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Donald Trump (Associated Press)

The Donald tries out for the team

- The Washington Times

Now even Donald Trump is taking himself seriously. He’s trying now to be colorful without being reckless, careful not to be rude when he doesn’t have to be, and playing less the showboat and more like someone trying out for the team.

Illustration on Hillary's redacted classified emails by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton redacted

It is clear by now that a large number of Hillary Clinton’s emails that she sent or received on her private computer system contained classified information.

Illustration critical of Saudi Arabia's human rights record by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Confronting Saudi repression

Of all Washington’s embarrassing friends, few are more troubling than the king of Saudi Arabia, who will meet President Obama on Friday.

Criticism of Azerbaijan by the United States Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Misrepresenting Azerbaijan

Over the last several years, the Republic of Azerbaijan, widely acknowledged and praised for its commitment and pursuit of religious tolerance, has become a target of harsh criticism by the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIF).

Behind the Eight Ball Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Blaming white racism for violence

Last week, reporter Alison Parker and photojournalist Adam Ward — both white — were murdered in cold blood on television by Vester Lee Flanigan, a black man.

Obama Legacy: Ex-patriots Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How expatriates are forging an Obama legacy

The State Department recently announced that a record number of Americans in 2014 gave up their citizenship and decided to live elsewhere. Last year’s figure of 3,415 was a 14 percent increase over the previous record, 2,999, in 2013.

Illustration on the National Zoo pandas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What the ‘Save the Pandas’ campaign reveals

For years, the National Zoo has come under fire, including in a blistering 2013 Congressional report over gross negligence, a scathing 2004 National Academy of Sciences report into animal deaths at the zoo and, somewhere in between, an investigation revealing that the zoo had disposed of some wild animals by sending them to a canned hunting outfit and to a petting zoo.

Laws Protecting Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When comprehensive legislation is counterproductive

The announcement by the House Republican leadership that the Innovation Act (H.R. 9) will not be scheduled for a vote this summer has the bill’s supporters concerned but not yet alarmed.

Illustration on the one percent and the American dream by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The American Dream lives

The American Dream couldn’t be more alive but there are those promoting class warfare who are certainly trying to kill it off. A recent Gallup poll (May 2015) shows that 63 percent of those polled feel that wealth and money should be more evenly distributed in America.

Related Articles

Let consumers dictate energy mix

In his column "Free consumers from renewable power mandates" (Web, Aug. 6) Thaddeus McCotter raises a valid point regarding states that have chosen to scale back or freeze their renewable-energy mandates. Such actions don't constitute opposition to renewables. "Rather," As Mr. McCotter writes, "Policymakers are concluding that consumer choice and the market will maximize renewable use more efficiently than government fiat."

Dissident diss

Secretary of State John Kerry has taken a lot of heat for refusing to invite Cuban dissidents to today's official flag-raising ceremony at the U.S. Embassy ("Cuba dissidents won't attend U.S. Embassy event," Web, Aug. 12). His justification has been that that there is not enough room to accommodate all the guests. This is disgraceful.

A helicopter makes a water drop on a wildfire in Angeles National Forest above Azusa, Calif., Friday, Aug. 14, 2015. Wildfires racing through drought-stricken Southern California have burned hundreds of acres of land and multiple cabins as the region roasted under a summer heat wave. (Watchara Phomicinda/San Gabriel Valley Tribune via AP) MAGS OUT; NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

Shifting blame for wildfires

Mother Nature is a cruel mistress. Persistent drought in the West has triggered wildfires that have burned over nearly 6 million acres so far this year. Blaming global warming, or capricious "climate change" -- sometimes it's hot and sometimes it's cold, and sometimes it rains and sometimes it doesn't -- is tempting for the environmental extremists.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the at the Iowa Democratic Wing Ding at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

Hillary as comedienne

Hillary Clinton dismisses her email troubles as a joke -- she was having a high old time with it in Iowa the other day -- but there's no evidence that the FBI agents assigned to her case are laughing. Joking about your transgressions while an FBI team is examining your life and times is not smart.

GMO Food and Labeling Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Food labeling, Hollywood-style

The first clue that Gwyneth Paltrow didn't know what she was talking about on Capitol Hill earlier this month came with the first words she spoke: "I'm here as a mother."

Illustration on the Obama/Iran nuclear weapons deal's exclusion of American business from coming commerce with Iran by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Iran deal means game over for U.S. business

If you need another reason to oppose the Iran nuclear deal, the Obama administration has provided it in the fine print. Why would the U.S. government go out of its way to put American business at an internationally competitive disadvantage?

Hillary Clinton (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Hillary Horror Movie, a Sequel

- The Washington Times

You almost have to pity Hillary Clinton. She has seen this movie, and now she has to sit through it again. The players are different, but it's the same old plot: The lady arrives to cheers and high spirits, and eventually the lady vanishes.

Illustration on the root cause of our dysfunctional government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The summer of our discontent

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders represent two sides of the same coin. Both men have tapped into a deep anger -- a discontent -- in the public mood. Little seems to be going right.

Illustration on threats to Internet freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ensuring a free and open Internet

There aren't many things we can take for granted these days, but some things really feel as though they should be a given. A free and open Internet, for example.

Illustration recommending alternatives to changing Social Security by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chris Christie's backward remedy for Social Security

At the recent Republican debate, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie won his war of words with Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky over government surveillance. But the combative presidential hopeful fell off his high horse by aligning with the Wall Street-Washington axis seeking to convert Social Security into a glorified means-tested welfare program.

Illustration on U.S. oil exports by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An antiquated oil export ban

As part of the new nuclear agreement, the Iranian energy industry will be allowed to export its oil.

The Animas River flows with toxic waste from the Gold King Mine on Aug. 8, 2015, as seen from the 32nd Street Bridge in Durango, Colo., as the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad train goes by. (Associated Press) **FILE**

EPA's toxic adventure

Imagine an agency charged with protecting the environment, aptly named the Environmental Protection Agency. Because, you see, we need to protect the environment, and we need a government cudgel with which to do it.

Christians must vote

It has been estimated that less than 20 percent of self-identifying Christians vote. I believe this is the reason self-serving politicians govern our country.

Japan had further plans for U.S.

As World War II began, the United States knew Japanese intellectuals included accomplished physicists such as Yoshio Nishina. They knew he was a staunch Imperial nationalist and capable leader; so capable two of his students later won Nobel prizes.