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Illustration on the decline of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the FBI is hard to trust

- The Washington Times

Can anyone with a modicum of common sense trust the Federal Bureau of investigation? The answer to that question is a resounding “no.” The claim that the FBI strives to be above politics is today and has always been absurd.

ACLU Legal and Policy director Rebecca Robertson talks during a news conference held by opponents of a "bathroom bill" at the Texas State Capitol, Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Austin, Texas. The Texas House is considering a bill that's different than one that sparked outcry when it cleared the state Senate last month. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

The ACLU goes hunting in Montana

In a 1981 speech before the California Peace Officers Assn., former Attorney General Ed Meese referred to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) as a “criminals’ lobby.”

Illustration on the need to deplot THAAD by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The folly of putting protection on ice

North Korea rarely misses an opportunity to threaten or provoke us. It does so most often with the launching of one or more ballistic missiles accompanied by a harangue that the missiles would soon be launched at us armed with nuclear weapons.

Illustration on the real situation of Cuba by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the new Cuba policy misses the mark

President Donald Trump announced his Cuba policy in Miami last week. I commend him for many of his efforts. He unveiled a replacement policy for the disastrous Cuba policy President Obama put into place. The highlight of Mr. Obama’s policy was lifting an economic embargo that was placed after the Communist revolution of Fidel Castro brought the world to the brink of nuclear war with the Missile Crisis in 1962.

The Illinois Shop of Horrors Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Banana Republic of Illinois

The media has hyper-obsessed over the Kansas tax hike this year and has sold this as a repudiation of “supply side economics.” But the real story in the states has been the catastrophic effects of “tax and spend” fiscal policy in Illinois.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The party’s over and no place to call home

- The Washington Times

That’s the dilemma of the Democrats, forlorn, despondent and walking in circles like the goose hit on the head with a long-handled wooden spoon. They’re asking questions for which there are no happy answers in the wake of their fourth straight loss in a round of special elections.

Illustration of Anne Morgan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Anne Morgan, an American Hero

The United States was finally in “the war to end all wars.” France had been ravaged since the summer of 1914. Villages and towns were obliterated. Women and children went hungry and homeless as the armies wrestled in futile combat in mud, blood and indescribable filth and disease. The British lost 20,000 dead in a single day at the Battle of the Somme.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn’t your insurance talking. It’s doctoring. It’s nursing. It’s medical technology. It’s your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can’t prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn’t do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.

Illustration on the devaluation of U.S. bonds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uncle Sam’s F-rated bonds

Were the United States any other country, its bonds would have long ago been downgraded to junk.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times

The thing people like about House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is that he is a serious guy who is capable of thinking big and has an ambitious agenda to salvage our ungovernable federal bureaucracy.

Photojournalist Shay Horse said he was pepper-sprayed while covering protests at the Jan. 21 presidential inauguration, even though his camera identified him as a journalist. (Sarah Nelson / The Washington Times)

Is ACLU lawsuit against D.C. cops a red herring?

- The Washington Times

“An officer told us to drop our pants,” Shay Horse said. “An officer went down the row telling each of us not to flinch as he grabbed our balls and yanked on them, and then stuck his finger up each of our anuses and wiggled it around. I felt like they were using molestation and rape as punishment.”

Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

Related Articles

A guidebook for Christians experiencing cultural vertigo

Those who recently attended an Easter Vigil service no doubt got a taste of what it's like to be a Christian in a post-Christian America. Perhaps a car or two idled by the throngs gathered around the paschal flame, or maybe a few people gaped and whispered, some pulling out a smartphone to record the mysterious ritual.

Another day, another investigation

Gone are the days when the losers went home after an election, to nurse their wounds, catalog their mistakes, and get ready for another round. Now an election is never over, and special prosecutors and their regiments of lawyers, egged on by the media, continue the campaign by "other means."

German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Friday, June 23, 2017. European Union leaders met in Brussels on the final day of their two-day summit to focus on ways to stop migrants crossing the Mediterranean and how to uphold free trade while preventing dumping on Europe's markets. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys)

Angela Merkel's welcome mat

Only the hard-hearted would slam the door against a refugee. Their stories are heart-breaking and their courage in seeking a better life in a new home is remarkable. Nevertheless, refugees in uncontrolled number are a headache for everyone. Germany, held up as a nation with a big heart, is learning the cost of Angela Merkel's big heart. More than a million refugees have arrived since 2015.

Saudi Arabia moving in right direction

Saudi Arabia's King Salman recently issued a royal decree, changing the name of the Saudi Bureau of Investigation and Public Prosecution to the more concise Public Prosecution. He also relieved Prince Mohammed bin Nayef of his role as minister of the interior and overseer of criminal investigations. Public prosecution now reports directly to King Salman, which will have a huge impact on Saudi Arabia's legal system.

Why no one trusts mainstream news

Last Wednesday I heard multiple radio commercials from the AARP hysterically attacking the Senate's health-care bill and urging West Virginia voters to call Sen. Shelley Moore Capito and pressure her to oppose the bill. This morning, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was still on the floor of the Senate making his very first public statements about the bill, many mainstream-media outlets were publicizing a poll in which large numbers of Americans oppose the bill.

Rep. Adam Schiff, right, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speak during the Los Angeles LGBTQ #ResistMarch, Sunday, June 11, 2017, in West Hollywood, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Dems gnash teeth, weep, wail -- but won't change

- The Washington Times

Democrats may be floundering to understand their recent election losses. But the reasons aren't hidden. Note to Dems: Your resistance messages aren't resonating, your left-of-left viciousness is off-putting and truly, you refuse to change.

In this photo taken Sunday, June 4, 2017, a woman church leader reads from a bible in her native Bari language, at the United Church which is held in a school classroom tent, in Bidi Bidi refugee settlement in northern Uganda. The South Sudanese refugees meet in open-air churches rigged from timber with seats made only from planks of wood or logs drilled into the ground, yet these churches for the born-again Christians are oases of joy among the daily humiliations that come with rebuilding their lives. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Christians battle GuideStar on 'hate group' tag

- The Washington Times

Conservative and Christian organizations dinged by GuideStar as "hate groups" have risen up and launched a counter-attack, asking the supposed nonpartisan watchdog of the nonprofit world to reverse course and remove the labels. And well GuideStar should.

President Donald Trump speaks during the Congressional Picnic on the South Lawn of the White House, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Hallelujah -- North Korea thinks Trump's nuts

- The Washington Times

North Korea, via its state-run Communist Party newspaper, put out the message that President Donald Trump's a "psychopath" who needs to be curbed and controlled. Hallelujah. North Korea thinks Trump's a nutcase. It's just such messaging that's great for America -- that's great for America's national security.

A man passes by a TV news program showing a photo published in North Korea's Rodong Sinmun newspaper of North Korea's new type of cruise missile launch, at Seoul Railway station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, June 9, 2017. North Korea said Friday it has tested a new type of cruise missile that could strike U.S. and South Korean warships "at will" if it is attacked, in an apparent reference to the projectiles detected by Seoul when they were launched a day earlier. The signs read "Can hit on the ground." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) ** FILE **

North Korea tests rocket engine for ICBM

If there was ever a deadly challenge designed for newly elected President Donald Trump, North Korea is it. The hermit regime, which is hell-bent on threatening the United States and its allies in the Pacific with destruction, has just tested a large rocket engine that analysts believe is designed to power an intercontinental ballistic missile, you know, the kind that can destroy a U.S. city in 20 minutes.

Actor Johnny Depp introduces a film at the Glastonbury music festival at Worthy Farm, in Somerset, England, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo by Grant Pollard/Invision/AP)

Johnny Depp skates on kill Trump joke -- unlike Obama clown

- The Washington Times

Johnny Depp, Hollywood movie star, made a tasteless joke about President Donald Trump's assassination, and the media yawned. But if this had been about Barack Obama, the mainstream media would be alive with rage, and the jokester would be out of work. Remember the Missouri rodeo clown?

Now they want to read

I find it laughable that the Democratic congressional members are claiming no one has had time to read or study the 1,000-page, Republican-sponsored Obamacare modification. Yet I seem to remember that in 2010, then House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged Congress to pass President Obama's 2,000-page health-care act so that Congress and all of America could "find out what's in it "