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Rosa Luxemburg (Associated Press)

Black Lives Matter and the endless war against the Jews

- The Washington Times

The man who controls the language controls the conversation, as George Orwell rightly observed. The word that the left is trying, with a certain success, to appropriate now is “genocide.” Genocide is what Hitler set out to do, to exterminate Europe’s Jews (and who knows where his evil ambition would have gone from there).

Federal Mismanagement of the Peanut Industry Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Politicians and peanut pilfering

The history of federal peanut policy is the perfect antidote to anyone who still believes that Congress could competently manage a lemonade stand. Federal spending for peanut subsidies will rise eight-fold between last year and next year — reaching almost a billion dollars and approaching the total value of the peanut harvest. This debacle is only the latest pratfall in a long history of horrendous federal mismanagement.

Hillary at the helm

- The Washington Times

”At long last,” she thinks. “My time has come. They’re now all here, fighting for me.”

Texas Bullet Train Project Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How private enterprise drives the trains

Texans are turning the tables on how to pay for nationally critical infrastructure projects, leading the way with a high-speed train project that relies on the expertise of private entrepreneurs instead of government money.

Law Enforcement at the Border Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Immigration reform must start with border enforcement

As a veteran border patrol officer, I can say without any reservations that our immigration system is completely dysfunctional. Immigrants permitted to come to the United States have a cumbersome and expensive time doing so. Those who aren’t permitted to enter waltz across the border by the tens of thousands, and those not allowed to remain here elude deportations, even after committing serious crimes against our citizens.

Palestinian Hamas supporters hold up their hands while chanting Islamic slogans as masked members from the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, a military wing of Hamas, march with their weapons on vehicles during a rally a long the street of Rafah refugee camp, Gaza Strip, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

The next round of Hamas vs. Israel

Words can bewitch. Soon, the seemingly benign phrase “cycle of violence,” will be applied once again to the Hamas-Israel conflict. The linguistic effect of this application will be to equate terrorism and counterterrorism, further blurring the always-essential distinction between international crime and international law enforcement.

Elmar Abdullayev, 55, stands at a gates of his home hit by shelling in a village of Gapinli, in Terter region of Azerbaijan on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. Azerbaijan and separatist forces in Nagorno-Karabakhk on Tuesday agreed on a cease-fire starting noon local time following three days of the heaviest fighting in the disputed region since 1994, the Azeri defense ministry announced. Gapanli, a village south of Terter, has been one of the hardest hit. Houses bear the marks of the recent shelling; metal doors are riddled with shrapnel, power lines are cut down, craters are seen in the yards. (AP Photo/ Hicran Babayev)

An ‘unfrozen’ conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh

Recently, one of Vladimir Putin’s foreign policy functionaries made another outrageous statement on the status of the Azerbaijani region of Nagorno-Karabakh. Evgeniy Satanovsky, the head of Russian Institute of the Near East, visited the separatist region (in contravention of international law) in mid-June and declared: “As I understand it, the issue that Karabakh is part of Azerbaijan, in terms of military logic and from the standpoint of practical politics is completely closed.”

Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they’re watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to “other” the world’s only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia’s McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

Overheated concern about July’s warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the “hottest” month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, “ever”). And future Julys will only become hotter.

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Guido Tardive, of Mine Hill, N.J., a supporter of Republican Donald Trump for President, stands with his painted car Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, in Randolph, N.J. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) ** FILE **

Donald Trump's real supporters and Hillary Clinton's myth of the alt-right

- The Washington Times

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton -- because she doesn't have a record to run on (unless you count her pay-to-play success with the Clinton Foundation) -- decided to attack her GOP rival Donald Trump as racist on Thursday, and perhaps even more disheartening, cast his supporters as white supremacists, neo-Nazi's as well.

Former New Mexico governor, Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson arrives to a cheering crowd of several hundred during a campaign rally Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Protest without a point

The successful presidential candidate has to assemble a coalition with others with overlapping but rarely identical desires and interests, which means his most ardent partisans naturally see him as imperfect and inconsistent. Voters, alas, rarely get to choose between a candidate they admire unreservedly and a candidate they don't like at all.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Peacock and Vine: On William Morris and Mariano Fortuny'

At the beginning of "Peacock and Vine," A.S. Byatt describes a visit to the Museo Fortuny in Venice. As she gloried in the watery aquamarine light of the city she writes, "I found I was thinking about the Englishman William Morris. I was using Morris ... to understand Fortuny."

Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures as he speaks during an awarding ceremony for Russia's Olympians in Moscow's Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday attacked the ban on his country from the Rio de Janeiro Paralympics as immoral and inhumane. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

The changing Scandinavian tune

There's nothing like a slap across the face, or a splash of icy water, to get a sleepyhead's instant attention. Finland, like Sweden, has prized its neutrality, often with a self-righteous smirk at the rest of the West. But reality has wiped the smirk away.

Fund missile defense system now

The simple fact that North Korea is developing nuclear weapons, no matter how far along it is in the process, calls into question how secure our country really is ("Fourth North Korean nuclear test shows need for harsh, sustained sanctions — not diplomacy," Web, Aug. 22).

'Petticoat politics' is still a dangerous game

Sexual politics is always a slippery game. Democrats are salivating at the possibility of winning the White House with Hillary Clinton. They're enamored of the wide female gender gap in her favor. (Nobody says very much about the male gender gap running the other way.)

Incentive to Press the Reset Button Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Vladimir Putin, Hillary Clinton and the guns of August

- The Washington Times

The guns of August -- a phrase first used to describe the outbreak of World War I -- is a real phenomenon. Maybe it's the heat, but there's something about the eighth month that seems to inspire armed conflict. Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait in August 1990.