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Illustration on corrupt reprisals from the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Payback from the IRS

The Internal Revenue Service’s woes did not begin or end with Lois Lerner and the agency’s targeting of political opponents with punitive action. Earlier this month we became painfully aware (again) that political games and punishing the taxpayer appear to be the burgeoning raison d’etre of the tax-collecting agency.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

Related Articles

Gov. Terry McAuliffe, the new Democratic governor, no fan of the civility-in-government movement, calls Mr. Black's measure "counterproductive and mean-spirited" and had threatened to veto it if the legislation passed. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Breaking the law is no solution

No one would reward a shoplifter just because he manages to get out of the store with stolen merchandise, but every Democrat in the Virginia state Senate — and one Republican — voted last week to reward those who broke into the country illegally and get a valuable public benefit.

Two years after Obamacare opened for business, Mr. Obama's health care scheme isn't exactly solving the problem every American must deal with. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Doubling down on disaster

President Obama is for choice and competition in the health-insurance market, as befits a champion of the free market, except when he isn't. "My guiding principle is, and always has been," he said in 2009 when he was trying to sell Obamacare, "that consumers do better when there is choice and competition. That's how the market works. In Alabama, almost 90 percent of the market is controlled by just one company. And without competition, the price of insurance goes up and quality goes down."

Greek Cypriots should return to negotiations

Contrary to the Hellenic Institute's Nick Larigakis' latest round of histrionics ("Turkey's Cyprus incursion nothing new," Letters, Jan. 21), the appearance of a civilian seismic exploration vessel offshore is a modest assertion of the inherent rights of Turkish Cypriots and a peaceful response to the Greek Cypriot side's disruptive, unilateral actions.

Romney's return

This is to put in my two cents in support of Mitt Romney as the Republican candidate for president. It is an unfortunate truism in this day and age that a winning candidate must be tall and handsome with an attractive wife. Abe Lincoln would never make it now, nor would some of Mitt's potential rivals.

The lessons he learned in public service

Considering his life as a U.S. foreign service officer (FSO), Christopher Hill has few regrets. An FSO brat, his passion for diplomacy was fostered early. Referencing a formative experience in Cameroon, Mr. Hill explains, "I signed up for the Foreign Service exam ... and resolved to pass it, because I knew that was what I wanted to do with my life."

Image from the Public Religion Research Institute

53 percent of Americans say God rewards 'athletes of faith' with good health, success on the field

- The Washington Times

Sunday is often associated with both church and devoted football watching. Now there's an intersection of the two: 53 percent of Americans and 56 percent of sports fans say "that God rewards athletes who have faith with good health and success on the playing field." So says a new survey of public sentiment about sports and religion conducted by the nonpartisan Public Religion Research Institute and the Religion News Service.

"Intelligent' computer keyboard can identify users by the pattern of their key taps. (American Chemical Society)

True cybersecurity: 'Intelligent' computer keyboard identifies users by pattern of their key taps

- The Washington Times

Protective computer passwords have some competition. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a novel intelligent computer keyboard that not only cleans itself - but can identify users by the pattern and style of their fingertips and keystrokes. The "human-machine interfacing" device, reported in the American Chemical Society's academic journal "Nano," could provide a foolproof way to prevent unauthorized users from gaining direct access to computers.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie attends a gathering to announce that Seton Hall University and the parent company of Hackensack University Medical Center are planning to build a private medical school, Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, in Nutley, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Chris Christie on 'last-ditch effort' to regain his mystique, says New Jersey analyst

- The Washington Times

He was once intensely popular, and his signature style wooed the media and voters both in and out of his home state. Those who watch him closely think New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is about to lose his mojo. "It's been fascinating to see the Christie strategy unfold over the past two years. It's been a bit like watching a ping pong match," says one New Jersey pollster

President Obama gives his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Three cheers for gridlock

Gridlock became a dirty word in Washington after the Republicans regained the majority in the House of Representatives and stood in the path of the invader from Fantasy Island, shouting "Stop!" The president wanted a rubber stamp, and the Democrats agreed, demanding of the Republicans, "Why can't you be like us?"

Chloe Kim competes during the women's snowboarding superpipe final at the Dew Tour iON Mountain Championships in Breckenridge, Colo.  (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Snow jobs in the mountains

Once upon a time the inquisitive and the young, the reckless and the incurably naive wore their convictions on the rear bumpers of their Volkswagen Beetles: "Question authority." Time marches on. Now those purveyors of rebellion have become the authority, and they want no further questions. "Shut up," they advise.