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Illustration on Memorial Day by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Showing America’s gratitude

Orderly rows of white headstones line national cemeteries throughout our country. Each bears a name and behind that is a story of sacrifice. Today, a grateful nation remembers, but there is more we can do.

Illustration on remembering the sacrifices of U.S. Special Operators by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why special operators’ families must be remembered

Memorial Day is set aside for us to remember those who have fallen in defense of our country. This year’s observance should remind us that too many of us pay too little attention to the war that erupted on 9/11 in which Americans are still fighting, and sometimes dying, in many places around the world.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk from Marine One across the South Lawn to the White House in Washington, Saturday, May 27, 2017, as they return from Sigonella, Italy. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

No, Trump didn’t cause Obamacare to fail

It’s finally official. Obamacare is a public policy flop of epic proportions. That’s the only possible conclusion from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City announcement last week that it will drop out of many markets in Kansas and Missouri.

Karen Clarkson, of Fairbanks, Alaska, kneels and cries at the grave of her son U.S. Army Sergeant Joel Clarkson on Memorial Day at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Monday, May 28, 2012. (Rod Lamkey Jr/The Washington Times)

The bitter history of Memorial Day

It used to be called Decoration Day and was observed on May 30. Today it’s commonly known as Memorial Day and is celebrated on the last Monday in May, mostly to give Americans a long weekend. But it used to be a solemn remembrance of the nation’s war dead — by decorating graves with spring flowers.

Former US President Barack Obama is awarded the German Media Prize 2016 in Baden-Baden, Germany, Thursday, May 25, 2017.(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

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Ancient GOP Coin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How a free people gives up self-government

In 509 B.C. Romans drove out their king and instituted the world's first republic. And if you had asked a typical Roman citizen thereafter about the fate of that republic, he would have expressed the widely held sentiment that it would last forever. Romans, he would have argued, are passionately attached to our free institutions.

'Churchill and Orwell showed us the way'

What could still be left unsaid about Winston Churchill and George Orwell, two of the 20th century's most ferociously original thinkers? They regularly outraged their contemporaries while defining Britain's historical struggles against fascism, communism and imperialism. One measure of their legacy: We still we praise our best leaders as "Churchillian," our most provocative writers as "Orwellian."

Trump budget commendable

In most parts of the country, there aren't loud, violent protests against President Trump and his policies. Rather, most Americans are rooting for Mr. Trump's success and hope he will continue to find the resolve to stand up to the "resistance." Most of all, there is great hope and optimism that the president will live up to his promises.

Inclusion makes military stronger

I am disappointed by your decision to publish an opinion piece that blatantly disrespects brave Americans who proudly serve our nation in uniform. In a very specific attack on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service members, Rebecca Hagelin, the author of "Peace through diversity?" (Web, May 21) ridiculously argues that embracing the diversity of our armed forces somehow harms military readiness. Such outrageous nonsense and disregard for the strength of our military and those who serve in it are beyond reprehensible.

FILE - In this March 15, 1973 file photo, President Nixon tells a White House news conference that he will not allow his legal counsel, John Dean to testify on Capitol Hill in the Watergate investigation and challenged the Senate to test him in the Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi, File)

'Peace is the right memorial'

Memorial Day in America has traditionally been a time when we pay our respects to those who gave their lives, over a century ago, in a tragic civil war. In a broader sense, it has come to stand not only for the sacrifice of those who served in the War Between the States, but for all of those who have given their lives in arms since the birth of our nation.

People react while visiting the flower tributes at St Ann's square in central Manchester, England Friday May 26 2017. More than 20 people were killed in an explosion following a Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena late Monday evening. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira)

The left's dangerous dance with terrorists

- The Washington Times

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly went on national television recently and made this somewhat chilling remark: "If [Americans] knew what I knew about terrorism, [they'd] never leave the house in the morning." It's just that kind of frightening head thump on reality that makes one wonder: So why are so many leftists in this nation heck-bent on keeping borders open?

FILE - This Tuesday Sept. 27, 2016 file photo shows Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, Chief Justice Roger Gregory during an interview in his office in Richmond, Va. Gregory will preside over the full 15-judge court will hear the a lawsuit challenging President Trump's travel ban. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

4th Circuit's Russian roulette roll of the border

- The Washington Times

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit shot down yet another attempt by President Donald Trump to control and limit travelers to this country from terror hot spots in the world. It's like the panel just can't get enough of Russian roulette -- the game that's basically being played with America's border security and the open door approach the left wants to keep intact, regardless of terror and security concerns.

Facebook CEO and Harvard dropout Mark Zuckerberg delivers the commencement address at Harvard University commencement exercises, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Cambridge, Mass., (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Mark Zuckerberg's brainless world tax to pay all for being born

- The Washington Times

Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder of Facebook, has made his money -- his billions of dollars in a short span of time -- and now? Now, he wants yours. How? He pitched a global tax idea to Harvard graduations, a way of giving every man, woman and child a set amount of money for the simple reason of being born.