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John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Growing the American Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to jump-start the economy

As the presidential debates get underway, we hope that the moderators set personalities aside and spend some quality time asking questions of both candidates about their plans to grow the American economy.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Terrorism, refugees and Donald Trump

Hilary Clinton’s refugee plan is an open invitation for Radical Islam’s unyielding nature to run roughshod over American culture.

Federal Land Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grinding westerners under the federal boot

The federal government owns an estimated one-third of all the land in the United States. But this is only a rough estimate, because even the federal government does not actually know how much land it controls.

Illustration on the contrasting media coverage of Hillary and Trump by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The apoplectic liberals

- The Washington Times

Is it journalistic malpractice to quote each side of the argument and leave it to readers to draw their own conclusions?

A study in nuclear contrast

Astudy in contrast: North Korea is killing itself to get an atomic bomb; Kazakhstan is rich because it gave its nukes away.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we’re getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It’s a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Illustration on two possible economic futures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Liars, statistics and politics

This presidential season Americans have been treated to the usual outrageous campaign promises and extraordinary candidate alibis about past transgressions, but those pale in comparison to claims about gains in family incomes served up by the Obama administration last week.

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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton are introduced during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Presidential debate winners and losers

- The Washington Times

To the probable consternation of his critics, Donald Trump came off as authentic and, compared to Hillary Clinton, the more likable of two much-disliked presidential wannabes in their first head-to-head presidential debate Monday night.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during the presidential debate with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Trump going after Clinton, but on the facts

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is hitting Hillary Clinton on the facts. Yes, he's getting agitated, and raising his voice, and yes, sniffing - but he's being strong, and firm, and not sexist. He's making simple points, that resonate. He's getting in her face like no other Republican would dare, he's interrupting. She's battling him on his ground.

Erdogan no U.S. ally

Ali Cinar scales the heights of absurdity in trying to portray Turkey as a reliable American ally ("Turkey's critical anti-terror role," Web, Sept. 13). Turkey gave the Islamic State and the Nusra Front arms, free passage across the Syrian border, and even hospitals for their wounded. And now we're supposed to believe they're fighting the Islamic State?

Worse off under Obama

Does anyone else find it interesting that President Obama had to reach all the way back 150 years to slavery to find a time in which African-Americans were in a worse situation than they are now, after eight years of his administration ("Obama mocks Trump: Even 8-year-olds know slavery was bad for black people," Web, Sept. 23)?

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, stands with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton before the first presidential debate at Hofstra University, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, in Hempstead, N.Y. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Beyond the debates

We heard a lot of promises Monday night, when Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton at last took the measure of each other face to face. Both the Donald and the gentle lady from the Clinton counting house were trying to show us how they would lead the nation, dispatch the nation's enemies and bestow all the free stuff that voters have come to expect as their due.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Lusitania: The Cultural History of a Catastrophe'

There have been so many books about the sinking by a German submarine of the British liner Lusitania off the Irish coast in May 1915 that you may well ask if we need another. Only the Titanic, felled by an iceberg three years earlier, spawned more books.

Illustration on reviving the war on drugs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Declaring war on drugs, again

Repeat a lie often enough, the saying goes, and it becomes the truth. Take the war on drugs. As you've surely heard in everything from sneering editorials to unsourced memes on Facebook, it was a dismal failure. Heck, it made the problem worse.

Stickers for voters are seen on a table at a polling station Tuesday, April 26, 2016 in Wayne, Pa. Attention is shifting from a well-worn campaign trail to the voting booths as Pennsylvanians cast ballots Tuesday on presidential primary contests, including the first competitive Republican primary in decades, and races for Congress and state offices. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)

Diluting the vote

It's easy to feel lost in a nation of 320 million. But it's the strength and glory of the American way that the least among us has a say, no smaller and no bigger than anyone else, with a vote on Election Day.

Economic Education Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Separating economic sense and nonsense

Why is it that many politicians and journalists can quickly grasp the idea that if the tax on cigarettes or soft drinks with sugar is increased, the demand for them will decline, but seem unable to understand that increasing a tax on labor, like a mandated increase in the minimum wage, will cause a decline in the demand for labor, leading to higher unemployment?

Trump Shadow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

It's time for Donald Trump

Now that all of my inside-the-Beltway, elitist, morally superior friends and colleagues have weighed in with their self-righteous denunciations of Donald Trump, it's my turn.