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Members of the Oakland Raiders take a knee while others stand during the national anthem. (Associated Press)

Once upon a knee at the old ball game

- The Washington Times

There’s a lunatic in Asia credibly threatening the world with a hydrogen bomb. Congress can’t pull itself together to do anything. But enough of that. We’re all obsessed now with what a few tubby athletes think about the flag, the national anthem and the country others have shed blood and lives to defend and protect.

Illustration on the broken ideology of Socialism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

If oppression could inspire happiness

It is a fair bet that Sen. Bernie Sanders (and most of his followers), unlike tens of millions of others, never read George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” or Friedrich von Hayek’s “The Road to Serfdom.” Why do so many embrace a system — socialism — that has always failed, whether it was a form of state socialism or the various utopian communities started in the United States and Europe over the last couple of hundred years?

This Aug. 21, 2017, file photo shows members of the Cleveland Browns kneeling during the national anthem before an NFL preseason football game between the New York Giants and the Cleveland Browns in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, file)

NFL politics, a test for the media — and a solution

- The Washington Times

If NFL players have a right to on-field free expressions of speech, then that means pro-life players can take a knee during the playing of the national anthem to show solidarity with all the babies who could have been, save for America’s legal rubber-stamp of abortion.

Democrat Thumb on the Scale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fuzzy polls that trash Trump

- The Washington Times

How soon they forget. Heartened by a stream of poll data suggesting that the public is less than enamored with his performance as president, Donald Trump’s critics who’ve been taken in by polls before seem to think they have the man on the ropes.

Illustration on the Vietnam War     The Washington Times

The Vietnam War revisited

Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary “The Vietnam War” for the Public Broadcasting Service. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were a half-century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation.

The Al Gore Twister Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Alarmism in climate reporting

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, many members of the media and the political left have been quick to pin the blame for these storms on climate change. While there is no question that the hurricanes have wreaked havoc across many communities, including in my home state of Texas, these severe storms are not indicative of a climate trend — despite what the clickbait masters would have us believe.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen closes her notebook after answering questions during a news conference following the Federal Open Market Committee meeting in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Federal Reserve’s handwringing over low inflation

The Federal Reserve has been absolutely flummoxed that inflation has stayed so low for so long. Gasoline prices and headline inflation may be getting a temporary jolt from Harvey, but core inflation — consumer prices less energy and food costs — remains well below the Fed’s official target of 2 percent.

Illustration on the development of technology and political campaigning by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turning up the heat on America’s electioneering

Last year’s election signaled a change in American politics equal to that of the 1960s. The channel for this change was the medium — or rather, media — through which politics now flows. This change in media has brought an evolution in America’s method of communication, and transformed politics as well. The nation can extol it or lament it, but cannot escape it.

In this Sept. 22, 2017, photo President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Huntsville, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

A tax cut for all Americans

When you hear the phrase “corporate tax cut,” what do you picture? Middle-class workers, or Uncle Moneybags, the character from the Monopoly board game?

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Critics call Trump ‘self-interested’ like it’s a bad thing

- The Washington Times

As a businessman, a builder and a real estate tycoon in the most fiercely competitive real estate market on the planet, President Trump has spent his entire life exercising his own considerable self-interest. He built a huge and admirable fortune trying to make a buck for himself.

Illustration on the rise of materialism and anti-religious bigotry on Capitol Hill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hate, Bernie style

Two remarkable things unfolded last week. The Democrats openly embraced socialism in the form of single-payer health care. And they announced a secular, anti-Christian test for public office. The two go together like Abbott and Costello. Or better yet, since this is far from funny, Marx and Lenin.

Illustration on CIA use of drones by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The CIA’s drones fly into a storm

The Central Intelligence Agency’s authority to use lethal force is usually discussed only in the quietest corners of the intelligence community. These authorities are usually implemented pursuant to carefully-prescribed top-secret “presidential determinations” that authorize specific actions.

Justin Kandor Causing Trouble in New Hampshire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Some New Hampshire candor about Jason Kander

Let America Vote founder Jason Kander is a smirking menace. The former Missouri secretary of state wants to come to New Hampshire, cast aspersions on our elections, and use his wokeness as a springboard to bigger things.

Related Articles

Illustration on North Korea's martial mentality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Countering North Korea's nuclear blackmail

North Korea's official statements following its recent underground nuclear test for the first time revealed plans to use its nuclear weapons to create an electromagnetic pulse (EMP).

Illustration on improving the U.N. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Fixing the United Nations

The United Nations was created in the wake of World War II by the major Allied nations that had prevailed -- at an enormous cost in blood and treasure -- over the Axis powers. Its founders proclaimed ambitious goals: to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war," "reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights" and "promote social progress." That the U.N. hasn't come close to succeeding should, by now, be obvious.

Illustration on negotiating with North Korea by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putting North Korea over a barrel

The theme of this year's 72nd session of the U.N. General Assembly is a world "striving for peace." This meeting of 193 member states comes at a time when one of its members, North Korea, is threatening nuclear conflict.

Love and arson on the Eastern Shore

What does it take to make a silk purse from a sow's ear? A silkworm and a needle. What does it take to make a mad-crime story into an elegiac page-turner? A writer with a police reporter's calloused grasp of gritty facts, a farmer's dogged patience and a silken touch at the keyboard.

Let Taiwan into Interpol

Interpol is the world's largest international police organization, with the role to enable police around the world to work together to make the world a safer place. The 86th Interpol General Assembly will be held Sept. 26-29, 2017, in Beijing.

Destroyed trailers are seen at the Seabreeze trailer park along the Overseas Highway in the Florida Keys on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017. Florida is cleaning up and embarking on rebuilding from Hurricane Irma, one of the most destructive hurricanes in its history. (Al Diaz/Miami Herald via AP)

Lessons from the storm

The lasting effect of two hurricanes, Harvey and Irma, may be settling the fundamental argument about climate change, although neither side in that bitter and costly dispute recognizes it just yet.

Two American astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joseph Acaba, together with Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin, were launched on a mission to the International Space Station using Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft.

Message to Washington and Moscow from Space

Let's assume that after Special Counsel Robert Mueller and numerous Congressional committees have spent tens of millions of taxpayers' dollars they finally find smoking gun, i.e. indisputable proof of the Kremlin's hack into the Clinton campaign's and the DNC's emails, plus other attempts to influence the outcome of the U.S. presidential election. Then what?

A view of the Florida Keys during the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Christians beat FEMA, and in so doing, tame Big Government

- The Washington Times

Faith-based groups -- Christian nonprofits, specifically -- have been busy bees of late, providing more aid to hurricane victims than even FEMA, the federal agency that's supposed to swoop to the scenes of natural disasters, assess the situation and speed the recovery and rebuilding process. Just goes to show: Where charity exists, government is not needed.

Illustration on corruption in Italy's support of refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Mafia and the migrants

I spotted them on my way to dinner with a friend near Castel Gandolfo. They are migrants from Africa, sitting by the side of the road outside a "temporary" residence that, for many, appears to have become permanent. They all have cellphones. They all seem oblivious to us as we pass by.