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The Hillary Effect on Women Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s problem with women

Two weeks before the election, Hillary Clinton appears on track to win the presidency and become the first female commander in chief. She can credit her surge in the polls this last month to women — primarily her opponent’s offensive comments unearthed from a decade ago and the various accusations that have suddenly surfaced and have dominated the media.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets supporters following a "Get out the vote," rally at Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016 in downtown Tampa, Fla. (Loren Elliot/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Hillary’s anti-transparency bargain

President Obama recently condemned the Republican Party, claiming that its “central principle” is to suppress voting. But, while his administration piously pledges to protect voting rights, it has almost guaranteed that Americans will be blindfolded on Election Day. While the Justice Department will deploy election monitors at polls in 25 states, no one watched Uncle Sam.

Illustration on NATO fiscal responsibility by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A threadbare alliance

Historians and political scientists commonly describe the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the most effective military alliance in contemporary history. It was the bond between the United States and Western Europe that helped contribute to the decline and eventual collapse of the Soviet Union.

Illustration on the 2016 campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Donald Trump is still the safer choice

America is a two-party system and after party conventions select the nominees, we have two choices and only two choices. Both nominees have demonstrated serious character flaws. The current spotlight is on lewd, vulgar comments from Donald Trump that cannot be defended. Nevertheless, his words could never be used to justify a vote for Hillary Clinton and her leftist agenda.

Donald Trump arrives at a Trump rally at Sanford Orlando International Airport in Sanford, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. Trump is pledging to bolster the government's investment in the space program, a boon to the Space Coast of Florida. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

The staying power of populism

Despite evidence from the 2016 presidential campaign, doubts dominate about populism’s ability to win America’s ultimate prize. “It can’t happen here” is as wrong as the political establishment’s misreading of the populist movement itself. Populism’s history here and abroad argues a populist triumph could eventually occur — if not this November, then soon.

Missile Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran’s proxy missile attacks

The recent missile attacks attributed to Yemeni Houthi rebels, with assistance from the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and Hezbollah, demonstrate Iran’s classic use of proxies to promote its political agenda. The Houthi rebels denied any involvement in the missile attacks.

Illustration on non-voters by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of the nonvoter

Between now and Nov. 8, Americans will be inundated with good-intentioned public service announcements urging them to take the time to vote. And to buttress that argument, statistics about the usual low turnout rate — about 60 percent or so — will suggest that this American trend is somehow illustrative of a major defect in the body politic.

John Podsesta (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The coming media settlement with Hillary

- The Washington Times

There’s no one more repentant and eager to promise reform than the town drunk coming off a week at the bottom of a bottle. Some of “the top political reporters in the country,” as they think of themselves, will be soon looking for similar redemption.

The Tail Wagging the Middle East Dog Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mistaking the cause of Middle East turmoil

President Obama might sandbag Israel in pursuit of something Palestinian leadership rejects — peace with the Jewish state. The blow reportedly may fall in the interregnum between the Nov. 8 election and the Jan. 20 inauguration of the next president.

Illustration on human trafficking and open borders by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The other open-borders commodity

Some proponents of the current open borders policy also claim to be defenders of women’s rights. It is, therefore, supremely ironic that one unintended consequence of open borders is a substantial spike in sex trafficking of young girls. That’s the major takeaway of a trip to South Texas earlier this month.

Illustration on Hillary's support of partial birth abortion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reconsider ‘Never Trump’

While Democrats perpetually circle the wagons, Republicans engage a perpetual circular firing squad. The same holds true for many evangelicals. Democrats and secularists count on it.

Britney Corbett oversees a ninth-grade math at Washington Leadership Academy in Northeast D.C. The technology-focused high school charter, which opened its doors in August, teaches students the basics and how to write computer code and use drones. (Julia Porterfield/The Washington Times)

Black students matter

Money talks and the NAACP walks away from its mission to ensure educational equality for black kids.

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Gene Riley, of Brattleboro, Vt., fills out his ballot at the town clerk office in the municipal building during early voting on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, in Brattleboro, Vt. (Kristopher Radder /The Brattleboro Reformer via AP)

Choosing the president

There's nothing new under the sun, as Ecclesiastes reminds us, but this presidential election campaign comes close. Rarely if ever have both parties nominated candidates who invite so much anger, frustration, indifference and even contempt.

Fourth estate dropped ball on election

There was a time when the fourth estate (i.e., the press or news media) was respected as an institution that represented and protected the public interests. Now it seems the focus of the media is on pandering to the public's worst instincts in order to attract a large audience and thus increase profits.

Fund TB eradication

What many think of as a disease from the days of "La Bohme" — tuberculosis — is today the world's leading infectious killer. According to new data from the World Health Organization, the age-old scourge is even worse than we knew — with more people falling sick, more people dying and more cases of dangerous, drug-resistant strains than we previously thought. How is this possible when TB is both preventable and curable?

Donald Trump speaking at Gettysburg, PA      Associated Press photo

Trump's 'contract'

Last Saturday, Donald Trump delivered a speech in Gettysburg, Pa., that he should have given much earlier in the campaign, minus the usual threats against women who have accused him of sexual assault.

FILE - In this June 17, 2014, file photo, FBI Director James Comey addresses a news conference at the FBI Minneapolis field office in Brooklyn Center, Minn. Dramatic videos of deadly law enforcement encounters and the absence of reliable data about how often police use force contribute to a regrettable narrative that "biased police are killing black men at epidemic rates," Comey said Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

The FBI's sideways handling of Hillary

When FBI Director James Comey announced on July 5 that the Department of Justice (DOJ) would not seek the indictment of Hillary Clinton for failure to safeguard state secrets related to her email use while she was secretary of state, he both jumped the gun and set in motion a series of events that surely he did not intend.

Illustration on the decline of reading among boys by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Readin' and writin,' but not for boys

Reading is not for sissies, as the front page of the newspaper demonstrates every morning in the homestretch of a raucous presidential campaign. But there's a deeper problem that civility and good manners won't cure.

Not tonight, I Have a Headache Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trading amour for anger

As I have been saying, the sexual revolution of the 1960s is now over. We can thank Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton's gang of angry women (whom Donald either knew or did not know years ago) for that. I think it is a contribution to the moral life of the republic, but I might be wrong.