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This is a copy of the cover of the CIA torture report released by Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein D-Calif., Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014. U.S. Senate investigators delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogations Tuesday, accusing the spy agency of inflicting suffering on prisoners beyond its legal limits and peddling unsubstantiated stories that the harsh questioning saved American lives.  (AP Photo)

The truth about the CIA, torture, and congressional ingratitude

The truth – that enhanced interrogations saved lives, frightened other terrorists to not act, uncovered plots, and showed any al Qaeda wannabees that joining in would have serious personal consequences – is completely missing from the Senate Democrats’ report.

Blind Partisanship Donkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ wasteful torture report

The recent release of a Senate report commissioned by Democrats regarding torture of terrorism suspects in order to obtain vital information was, in my opinion, a waste of $40 million of taxpayer money.

FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2014 file photo, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, after Senate Democrats voted on leadership positions for the 114th Congress.  Two years after first being elected to the Senate, Warren had a notable sophomore year, winning a leadership role and making her first official overseas trip, even as her party lost control of the Senate. From left are, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Warren, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The Democratic divide

The liberal news media have been gleefully reporting the GOP’s political quarrels for many years. That exaggerated storyline all but vanished last week, though, in the aftermath of the Democrats’ humiliating defeats in the midterm elections.

"Bumpering" Hillary 2016 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pining for Elizabeth Warren

Barack Obama is so yesterday. The elitists who supported him as the great “progressive” hope are abandoning him in droves as his popularity plummets. The Washington Post describes him as having the “worst” year of anyone in Washington, and as Republicans prepare to take over the Senate, he looks more and more like a lame duck incapable of delivering much more of anything to his base.

Illustration on the need for enhanced interrogation for national security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

America needs its rough men

In spring 2009, I was invited to debate “torture” with Jon Stewart on “The Daily Show.” He gave me an opportunity to make a case with which he vehemently disagreed. He didn’t spout prepackaged sound bites — he presented thoughtful counterarguments. Not many television talk show hosts are willing — or able — to do that.

Karl Rove, a personable fellow who was deputy chief of staff in George W. Bush's White House and is sometimes credited with being the genius of George W.'s success, turns out to be a big fan of "rectal feeding," as used by the CIA to persuade terror suspects to spill their secrets.  (Associated Press/File)

Be careful who takes you to lunch

- The Washington Times

Lunch can sometimes be a big deal in Washington. Lunch is where alliances are struck, deals are made, and sometimes where foes become more or less friends over a shrimp cocktail or a chicken salad at the Palm. But if Karl Rove invites you to lunch, be sure you get to pick the restaurant.

Illustration on Saudi Arabia's strategic use of its oil supply by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Saudis allow falling oil prices to squeeze archrival Iran

Conventional wisdom in Western capitals holds that Saudi Arabia has held firm in sessions with its OPEC partners against lowering production — which would restore higher prices — in order to maintain its market share in countries belonging to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and to dissuade investors from pouring more money into growing North American shale and tar sands production.

Illustration on the failings of Common Core by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Common Core doesn’t make the grade

It’s one thing to experience “buyer’s remorse” when the product is something you can return easily, from new clothes to a set of high-end speakers. It’s another when you’re talking about your state’s educational standards. Yet more and more states are finding that there’s simply no living with Common Core. Parents, teachers, students and lawmakers have become increasingly vocal in their criticism of the federally backed standards — and more and more of them are taking action.

Socialist policies undoing success of South America’s strongest economy

Why do very successful nations often adopt policies that lead to their undoing? After a revolution or major reform, some countries allow a high degree of economic freedom, establish the rule of law, protect private property rights and establish low tax rates with strict limits on government spending and regulation. The economy takes off, the citizens become far richer and then the government mucks it up, usually by attempting to redistribute income and expand state control.

Illustration on Obamacare's mandate to share medical records with multiple government agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Another Obamacare blow to personal privacy

Get ready to fight back: Last week, the Health and Human Services Department announced a plan to share your medical records with over 35 federal agencies — all in the name of “health care,” of course. All in the name of “efficiency,” the favorite excuse used by fascists wherever they appear.

Illustration on impending EPA regulatory takeover of U.S. "waterways" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A vast land grab to ‘protect’ water

In November, comments closed on a proposal by the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to redefine “waters of the United States,” as set forth in the Clean Water Act of 1977. While Sen. Edmund Muskie, Maine Democrat, author of the 1977 law, required 88 pages for his entire statute, this spring’s Federal Register notice ran 370 pages, not counting appendixes, one of which hit 300 pages alone. Little wonder the new “wetland” rules have generated controversy and a likely Supreme Court case.

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**FILE** The United Nations headquarters building is seen July 27, 2007, in New York. (Associated Press)

Timor stands up, international elites say sit down

Timor told the international community it was ready to make its own way and that all UN/international types should leave. The elites hate such self-sufficiency.

"The Skeleton Road" by Val McDermid. Book jacket courtesy Grove Atlantic.

Who’s the corpse in the Edinburgh pinnacle?

Atragedy embedded in a love story is vividly relived in the setting of the brutal Balkan wars in this gripping and expertly plotted thriller.

President Obama (Associated Press)

A dog whistle by the master

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has the master wordsmith's gift for bending language, saying something that sounds good, but heard as something not so good.

Sen. Jim Webb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Jim Webb, a maverick with a message

It's going to be easy — and fun for some — to dismiss the presidential candidacy of former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb, if he actually decides to run.

Bargain-hunting motorists willing to drive to another state can save up to 10 percent on Black Friday shopping.(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

When black turns to blue

Black Friday bargain hunters are scouring circulars and combing through websites in search of ways to save on Christmas shopping, and many of them are missing a bargain they could get by driving to shops and stores in states with low — or no — sales taxes.

Renting government workers

Union membership has fallen, but the impact of public-sector unions on federal politics still seems as strong as ever. How could this be? It sounds like a mystery, but it isn't.

Illustration on a coalition government for Libya by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Opening the door to a peaceful Libya

We all remember how in February 2011 the Arab Spring reached Libya, and Libyans came together to overthrow a 42-year-old dictatorship that crushed any semblance of democracy, freedom and free will.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: No justice for the unborn?

I am utterly amazed by the protests and violence perpetrated by some people over the recent grand jury decision not to indict Officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. ("Legal scholars praise Ferguson grand jury for fairness beyond the norm," Web, Nov. 25).

Congress Controls Purse Strings to Neutralize Executive Orders Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The coming Washington war

If you thought the bare-knuckled, no-holds-barred, midterm elections were rough, the last two years of Barack Obama's presidency will make that look like a Sunday school picnic.

An attitude of gratitude

Is there anything in the world that can stop the United States of America? We were born struggling against the British Empire — the most powerful entity at the time — and we totally wiped the floor with those crumpet-gobblers.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Walt Kelly's Pogo: The Complete Dell Comics'

Hermes Press, an American publisher that specializes in comic book reprints, has started collecting the extensive run of "Pogo" at Dell Comics. The first two hardcover volumes have been released, and they are exceptional.

The Godspeed, a re-creation of one of the three ships that brought AmericaÕs first permanent English colonists to Virginia in 1607 has sailed up from the Jamestown Settlement History Museum and docked near the Alexandria City Marina, adjacent to Founders Park and will be open to the public from October 4-9, Old Town Alexandria, VA, October 4,  2011. (Andrew Harnik / The Washington Times)

For a real Thanksgiving story, look to Virginia

- The Washington Times

After Sir Thomas Dale implemented a system of private property to take the place of communal farming and equal distribution, the colony flourished. By the time he left Virginia three years later, the colony had grown by hundreds of people and the settlers were well-fed and in good spirits.

Illustration: Thanksgiving prayer by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

Grand'ther Baldwin's Thanksgiving

When you've dined at Grandma Baldwin's you will know as well as I. When, at length, the feast was ended, Grand'ther Baldwin bent his head, And, amid the solemn silence, with a reverent voice, he said: "Now unto God, the Gracious One, we thanks and homage pay, Who guardeth us, and guideth us, and loveth us always!"

A soldier races on the field with the American flag as part of the salute to service pregame activities at the NFL football game between the San Diego Chargers and against the Oakland Raiders Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy)

Thanksgiving spirit for our military

The military has a long tradition of celebrating Thanksgiving both at home and abroad. Military leaders will express their appreciation and gratitude for the sacrifice and service of members within their commands by serving Thanksgiving meals in dining facilities across the globe.