Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

U.S. manufacturing jobs illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Returning to ‘Made in the USA’

Now that the presidential race is in full swing, it’s time for robust talking about issues and creating awareness about problems, which only seem to come to light when the American public is focused choosing a new national leader.

Illustration on corruption behind Cover Oregon by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Adding corruption to Obamacare incompetence

Deception and unaccountability have plagued Obamacare from the start. First, millions of Americans found out that, contrary to promises, they couldn’t keep the health insurance plans they liked. Then a botched website rollout spoiled the law’s enrollment debut. Now, in the law’s first real tax season, the federal government sent 800,000 enrollees incorrect tax forms.

Plane passengers murdered illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When evil flies as co-pilot

Ask yourself this question: When you hear that Andreas Lubitz was “depressed” and had “mental illness,” what additional information does this give anyone about the miserable miscreant who killed 149 innocent people by setting an Airbus A320 on a trajectory to crash into the French Alps? Or how to stop the next one?

Illustration on the waning of sexual political scandals by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sex among the goofballs

What is going on in American politics of late? There has not emerged a truly goofball politician since Anthony Weiner, the congressman and later New York mayoral candidate who could not resist sending pictures of his private part so frequently and to so many women, that it really was no longer a private part but rather a public spectacle. Go ahead, Google it. In fact, Yahoo it. My guess is there are dozens of pictures of Mr. Weiner’s public private part all over the Internet.

Illustration on Iran's greater ambitions in the Middle East by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Satrapy fishing in the Yemen

Three years ago, film-goers were treated to “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen,” which critic Kenneth Turan called a “pleasant fantasy” about the Middle East. Today, of course, Yemen is the hub of a bloody conflict, one which President Obama persists in viewing with equal unreality.

The Internal Revenue Service Headquarters (IRS) building is seen in Washington on April 13, 2014. Unscrupulous tax preparers are using President Obama's health care law as a ploy to pocket bogus fines from unsuspecting taxpayers, including some immigrants not bound by the law's requirements, the IRS warned March 13, 2015. (Associated Press)

Ax the income tax

The most efficient solution would junk income taxes altogether in favor of a simple national sales tax.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, waves to members of the audience before speaking at an event hosted by the Center for American Progress (CAP) and the America Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), Monday, March 23, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

They’re ready for Hillary, but is Hillary ready?

- The Washington Times

The Syndicate convened the Bilderberg Group, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Illuminati and the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy over the weekend at a secret hideaway in downtown Shangri-la to talk about themes for the 2016 campaign.

Trust but verify illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When even ‘trust but verify’ won’t do

If the United States cannot verify that Iran isn’t developing nuclear weapons, then President Obama swears he won’t strike a deal with Tehran. This week, though, he seems hell-bent on doing precisely that, despite lingering questions about Iranian cheating. It is enough to drive a good man to distraction. Former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton even argued in an editorial last week that we should bomb Iran ourselves before the Israelis beat us to the punch.

Illustration on the death of Terri Schiavo by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terri Schiavo’s inconvenient life

I spent the night of March 30, 2005, in a Florida hospice. I was at the bedside of Terri Schiavo during the last 14 hours of her earthly life, right up until five minutes before her death. During that time with Terri, joined by her brother and sister, I told Terri over and over that she had many friends around the country, many people who were praying for her and were on her side. I told her the same thing during my visits to her in the months before her feeding tube was removed. I am convinced she understood.

Lifting the covers on ‘Obamoogle’

During this past week as we’ve been swamped with bad news pouring out of every corner of the globe, it wouldn’t be surprising if you missed one of the more shocking revelations about White House actions that would make even Richard Nixon blush.

Chart to accompany Moore article March 30, 2015

Not hard at work but hardly working

The great conundrum of the U.S. economy today is that we have record numbers of working-age Americans out of the labor force at the same time we have businesses desperately trying to find workers. For example, the American Transportation Research Institute estimates there are about 35,000 trucker jobs that could be filled tomorrow if workers would take these jobs — a shortage that could rise to 240,000 by 2022.

Phasing out renewable energy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pulling the plug on renewable energy

There is never a good time for bad public policy. For few policies is this more evident than renewable energy mandates (REM), variously known as renewable portfolio standards, alternative energy standards and renewable energy standards.

Illustration on Putin's designs on eastern Europe BY Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Russia’s grab for its neighbors

A bipartisan consensus is emerging that the United States should do more to address Russia’s continuing aggression against Ukraine. But Russian revanchism does not begin or end with Ukraine, nor are “little green men” its only foreign policy instrument. Moscow is actively engaged in subversive activities along Europe’s eastern flank, targeting the region’s economic and political stability. As Central European capitals grow increasingly concerned, Washington urgently needs to demonstrate its robust commitment not just to the region’s security but to its democratic future.

Related Articles

A Secret Service officer and Secret Service agents provide security as Marine One carries President Barack Obama off the South Lawn of the White House, on Thursday, March 12, 2015, in Washington. Obama to traveling to Los Angeles for an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live, and a DNC fundraiser. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

No time for ‘boys will be boys’

The days of the Secret Service agent as superhero are long gone. Instead of men like Clint Hill flying into the back seat of the Kennedy motorcade to protect the first lady after the assassination in Dallas, or of the stoic agents of a later time who surrounded Ronald Reagan with their bodies and got him to safety after John Hinckley's failed assassination attempt, the men of today's security detail appear to be rude, raucous, unfocused college frat boys.

Martin O'Malley (Associated Press)

Trifling with the iron rule of politics

- The Washington Times

Conventional wisdom teaches that nothing succeeds like success, but the unwary politician forgets the more important Pruden Rule, which reflects both politics and life: "Nothing recedes like success." Conventional wisdom is made of two parts gossamer and one part each of fog and smoke. The Pruden Rule is cast iron.

** FILE ** Former U.N. Ambassador John R. Bolton (Associated Press)

John Bolton back in action, endorsing three 'national security' candidates

- The Washington Times

The man who endorsed 87 "national security" candidates and donated close to $500,000 during the 2014 midterms is back in action. Former United Nations ambassador John Bolton announced Thursday that he was backing Sen. David Vitter of Louisiana in his gubernatorial quest in the state; Rep. Ron DeSantis, the incumbent Congressman from Florida's 6th district, and Dr. Paul Chabot, candidate for Congress in California's 31st district.

Just-cut stacks of $100 bills make their way down the production line at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing's Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Billionaires? The world has 1,826 of them - and 541 live in America

- The Washington Times

There’s lots of billionaires out there — 1,826, to be exact, according to recent painstaking research of Forbes magazine. Mote than a third prefer the urbane and urban life, and the Big Apple is the town of choice. The publication says that with 78 resident billionaires, New York City has the largest uber-rich population on the planet. But wait, there’s more.

Intentional trashing of the Constitution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The president's constitutional end run for Iran

Congress is struggling to thwart President Obama's attempt to strike a nuclear deal with Iran on his own, in violation of the Constitution. Lawmakers are taking unprecedented measures — the invitation to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Corker-Menendez bill, and even a letter to Tehran to stop it. None of this would be necessary if the U.S. Senate had done its job instead of rubber-stamping John Kerry's nomination as secretary of state.

In this image made from video posted on a social media account affiliated with the Islamic State group on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, militants take sledgehammers to an ancient artifact in the Ninevah Museum in Mosul, Iraq. The extremist group has destroyed a number of shrines --including Muslim holy sites -- in order to eliminate what it views as heresy. The militants are also believed to have sold ancient artifacts on the black market in order to finance their bloody campaign across the region. (AP Photo via militant social media account)

Destruction in civilization’s cradle

Trashing antiquities and traces of early civilization is so easy a caveman can do it. Steeped in ruinous belief, the cavemen of the Islamic State are adding to their criminal rampage across the Middle East, smashing and looting the priceless artifacts made by their ancestors in a more constructive era.

A before and after facelift on a 67-year-old man. (ASAPS photo)

'Dramatic' increase: Plastic surgery for men up by 43 percent as they compete in the job market

- The Washington Times

The vanity business appears is flourishing. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery announced Thursday that Americans spent over $12 billion on assorted procedures in 2014. One sector is on the increase. "More men are turning to aesthetic cosmetic procedures, with dramatic increases seen in both surgical and nonsurgical options over the past 5 years and a 43 percent increase overall," the organization stated.

A Likely Exhibit at the Obama Presidential Library Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A presidential library for Obama's fairy tales

Sometime this month, the Barack Obama Foundation will likely announce the specific site of the president's library. It's expected to be in Chicago, but that's not the big news. Rather, the 14th presidential library, like the 44th occupant of the White House, will probably be the most controversial because it will stray so far from the aims of the original one begun by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1939. At that time, FDR donated his personal and presidential papers to the federal government, even pledging part of his estate in Hyde Park, New York, for the site.

Left back by class warfare

Three recent developments should have had President Obama and liberals everywhere grinding their teeth.

No more Clinton presidencies

The very last thing America needs is President Hillary Rodham Clinton. Her entire tenure as secretary of state was a disaster that has left the world in ruins. And who can forget her years as first lady (millennials fortunately missed it), during which she declared herself "Queen Hillary" and ordered Secret Service to keep out of her sight as she walked the halls of the White House?

Illustration on the funding of green anti-oil campaigns by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Overseas money buys more than just Hillary

The news that several foreign governments, including Saudi Arabia, gave millions to the Clinton Foundation, including donations while Hillary Clinton was secretary of state, has riled up Republicans. But if congressional Republicans want to hold hearings, they shouldn't limit the subject to Hillaryland. Foreign money isn't exclusive to the Clintons, and it may be coming into more serious play in influencing U.S. energy policy.

Crossing the aisle — and their fingers

The 2014 midterm election is now historic not for the margin of victory, but for the magnitude of GOP betrayal. The newly elected and empowered GOP-controlled House and Senate hold nearly as much contempt for the Constitution as they seem to hold for their voters, embracing ignominy more quickly than their broken campaign promises.

Hillary Rodham Clinton answers questions at a news conference at the United Nations, Tuesday, March 10, 2015.   Clinton conceded that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of "convenience."  (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

The saboteur of Hillary’s ambitions

Hillary Clinton has been a reflection of the changing images of women in America for decades. She's had more reincarnations than Shirley MacLaine, more fashion makeovers than Cher, more comebacks from bad press than Madonna. The images always need updating. She's the life-size balloon toy, weighted at the bottom, that a child smacks over and watches with surprise and suspicion when it bobs back upright.

Republicans, keep promise to voters

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Kentucky Republican, continues to capitulate to President Obama and Sen. Harry Reid because he doesn't want to chance Republicans being held responsible for any government shutdown. He has done this for the budget and declared he will do it again for raising the debt ceiling. Mr. McConnell neglects to recall, apparently, the November 2014 election results that put Republicans in charge of the House and the Senate.