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President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

A large component of the Obama administration's climate-change agenda is to restrict carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. Washington regulators set a goal of reducing CO2 emissions 30 percent by 2030, which would mostly target abundant and affordable coal-fired generation. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Global climate policy after Lima

In his State of the Union address, President Obama again confirmed that “saving the climate” remains one of his top priorities. Yet the recently concluded confab in Lima, Peru, didn’t really conclude anything — certainly no binding protocol to limit emissions of carbon dioxide — but “kicked the can down the road” to the next international gabfest in Paris, scheduled for December.

Illustration on the impact of anti-Semitism on France by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘First they came for the Jews’

A widely distributed political cartoon by Ranan Lurie, published after the massacre of four Jews in a kosher supermarket in Paris, depicts a tiny shrub above ground and just below the surface, supporting the plant, is a web of thick twisted roots spread in the design of the swastika.

If you peered into your neighbor's bedroom with a high-tech device, you'd be prosecuted or sued.  MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY; NO SALES

Who will keep our freedoms safe?

While the Western world was watching and grieving over the slaughter in Paris last week, and my colleagues in the media were fomenting a meaningless debate about whether President Obama should have gone to Paris to participate in a televised parade, the feds took advantage of that diversion to reveal even more incursions into our liberties than we had known about.

Related Articles

Image from the Public Religion Research Institute

53 percent of Americans say God rewards 'athletes of faith' with good health, success on the field

- The Washington Times

Sunday is often associated with both church and devoted football watching. Now there's an intersection of the two: 53 percent of Americans and 56 percent of sports fans say "that God rewards athletes who have faith with good health and success on the playing field." So says a new survey of public sentiment about sports and religion conducted by the nonpartisan Public Religion Research Institute and the Religion News Service.

"Intelligent' computer keyboard can identify users by the pattern of their key taps. (American Chemical Society)

True cybersecurity: 'Intelligent' computer keyboard identifies users by pattern of their key taps

- The Washington Times

Protective computer passwords have some competition. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a novel intelligent computer keyboard that not only cleans itself - but can identify users by the pattern and style of their fingertips and keystrokes. The "human-machine interfacing" device, reported in the American Chemical Society's academic journal "Nano," could provide a foolproof way to prevent unauthorized users from gaining direct access to computers.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie attends a gathering to announce that Seton Hall University and the parent company of Hackensack University Medical Center are planning to build a private medical school, Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, in Nutley, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Chris Christie on 'last-ditch effort' to regain his mystique, says New Jersey analyst

- The Washington Times

He was once intensely popular, and his signature style wooed the media and voters both in and out of his home state. Those who watch him closely think New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is about to lose his mojo. "It's been fascinating to see the Christie strategy unfold over the past two years. It's been a bit like watching a ping pong match," says one New Jersey pollster

Chloe Kim competes during the women's snowboarding superpipe final at the Dew Tour iON Mountain Championships in Breckenridge, Colo.  (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Snow jobs in the mountains

Once upon a time the inquisitive and the young, the reckless and the incurably naive wore their convictions on the rear bumpers of their Volkswagen Beetles: "Question authority." Time marches on. Now those purveyors of rebellion have become the authority, and they want no further questions. "Shut up," they advise.

Diseased and indebted

President Obama's State of the Union this week was an entirely appropriate speech for a country on the brink of collapse ("The state of the president," Comment & Analysis, Jan. 21). It was once again a diversion for short-term political gain.

President Obama gives his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Three cheers for gridlock

Gridlock became a dirty word in Washington after the Republicans regained the majority in the House of Representatives and stood in the path of the invader from Fantasy Island, shouting "Stop!" The president wanted a rubber stamp, and the Democrats agreed, demanding of the Republicans, "Why can't you be like us?"

How animal rights activists doomed ‘Free Willy’

The film "Free Willy" captured the imagination of viewers in 1993 with a story detailing a young boy's desire to free a killer whale named "Willy" from captivity in an amusement park. At the end of the film, Willy swims off to freedom. But the inspirational film bears little resemblance to reality, according to Mark Simmons, author of "Killing Keiko: The True Story of Free Willy's Return to the Wild."

Texas Gov. Rick Perry delivers a farewell speech to a joint session of the Texas Legislature, Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Rick Perry to speak at CPAC in February - emphasizing 'ideas and opportunity'

- The Washington Times

CPAC will welcome former Texas Gov. Rick Perry in their speakers lineup at the annual gathering of conservatives in February, The Washington Times has learned. "If 2014 taught us anything, it's that Americans are looking for a positive vision for this country, and 2016 will be no different. Republicans have the chance to be the party of ideas and opportunity," says Mr. Perry.

Illustration on Obama's continued burdening of the American economic middle class by Linas Garsys/The Washington times

Obama's problem with income inequality

While liberals increasingly bemoan "income inequality," they assign President Obama no responsibility for it. Mr. Obama fully embraced his exoneration in his State of the Union address, showcasing the issue as though he had never been president — despite having been in office six years, being America's most liberal president, having greatly expanded his presidential powers, and unsparingly expended the nation's resources attempting to accomplish his agenda. Exploring the connection between Mr. Obama and income inequality reveals a good deal, and even more about the liberals who are not exploring it.

Obama no threat to terrorists

Aside from the occasional lone-wolf attack here at home, I am not convinced that a coordinated terrorist assault is imminent inside the United States. While terror cells are no doubt inside our country, why activate them now and provoke a nation with a president who is weak and sympathetic to their cause? By skipping out on the recent Paris rally, President Obama has sent our enemies the message that should they unleash mayhem throughout Europe the response from the United States will be as anemic as it has been elsewhere.