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FILE - In this March 22, 2014, file photo, former President Bill Clinton, left, listens as former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a student conference for the Clinton Global Initiative University at Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz. Clinton had long ago moved on from her bruising defeat in her 2008 presidential run. Clinton questioned whether the country was willing to give her family the White House for the third time. A less talked about concern was health, both hers and her husbands. The former president had undergone quadruple bypass surgery and had to make drastic lifestyle changes. Hillary Clinton would be 69 years old on Election Day, tying Ronald Reagan as the oldest American to be elected president if she won. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

The Clinton money-market account

- The Washington Times

If we can believe Hillary Clinton (and there’s no reason why anyone should), she and Bubba have gone from “dead broke” when they left the White House to accumulating riches that beggar Croesus, the ancient king of Lydia, and Midas, who was rich even before he started selling mufflers for Pontiacs and Chevys. Nevertheless, Hillary and Bubba are lining up now for seconds.

This image released by Vani Hari shows the food blogger among boxes of cereal in Charlotte, N.C. The former management consultant turned healthy-living activist has a best-selling book and an army of supporters. She deploys them regularly to move giants in the food industry via online petitions that, among other things, helped get Kraft Foods to give up artificial dyes in its macaroni and cheese. (Courtesy Vani Hari via AP)

The crusade of food bimbos

This week, Kraft Foods announced that it was changing the formulation of its famous macaroni and cheese. The company will remove food coloring after being the latest target of an online peasants-with-pitchforks campaign run by a blogger calling herself “The Food Babe.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, and Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., right,  head into the Senate Chamber on Cap[itol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 23, 2015, for the confirmation vote on the nomination of Loretta Lynch for Attorney General. Lynch won confirmation to serve as attorney general Thursday from a Senate that forced her to wait more than five months for the title and remained divided to the end.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Getting back to business

Anyone looking for signs that Barack Obama’s presidency is running out of gas got a glimmer of hope this week from his daily schedule.

Illustration on Holder's contempt for justice while attorney general by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A calculated corruptor of justice

The first attorney general to be held in contempt of Congress has demonstrated shocking contempt for the law, and the ability to abuse and corrupt it for the political and social agenda of this president.

Eric Holder’s legacy

As Attorney General Eric Holder finally departs, he leaves behind a demoralized Justice Department that has been politicized to an unprecedented degree.

Illustration on Eric Holder's history of pardoning and releasing terrorists by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In agreement with America’s enemies

Only days before President Obama’s inauguration in Jan., 2009, I was invited to testify at Eric Holder’s confirmation hearing regarding his engineering, as deputy attorney general, the infamous 1999 Clinton clemency grants to 16 unrepentant members of the Puerto Rican terror group, Armed Forces of National Liberation (FALN).

Justice driven by race illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Eric Holder’s legacy

Alas, the Eric Holder era is over. But critics who think his departure means normalcy will return haven’t been paying attention. Mr. Holder was President Obama’s point man for fundamentally transforming the country, and he did his job well.

Illustration on the adverse impact of five years of Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shreds of doubt about Obamacare

Last week’s tax-filing deadline was a little bit more complicated than in the past, thanks to Obamacare.

Illustration on Hillary and money questions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary’s hurdles

Nearly four months into the two-year presidential election cycle, Hillary Clinton is running into deep trouble on several major political fronts.

Wind mills work atop the mesa near Sterling City, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Financing Climate Crisis, Inc.

The Obama administration is using climate change to “fundamentally transform” America. It plans to make the climate crisis industry so enormous that no one will be able to dismantle it, even as computer models and disaster claims totally lose credibility — and even if Republicans control Congress and the White House after 2016.

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Sen. Ted Cruz, Texas Republican, will be in Iowa talking over faith and freedom. (Associated Press)

GOP presidential hopefuls skip White House Correspondents Dinner, opt for faith in Iowa

- The Washington Times

Nine Republican presidential hopefuls will not be among the 3,000-ish guests at the annual White House Correspondents' Dinner in the nation's capital. They have a different calling on Saturday. Though politically attuned to every opportunity, this group will be in Waukee, Iowa, at the Point of Grace church — talking up the big topics at the 15th annual Iowa Faith & Freedom Coalition’s "kick-off" voter outreach.

In this Dec. 7, 2005 file photo, former South African President, Nelson Mandela, smiles at the Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg. The former political prisoner who became the country's first black president in 1994 died in December 2013 at the age of 95. Pan Macmillan said Tuesday, March 24, 2015, that it will publish the sequel to Mandela's best-selling autobiography "Long Walk to Freedom" in Britain, South Africa, India and Australasia in 2016. U.S. and Canadian rights have not yet been sold. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

Dreams of children of angry fathers

Most Americans can't quite understand how events of previous centuries still have the power to stir anger and resentments, and make an appreciation of their common interests difficult. Well, some Americans can recall a certain anger late on a summer night after a third or even fourth bourbon and branch water, but the feeling quickly goes away. Nations, after all, do not have permanent friends, in Lord Palmerston's famous explanation to Queen Victoria, but nations do have permanent interests and memories of a civil war no longer poisons those interests on these shores.

Sen. David Vitter, Louisiana Republican, says he'll try to force the Senate to vote on a bill halting the subsidy that lawmakers and their staffs get to pay for insurance on the Obamacare exchanges, saying that's a benefit no other American receives, so Congress shouldn't either. (Associated Press)

Treats from the congressional buffet

Successful congressional candidates of both parties often — perhaps usually — suffer amnesia when they get to Washington, and get a glance of the vast buffet of perks Congress votes for itself. They forget a lot of the promises they made during their successful campaigns for Congress. Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana, a Republican, has not forgotten. He's trying to find out who certified that Congress is a "small business" so its members and their highly paid staffs could be eligible for an Obamacare subsidy for employees of businesses with fewer than 50 employees.

Limit government, grow America

Preceded by government growth under Presidents Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson and Lyndon Johnson, as well as the Sixteenth Amendment, six years of an Obama administration has turned the federal expanse into a terminal case of social, political, economic and national-security disease.

Congress, media failing to do duty

In his recent op-ed,"To run toward the breach — or to run away" (Web, April 21), Clifford May notes that the critical issue in President Obama's Iran deal is whether Congress will allow it to compromise America's sovereignty. It is shocking that this should even be a matter of choice.

Fishing, hiking, sin and mystery

Lascivious old men of the world, unite. You have a new champion. Ever since becoming as well-known to AARP and Social Security as he is to his many readers, 77-year-old Jim Harrison, one of the finest American writers of the last half-century, has been featuring male protagonists who are past maturity, or, to be downright factual, old. And yet their amatory accomplishments are the stuff of young men's dreams.

‘Dempsey rule’ puts all in danger

The described "Dempsey rule" has never been anything more than "G.I. Jane" played on a loop ("Pressure grows on Marines to consider lowering combat standards for women," Web, April 19). This was prompted by leftist women's activists to prove what cannot be proved. Now, understand that Gen. Martin E. Dempsey is the same man who goose-steps to President Obama's ridiculous commands. If Gen. Dempsey had any honor as an officer or gentleman, he would resign. However, he seems more worried about his stars than his troops. The "Dempsey rule" did prove one thing: Barack Obama and Gen. Dempsey have no qualifications to run experiments. They are nothing more than quacks.

Environmentalists say the delta smelt population has declined because state and federal water pumps suck in and kill smelt, which usually spawn in the delta's upper reaches in spring.

Solar-powered park benches and the delta smelt get their day

America celebrated the planet Wednesday with the gaudy red, white and blue charm guaranteed to turn a tree-hugger green. Earth Day was first observed 45 years ago when most baby boomers were teenagers, and now the candles are dripping all over the birthday cake. It's only natural. Repetition becomes routine, and routine hides the original idea, which is rendered meaningless. It doesn't take a campaign to care for the planet, and some of the Earth Day observances are starting to look a little silly.