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Illustration on Iran's empty condemnation of terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Iran’s empty condemnation of terrorism

About two days after an Orlando gunman carried out the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the Iranian foreign ministry issued a statement purporting to decry the incident. Speaking via the state-run IRNA, a spokesperson said the Iranian regime “condemns” the attack “based on its principled policy of condemning terrorism and its strong will to seriously confront this evil phenomenon.”

Illustration on prospects for the post-EU British economy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Britain’s economy, post-Brexit

This is no time to sell the United Kingdom short. Its economic and political institutions remain among the strongest in the world and should afford it considerable opportunity to negotiate new arrangements with the European Union.

Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama, left, welcomes the Albanian national soccer squad arriving in Tirana after failing to qualify to the next round at the EURO 2016 European Championship, Thursday, June 23, 2016.(AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)

An albatross in Albania?

In what is increasingly reminiscent of a John Le Carre novel, it seems that with each passing month there is a new chapter in a seemingly unending series of revelations of political intrigue and drama that are overwhelming the Republic of Albania.

Illustration on the Brexit outcome's effects on uncontrolled migration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rule Britannia

Whether you think the United Kingdom exiting the European Union is cause for alarm or celebration, you have to concede this: Britons engaged in an open, lively and mostly peaceful debate, they turned out in droves, they cast their votes freely and fairly and, by so doing, expressed their will and determined their future. That’s called democracy. Is there a preferable alternative?

Term Limits for Congress Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The common sense of term limits

As our first president, George Washington knew that everything he did set a pattern for those who would follow. He served two terms in office, then stepped down. He declined all efforts to get him to stay.

Illustration on a proposal to create boards of directors to oversee Executive branch departments by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A remedy for overregulation

If the 2016 presidential election has proved anything so far, it’s that millions of Americans know something is seriously wrong in Washington and they want it fixed. They’re right.

Jihad Magazines Collage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The original jihadists

They wave a menacing black banner, behead American hostages in slickly produced videos, entice hardened jihadis and thrill-seeking wannabes alike to their ranks, bust a border to establish a state and claim provinces from West Africa to Southeast Asia.

Illustration on Joyful Noise's fundraising for the Sanders campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Joyful Noise unites ‘citizens for Sanders’

Throughout this year’s presidential primary, Sen. Bernie Sanders made support for tougher campaign finance laws a cornerstone of his (now presumably concluding) campaign. His website railed against the “political campaign finance system” as “corrupt,” and “the disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision” as “hing[ing] on the absurd notion that money is speech, [and] corporations are people.”

Illustration on the need to identify radical Islamic's impact on homosexuality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s duty after Orlando

Americans witnessed evil once again as a radical Islamic gunman — who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State’s caliph — recently killed or wounded 102 people while they were enjoying “Latin Night” in a popular gay night club in Orlando. It was the deadliest attack on the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender (LBGT) community in American history.

Brexit Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Brexit’s unsettling aftermath

The British independence referendum vote on June 23 was close and, surely we all will respect the will of the British people. The British prime minister, doing the honorable thing, resigned. Yet many British people are deeply ashamed of the result, owing to the barely unspoken rationale behind many votes: immigration (very un-British), and the likely consequences.

Chicken Little

Nobody does hysteria like the media

- The Washington Times

Chicken Little will have company when the sky falls on the British isles and the world ends, which the European Union, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the BBC, CBS, NBC, ABC and Barack Obama can now say with confidence will be at 2:20 in the morning next Thursday (just in time for the late final editions).

Illustration on U.S. job opportunities and economic stagnation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Brexit’ strikes back at the elites

Last week, Britain voted to leave the European Union, freeing itself from international governance. Just as the United States would recoil at the thought of Canadians making laws that trump U.S. governance were that a provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Britain is evidently fed up with ceding its sovereignty to unelected bureaucrats in Brussels as part of its international agreements.

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Don't let Clinton get the phone

Many differences exist between conservative and liberal values and positions. Hillary Clinton declared that as president she would expand Obama's programs; Donald Trump stated he would make sure Obama's "unconstitutional actions" never returned. Clinton is pro-immigration-expansion while Trump believes we should slow or stop immigration until its policies are fixed.

British Prime Minister David Cameron walks to get in a car as he leaves 10 Downing Street in London, to attend Prime Minister's Questions at the Houses of Parliament, Wednesday, June 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

The price of a European pout

George Bernard Shaw observed that England and America are a common people separated by a common language, and nothing has happened since to change what has made that friendship unique among nations.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally, Wednesday, June 29, 2016, in Bangor, Maine.(AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Life imitates art

Like him or not, and a lot of folks say they don't like him, but Donald Trump gets everybody's attention. Hillary Clinton gets attention, too, teaming up briefly with Elizabeth Warren for "a girls' night out." But the Donald burns barns.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Foreign Agent'

Brad Thor always packs into his thrillers more fast-paced action and particularly clever twists and turns of riveting suspense than just about anyone else writing in this genre. He's remarkably adept at keeping the reader on edge, wondering what could possibly come next and where it's all going to lead. You can't seem to turn the pages fast enough as you anxiously anticipate what you might discover at the ending.

Illustration on Donald Trump's "Christian" faith by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Campaign conversion?

Following a meeting between a group of evangelical leaders and Donald Trump last week, James Dobson, founder of Focus on the Family, was interviewed by Pennsylvania pastor Michael Anthony. Mr. Dobson told Mr. Anthony that Mr. Trump had recently come "to accept a relationship with Christ" and is now a "baby Christian."

Illustration on the effects of Hillary Clinton's undeclared war on Libya by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Illegal war and disguised truth

The 800-plus-page report of the House Select Committee on Benghazi was released earlier this week. It slams former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for her willful indifference to her obligation to repel military-style attacks on American interests and personnel at the U.S. consulate and a nearby CIA annex in Benghazi.

Illustration on Trump's "National Populist" campaign theme by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's pudding with a theme

Everyone's looking for what Winston Churchill called a pudding with a theme. How did the likes of Donald Trump make it to the forefront of American politics? How did the British break their strong link with the Europeans just across the channel? The common denominator, so we're told, is "revolution, down with the elites, power to the people."

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell speaks outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, April 27, 2016, after the Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the corruption case against McDonnell. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A rebuke of runaway prosecutors

The decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to vacate the public-corruption conviction of Bob McDonnell, the former governor of Virginia, deserves the applause of everyone. Just as there is no Republican or Democratic way to put out a fire, there should be no Republican or Democratic way to protect the fundamental rights of everyone.