Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content


Featured Articles

The United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization logo is pictured on the entrance at UNESCO's headquarters in Paris, Monday Oct. 17, 2016. UNESCO's executive board has approved on Tuesday a resolution that Israel says denies the deep historic Jewish connection to holy sites in Jerusalem _ and that has angered Israel's government and many Jews around the world. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

America’s missed UNESCO opportunity

If President Obama continues to prioritize his political legacy over the national security interests of the United States—which would be a secure and sovereign Israel—Congress at least should have the courage to lead this charge.

Illustration on the international dangers of a Clinton presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary, the violent humanitarian

After yet another meeting of diplomats failed to resolve the war in Syria, our ever-clueless secretary of state, John Kerry, said on October 15 that diplomacy would continue because of “the urgency of trying to find something that works other than military action.”

Justifying Ones Views on Abortion Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary’s faith

“Secretary Clinton, I want to explore how far you believe the right to abortion goes,” asked Fox News Channel’s Chris Wallace, moderator for the third and final presidential debate. “You have been quoted as saying that the fetus has no constitutional rights. You also voted against a ban on late-term, partial-birth abortions. Why?”

Illustration on Hillary's contradictory positions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary, the hypocrite

In the modern history of American politics has there ever been a bigger hypocrite than Hillary Clinton? Her 30 years in politics has taught us clearly that Hillary lives by one set of rules and wants to impose different rules for everyone else.

Unequal Access for Land Owners Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No equal justice for landowners

Lawyers are expensive, especially when citizens fight the federal government. That is why, in 1980, Congress passed the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA), which authorizes those who prevail in litigation against the federal government to collect attorney’s fees and expenses, that is, unless federal lawyers were “substantially justified,” in bringing and litigating the case. Sadly, a Wyoming federal district court recently turned the EAJA on its head.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes the stage for the third presidential debate at University of Nevada in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary as ladies’ fashion leader. Who knew?

- The Washington Times

Nobody has accused Hillary Clinton of setting an example of how to dress for success, and certainly not for fun. She’s clearly no Melania Trump. But she may be assisting the Chinese in bringing back “the Mao suit.” She probably shouldn’t expect a standing ovation from men.

Illustration on Special Ops forces by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Where warrior-spies fight in the shadows

As the Obama administration has retreated, or openly flirted with retrenchment, from Middle Eastern wars during its tenure, America has been spared the full onslaught of jihadi terrorism because of the exertions of nation’s special military forces and the intelligence communities working in concert.

Illustration on the Banana Republic level of Obama/Clinton politics by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Obama-Clinton banana republic

- The Washington Times

A fair, balanced, and independent Justice Department. Neutral diplomats, who serve the public over politics, at the State Department. An unbiased, honest, mainstream media.

Importance of the Black Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why blacks should abandon the Democratic Party

Unnoticed by the mainstream media, which prefers showier displays of political protest, there is a quiet revolution going on in the African-American community. Confronted by a problematic candidate and a platform that has abandoned them, more and more black voters are questioning whether they should support the Democratic Party.

Illustration on Trump's negative impact on the GOP by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

It didn’t have to be this way

The presidential debates are mercifully over in an election that may long be remembered as a lost opportunity for Republicans to take control of the nation’s government for the next four to eight years.

An unnamed, newborn eastern black rhino walks around with it's mother, Ayana, Monday Oct. 17, 2016, at the Blank Park Zoo in Des Moines, Iowa. The endangered eastern black rhino mother gave birth to the female, 80-pound calf on Oct. 11, and is likely the first endangered rhino born in the state of Iowa, according zoo officials. “This is an extremely significant event — not only in Blank Park Zoo’s 50 year history, but also for this critically endangered animal species,” zoo CEO Mark Vukovich said. (Rodney White/The Des Moines Register via AP)

Recovering the Endangered Species Act

The late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia once described the Endangered Species Act as imposing “unfairness to the point of financial ruin — not just upon the rich, but upon the simplest farmer who finds his land conscripted to national zoological use.” His comment resonates with far too many landowners across the country.

Dehumanizing Assisted Suicide Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hurting the seriously ill rather than helping

The D.C. Council voted this week to add a physician-assisted suicide bill to their legislative agenda. Proponents insist that such suicides be viewed as a purely private matter between an autonomous adult who desires to die and another autonomous adult who can provide medical assistance in death.

A worker steps through the maze of hoses being used at a remote fracking site in Rulison, Colorado. (Associated Press/File)

The geopolitics of fracking

Events in the United States occurring during the past two weeks promise to shake up global energy markets and undermine Russian power, unless President Obama or Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton further attempt to prop up Russian President Vladimir Putin’s energy cabal.

Illustration on the IRS under Hillary Clinton's presidency by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s IRS — a sneak preview

Imagine: What if the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) singled out hundreds of grassroots citizens groups across the nation and subjected them to ill treatment because of their political beliefs and values, mainly in opposition to the president of the United States?

Related Articles

Former President Bill Clinton, left, accompanied by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at debate watch party at the Craig Ranch Regional Amphitheater in North Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, following the third presidential debate. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Clintons' top 10 pay-to-play scandals

- The Washington Times

The Clintons' have been involved in an elaborate pay-to-play scheme, auctioning off their personal time and government access, to the highest bidder. The Clinton Foundation was the vehicle used by foreign governments and dignitaries, in which they would donate money to in exchange for time with the potential next president, the former president, or beneficial treatment from the U.S. government while Hillary Clinton was serving as Secretary of State.

Bill Clinton the real danger to women

The recent disclosure of Donald Trump's past 'locker-room' blather remains disheartening. But what are more than taxing to digest and countenance are the self-righteous pontifications from the likes of assorted major media columnists and other hypocritical miscreants of the far left regarding this regrettable Trump behavior.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump arrives to speak at a campaign rally at Regent University, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2016, in Virginia Beach, Va. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

A little tease by the Donald

Donald Trump may be having a little fun, even if his friends and foes, who are worrying about what happens on Nov. 8, are not. They're not sure why he said he wouldn't accept defeat, nor what, exactly, he meant. He hardly clarified his meaning to them the next day when he said he would accept the voters' verdict "if I win."

Hillary unsafe at any 'speed'

While all of Queen Clinton's media and all of the establishment cockroaches are scurrying out from under their rocks and clamoring for Donald Trump to withdraw from the race, it is perhaps worthwhile to recall Hillary Clinton's own hypocritical track record on issues of character ("When character is in season," Web, Oct. 19).

Obama-sanctioned misogyny OK

President and Mrs. Obama have invited numerous rappers to the White House over their years in residence, rappers whose lyrics are not only as misogynistic as the Donald's spoken words back in 2005, but much more violent ("And they call it puppy love," Web, Oct. 18).

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton greets supporters during a campaign event at University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Sunday, Oct. 23, 2016, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The peril in the polls

Public-opinion polls can be infuriating. They're often read as if they're telling us how to vote, rather than a speculation on how what we'll do. Indeed, some voters who want to be part of a fashionable majority will take them that way, and hitch a ride on a bandwagon.

In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2016 file photo, Hillary Clinton's campaign manager John Podesta speaks to members of the media outside Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's home in Washington. Hacked emails reveal internal disagreement among top Clinton aides about her determination to hold a Clinton Foundation summit in Morocco that later drew attention over its reliance on large donations from foreign governments.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

When major media looked the other way

Two Democratic Party campaign operatives lost their jobs last Tuesday after being caught red-handed on video describing how to incite violence at Donald Trump rallies and how to commit massive voter fraud.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Fates and Traitors: A Novel of John Wilkes Booth'

"Fates and Traitors," Jennifer Chiaverini's new historical novel, starts on a high note: "A sound in the darkness outside the barn -- a furtive whisper, the careless snap of a dry twig underfoot -- woke him from a fitful doze ... There ... quick footfalls, and, more distantly, the jingle of spurs."

Integrity, honesty absent at FBI

The FBI and Department of Justice are prosecuting retired four-star Gen. James Cartwright for mishandling classified information, in the apparent belief that this shows the American public the FBI is willing to prosecute even big-shots.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump smiles during a campaign rally at the Delaware County Fair, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, in Delaware, Ohio. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

The debt to Donald Trump

Donald Trump and his regiments marched out of Las Vegas Thursday morning in high spirits. Maybe they were just whistling past that famous graveyard where hopes go to die. Or maybe not. Some post-debate polls show the race still tied, and if that's true the debate changed very little. There's still the election, to settle the dispute once and for all, or at least until 2020. (That campaign begins Nov. 9.)

Remove corruption to fix U.S.

In 1974, we removed a president for lying to the American people and covering up a political burglary. We correctly deemed this necessary to confirm the 'rule of law' and strengthen our republic. In those days no one man or woman was above the law. The 'cancer' on the presidency and government was duly removed.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, accompanied by Campaign Manager Robby Mook, left, and traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, right, smiles as she speaks with members of the media aboard her campaign plane at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, following the third presidential debate. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary and the buck

With so many campaign reporters in the tank with her, eager for a little warm and cuddly, Hillary Clinton's fear of talking to them is a puzzle. She can be sure of not getting very many tough questions, and her answers will be carefully presented to an unsuspecting reader/viewership. They all share the same assignment, to destroy the Donald.