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton addresses the The National Education Association (NEA) Representative Assembly in Washington, Tuesday, July 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Apple polishing on the stump

Hillary Clinton took pandering to a new level when she addressed delegates to the National Education Association’s (NEA) convention on July 5.

Illustration on the loss of fighting spirit in the U.S. armed forces by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Don’t give up the ship’

The recent release of the investigative report on the “surrender” of two U.S. Navy heavily armed, 48-foot Riverine Coastal Patrol Boats in the North Arabian Sea on Jan. 12 to slightly smaller, armed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy center-console fishing-type boats was more than an embarrassment for the Navy.

Illustration on Trump's acceptance speech by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The speech Donald Trump should give tonight to win it all

- The Washington Times

Tonight in Cleveland, Donald Trump will accept the Republican nomination for president of the United States. His ascent is the most astonishing political story of our lifetimes, and he achieved it with breathtaking fearlessness, cleverness, wit and smarts. Most importantly, he had from the start an extraordinary sixth sense of the anger, betrayal and anxiety roiling voters and driving their desire to smash the existing order.

Erdogan and the Brotherhood Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The jihadis in France, the Islamists in Turkey

Streets ran red with blood in both France and Turkey last week. A terrorist atrocity and an attempted coup are quite different events. But underlying both is this question: How are the most dynamic forces within the Islamic world shaping the 21st century?

Anti-EU Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s challenge after Brexit

New surveys released this week by Britain’s EEF manufacturers’ organization and by PricewaterhouseCoopers predict that the United Kingdom’s June 23 vote to leave the European Union will result in economic slowdown. That may or may not prove true.

Related Articles

Judge, attorney corruption egregious

Cal Thomas' op-ed is spot-on about the way in which the corruption, disorder and division in our society is a reflection of what's in the hearts of each of us ("Cause and effect," Web, July 20). I don't believe the loss of Christianity is to blame because throughout history wickedness has been carried out by those who describe themselves as Christians. It is undeniable that we have lost the values, the "moral gravity that once kept us grounded, and the boundaries that kept us safe."

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Bridge Ladies: A Memoir'

Appealing is the word that kept recurring in my mind as I read literary agent and author Betsy Lerner's memoir of getting to know her mother's circle of contemporaries who have gathered each Monday yea these many long decades for lunch, bridge and much, much more.

Recent but undated handout photo issued on Friday July 22, 2016 by William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, of Britain's Prince George with the family dog Lupo, at Sandringham in Norfolk, England. Prince George celebrates his third birthday on July 22, 2016. (Matt Porteous/Handout via AP)

An awful crime in Blighty

There's a new crisis in Old Blighty. Prince George, son of the duke and duchess of Cambridge and grandson of Queen Elizabeth II, could soon be a common felon, and he's not quite 3 years old. It's not likely, but you never know. There's photographic proof that he committed a dastardly deed.

Illegals erode more than borders

The title of Donald Lambro's recent op-ed "This bizarre election year" (Web, July 14) teased the reader into thinking the piece was a fair and balanced review of the two 2016 presidential candidates. Instead it was a one-sided attack on the basic tenets of Donald Trump's plan to control our southern border, end sanctuary havens for illegal immigrants and enforce laws to preserve employment opportunities for law-abiding citizens.

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking to members of the media in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2016, after getting briefed on the investigation of a shooting at a nightclub in Orlando by FBI Director James Comey, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, and other officials.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Barack Obama, the condolence man

President Obama tries to project a sunny outlook on the world, mostly by denying that anything bad is happening anywhere. But he's having a hard time of it staying ahead of the radical Islamic terrorists who, he says, don't really exist.

Police under Pressure from Radical Groups Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Don't defend yourselves'

As officers' families mourn the deaths of ambushed police officers in Dallas, Baton Rouge and elsewhere, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and some in the liberal media are doing their best to stir up yet more minority resentment against police.

Take HSBC to task

The opening-night theme of the Republican National Convention this year was "Make America Safe Again." Perhaps the best way to help achieve this objective would be to root out all the banks that launder money to drug-trafficking cartels and terrorist organizations.

Inured to ISIS?

No one wants to see what is going on in Islamic-State-controlled Aleppo and Raqqa, Syria, but recent reports from CNN show the truth about what is happening in that war-torn part of the world. It is absolutely horrific, but I'm hesitant to share it with any of my friends because people just don't want to hear about it.

Within hours of his speech, Sen. Ted Cruz was fundraising off it, vowing that his own political movement will continue. He still has two years left before he needs to seek re-election to the Senate. (Associated Press)

Ted Cruz and an act of betrayal

Ted Cruz might have thought he was opening his 2020 campaign for president with his remarkable snub of the party and its nominee for president, but he was more likely making a deal with the undertaker.

Illustration on Ted Cruz' ploy to be "Reaganesque" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz's risky strategy

- The Washington Times

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz went "all in" Wednesday as he addressed the Republican Convention delegates in Cleveland, laid out his vision and pointedly ignored the opportunity to endorse the candidacy of Donald Trump. It was a risky move and may not work out as well for the ambitious Texan as he hopes.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Outfoxed: An Andy Carpenter Mystery'

"Your dog helped him escape" is a tempting kickoff for a thriller, especially when a fox terrier called Boomer is then accused of involvement in seven stabbings. It is less credible when Boomer turns out to be one of the animals under the protection of a lawyer called Andy Carpenter who cares more about canines than people.